COVID-19 pandemic in New York (state)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

COVID-19 pandemic in New York (state)
New York National Guard (49677711431).jpg
A testing center in Staten Island
COVID-19 rolling 14day Prevalence in New York by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in New York by confirmed new infections per 100,000 people over 14 days; (click to see date updated)
  1,000+
  500–1,000
  200–500
  100–200
  50–100
  20–50
  10–20
  0–10
  No confirmed new cases or no/bad data
COVID-19 Prevalence in New York by county.svg
Map of the outbreak in New York by confirmed total infections per 100,000 people (click on map for date of update)
  10,000+
  3,000–10,000
  1,000–3,000
  300–1,000
  100–300
  30–100
  0–30
  No confirmed infected or no data
DiseaseCOVID-19
Virus strainSARS-CoV-2
LocationNew York state, U.S.
First outbreakWuhan, Hubei, China
Index caseManhattan, New York City
Arrival datemid-February 2020[1]
(1st positive March 1)[2]
Confirmed cases2,213,176[3]
Hospitalized cases100,000+ (total)[4]
9,000 (current)
Recovered1,000,000+[5]
Deaths
52,906 (NYSDOH)[3]
39,834 (JHU)[6]
Government website
coronavirus.health.ny.gov

The first case of COVID-19 in the U.S. state of New York during the pandemic was confirmed on March 1, 2020,[2] and the state quickly became an epicenter of the pandemic, with a record 12,274 new cases reported on April 4 and approximately 29,000 more deaths reported for the month of April than the same month in 2019.[7] By April 10, New York had more confirmed cases than any country outside the US.[8] As of August 18, 2021, the state has reported 63.2 million tests,[3] with 2,213,176 cumulative cases, and 54,136 deaths.[9]

New York had the highest number of confirmed cases of any state from the start of U.S. outbreak until July 22, when it was first surpassed by California and later by Florida, Texas,[10][11] and Illinois. Approximately half of the state's cases have been in New York City,[3] where nearly half the state's population lives.

Despite the high number of cases in March and April, by May 7, New York had reduced the rate of increase of new cases to less than 1 percent per day, and since June 6 to less than 0.25 percent per day. Unlike many other states, New York did not see a spike or "second wave" in the daily new case rate during the summer months.[12][13] On June 17, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that New York had the lowest infection rate in the United States.[14] In late September, New York began to see an uptick in cases, with over 1,000 new cases reported in a single day for the first time since early June on September 26.[15]

As of February 17, 2021, the state of New York has the fourth highest number of confirmed cases in the United States, and the 34th highest number of confirmed cases per capita. It has the second highest count of deaths related to the virus, and second-highest count per capita, behind New Jersey.[16][17][18] In February 2021, the New York COVID-19 nursing home scandal surfaced, which drew huge criticism on Governor Cuomo's decision on withholding nusing home deaths.[19]

Government response to the pandemic in New York began with a full lockdown from March 2020 to April 2020, followed by a four-phase reopening plan by region from April 2020 to July 2020. Additional modifications to the plan have been imposed since July as the state has learned more about the pandemic and due to political pressure. In October 2020, a micro-cluster strategy was announced which shuts down areas of the state to varying degrees by ZIP code when cases increase.

As of August 2, 2021, New York has administered 22,997,841 COVID-19 vaccine doses, and has fully vaccinated 11,129,951 people, equivalent to 56.87 percent of the population.[20]

Origins

Genetic analysis confirmed that most cases of the virus had mutations indicating a European origin, meaning travelers flying to New York City from Europe brought the virus.[1] Americans visiting Italy in late February and returning to New York on March 1 were not asked by customs if they had spent time in Italy, even though the State Department had urged Americans not to travel to Italy on February 29 (the same day Italy reported 1,100 COVID cases).[21] According to statistical models, New York City already had 600 COVID-19 cases in mid-February, and as many as 10,000 cases by March 1.[22]

Timeline

COVID-19 cases in New York State, United States  ()
     Deaths        Discharges        Cases
2020202020212021
MarMarAprAprMayMayJunJunJulJulAugAugSepSepOctOctNovNovDecDec
JanJanFebFebMarMarAprAprMayMayJunJunJulJulAugAugSepSepOctOct
Last 15 daysLast 15 days
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-03-01 1 0
2020-03-02 2(+100.0%) 0
2020-03-03 11(+450.0%) 0
2020-03-04 22(+100.0%) 0
2020-03-05 44(+100.0%) 0
2020-03-06
76(+72.7%) 0
2020-03-07
105(+38.2%) 0
2020-03-08
142(+35.2%) 0
2020-03-09
173(+21.8%) 0
2020-03-10
216(+24.9%) 0
2020-03-11
325(+50.5%) 0
2020-03-12
421(+29.5%) 0
2020-03-13
613(+45.6%) 2
2020-03-14
729(+18.9%) 3(+50.0%)
2020-03-15
950(+30.3%) 7(+133.3%)
2020-03-16
1,374(+44.6%) 12(+71.4%)
2020-03-17
2,383(+73.4%) 16(+33.3%)
2020-03-18
4,152(+74.3%) 38(+137.5%)
2020-03-19
7,102(+71.1%) 46(+21.1%)
2020-03-20
10,356(+45.8%) 58(+26.1%)
2020-03-21
15,168(+46.5%) 76(+31.0%)
2020-03-22
20,875(+37.6%) 157(+106.6%)
2020-03-23
25,665(+22.9%) 271(+72.6%)
2020-03-24
30,811(+20.1%) 285(+5.2%)
2020-03-25
37,258(+20.9%) 385(+35.1%)
2020-03-26
44,635(+19.8%) 519(+34.8%)
2020-03-27
52,318(+17.2%) 728(+40.3%)
2020-03-28
59,513(+13.8%) 965(+32.6%)
2020-03-29
66,497(+11.7%) 1,218(+26.2%)
2020-03-30
75,795(+14.0%) 1,550(+27.3%)
2020-03-31
83,712(+10.4%) 1,941(+25.2%)
2020-04-01
92,381(+10.4%) 2,373(+22.3%)
2020-04-02
102,863(+11.3%) 2,935(+23.7%)
2020-04-03
113,704(+10.5%) 3,565(+21.5%)
2020-04-04
122,031(+7.3%) 4,159(+16.7%)
2020-04-05
130,689(+7.1%) 4,758(+14.4%)
2020-04-06
138,836(+6.2%) 5,489(+15.4%)
2020-04-07
149,316(+7.5%) 6,268(+14.2%)
2020-04-08
159,937(+7.1%) 7,067(+12.7%)
2020-04-09
170,512(+6.6%) 7,844(+11.0%)
2020-04-10
180,458(+5.8%) 8,627(+10.0%)
2020-04-11
188,694(+4.6%) 9,385(+8.8%)
2020-04-12
195,031(+3.4%) 10,056(+7.1%)
2020-04-13
202,208(+3.7%) 10,834(+7.7%)
2020-04-14
213,779(+5.7%) 11,586(+6.9%)
2020-04-15
222,284(+4.0%) 12,192(+5.2%)
2020-04-16
229,642(+3.3%) 12,822(+5.2%)
2020-04-17
236,732(+3.1%) 13,362(+4.2%)
2020-04-18
242,786(+2.6%) 13,869(+3.8%)
2020-04-19
247,512(+1.9%) 14,357(+3.5%)
2020-04-20
251,690(+1.7%) 14,828(+3.3%)
2020-04-21
257,216(+2.2%) 15,302(+3.2%)
2020-04-22
263,460(+2.4%) 15,740(+2.9%)
2020-04-23
271,590(+3.1%) 16,162(+2.7%)
2020-04-24
282,143(+3.9%) 16,599(+2.7%)
2020-04-25
288,045(+2.1%) 16,966(+2.2%)
2020-04-26
291,996(+1.4%) 17,303(+2.0%)
2020-04-27
295,106(+1.1%) 17,638(+1.9%)
2020-04-28
299,691(+1.6%) 18,015(+2.1%)
2020-04-29
304,372(+1.6%) 18,321(+1.8%)
2020-04-30
308,314(+1.3%) 18,610(+1.6%)
2020-05-01
312,977(+1.5%) 18,909(+1.6%)
2020-05-02
316,415(+1.1%) 19,189(+1.5%)
2020-05-03
318,953(+0.8%) 19,415(+1.2%)
2020-05-04
321,192(+0.7%) 19,645(+1.2%)
2020-05-05
323,978(+0.9%) 20,597(+4.8%)
2020-05-06
327,469(+1.1%) 20,828(+1.1%)
2020-05-07
330,407(+0.9%) 21,045(+1.0%)
2020-05-08
333,122(+0.8%) 21,271(+1.1%)
2020-05-09
335,395(+0.7%) 21,478(+1.0%)
2020-05-10
337,055(+0.5%) 21,640(+0.8%)
2020-05-11
338,485(+0.4%) 21,845(+0.9%)
2020-05-12
340,661(+0.6%) 22,013(+0.8%)
2020-05-13
343,051(+0.7%) 22,170(+0.7%)
2020-05-14
345,813(+0.8%) 22,304(+0.6%)
2020-05-15
348,232(+0.7%) 22,478(+0.8%)
2020-05-16
350,121(+0.5%) 22,619(+0.6%)
2020-05-17
351,371(+0.4%) 22,729(+0.5%)
2020-05-18
352,845(+0.4%) 22,843(+0.5%)
2020-05-19
354,370(+0.4%) 22,976(+0.6%)
2020-05-20
356,458(+0.6%) 23,083(+0.5%)
2020-05-21
358,154(+0.5%) 23,195(+0.5%)
2020-05-22
359,926(+0.5%) 23,282(+0.4%)
2020-05-23
361,515(+0.4%) 23,391(+0.5%)
2020-05-24
362,764(+0.3%) 23,488(+0.5%)
2020-05-25
363,836(+0.3%) 23,564(+0.3%)
2020-05-26
364,965(+0.3%) 23,643(+0.3%)
2020-05-27
366,733(+0.5%) 23,722(+0.3%)
2020-05-28
368,284(+0.4%) 23,780(+0.2%)
2020-05-29
369,660(+0.4%) 23,848(+0.3%)
2020-05-30
370,770(+0.3%) 23,905(+0.2%)
2020-05-31
371,711(+0.3%) 23,959(+0.2%)
2020-06-01
373,040(+0.4%) 24,023(+0.3%)
2020-06-02
374,085(+0.3%) 24,079(+0.2%)
2020-06-03
375,133(+0.3%) 24,133(+0.2%)
2020-06-04
376,208(+0.3%) 24,175(+0.2%)
2020-06-05
377,316(+0.3%) 24,212(+0.2%)
2020-06-06
378,097(+0.2%) 24,259(+0.2%)
2020-06-07
378,799(+0.2%) 24,299(+0.2%)
2020-06-08
379,482(+0.2%) 24,348(+0.2%)
2020-06-09
380,156(+0.2%) 24,404(+0.2%)
2020-06-10
380,892(+0.2%) 24,442(+0.2%)
2020-06-11
381,714(+0.2%) 24,495(+0.2%)
2020-06-12
382,630(+0.2%) 24,527(+0.1%)
2020-06-13
383,324(+0.2%) 24,551(+0.1%)
2020-06-14
383,944(+0.2%) 24,579(+0.1%)
2020-06-15
384,575(+0.2%) 24,608(+0.1%)
2020-06-16
385,142(+0.1%) 24,629(+0.1%)
2020-06-17
385,760(+0.2%) 24,661(+0.1%)
2020-06-18
386,556(+0.2%) 24,686(+0.1%)
2020-06-19
387,272(+0.2%) 24,710(+0.1%)
2020-06-20
387,936(+0.2%) 24,725(+0.1%)
2020-06-21
388,488(+0.1%) 24,739(+0.1%)
2020-06-22
389,085(+0.2%) 24,755(+0.1%)
2020-06-23
389,666(+0.1%) 24,782(+0.1%)
2020-06-24
390,415(+0.2%) 24,800(+0.1%)
2020-06-25
391,220(+0.2%) 24,814(+0.1%)
2020-06-26
391,923(+0.2%) 24,830(+0.1%)
2020-06-27
392,539(+0.2%) 24,835(+0.02%)
2020-06-28
392,930(+0.1%) 24,842(+0.03%)
2020-06-29
393,454(+0.1%) 24,855(+0.05%)
2020-06-30
394,079(+0.2%) 24,866(+0.04%)
2020-07-01
394,954(+0.2%) 24,877(+0.04%)
2020-07-02
395,872(+0.2%) 24,885(+0.03%)
2020-07-03
396,598(+0.2%) 24,896(+0.04%)
2020-07-04
397,131(+0.1%) 24,904(+0.03%)
2020-07-05
397,649(+0.1%) 24,913(+0.04%)
2020-07-06
398,237(+0.1%) 24,924(+0.04%)
2020-07-07
398,929(+0.2%) 24,944(+0.08%)
2020-07-08
399,513(+0.1%) 24,959(+0.06%)
2020-07-09
400,299(+0.2%) 24,967(+0.03%)
2020-07-10
401,029(+0.2%) 24,974(+0.03%)
2020-07-11
401,706(+0.2%) 24,979(+0.02%)
2020-07-12
402,263(+0.1%) 24,989(+0.04%)
2020-07-13
403,175(+0.2%) 24,994(+0.02%)
2020-07-14
404,006(+0.2%) 25,003(+0.04%)
2020-07-15
404,775(+0.2%) 25,013(+0.04%)
2020-07-16
405,551(+0.2%) 25,024(+0.04%)
2020-07-17
406,305(+0.2%) 25,036(+0.05%)
2020-07-18
406,807(+0.1%) 25,048(+0.05%)
2020-07-19
407,326(+0.1%) 25,056(+0.03%)
2020-07-20
408,181(+0.2%) 25,058(+0.01%)
2020-07-21
408,886(+0.2%) 25,068(+0.04%)
2020-07-22
409,697(+0.2%) 25,081(+0.04%)
2020-07-23
410,450(+0.2%) 25,093(+0.05%)
2020-07-24
411,200(+0.2%) 25,103(+0.04%)
2020-07-25
411,736(+0.1%) 25,106(+0.01%)
2020-07-26
412,344(+0.1%) 25,117(+0.04%)
2020-07-27
412,878(+0.1%) 25,126(+0.04%)
2020-07-28
413,593(+0.2%) 25,132(+0.02%)
2020-07-29
414,370(+0.2%) 25,145(+0.05%)
2020-07-30
415,014(+0.2%) 25,150(+0.02%)
2020-07-31
415,767(+0.2%) 25,164(+0.06%)
2020-08-01
416,298(+0.1%) 25,170(+0.02%)
2020-08-02
416,843(+0.1%) 25,172(+0.01%)
2020-08-03
417,589(+0.2%) 25,175(+0.01%)
2020-08-04
418,225(+0.2%) 25,179(+0.02%)
2020-08-05
418,928(+0.2%) 25,185(+0.02%)
2020-08-06
419,642(+0.2%) 25,190(+0.02%)
2020-08-07
420,345(+0.2%) 25,196(+0.02%)
2020-08-08
420,860(+0.1%) 25,202(+0.02%)
2020-08-09
421,336(+0.1%) 25,204(+0.01%)
2020-08-10
422,003(+0.2%) 25,211(+0.03%)
2020-08-11
422,703(+0.2%) 25,218(+0.03%)
2020-08-12
423,440(+0.2%) 25,228(+0.04%)
2020-08-13
424,167(+0.2%) 25,239(+0.04%)
2020-08-14
424,901(+0.2%) 25,244(+0.02%)
2020-08-15
425,508(+0.1%) 25,250(+0.02%)
2020-08-16
425,916(+0.1%) 25,256(+0.02%)
2020-08-17
426,571(+0.2%) 25,264(+0.03%)
2020-08-18
427,202(+0.1%) 25,270(+0.02%)
2020-08-19
427,803(+0.1%) 25,275(+0.02%)
2020-08-20
428,512(+0.2%) 25,278(+0.01%)
2020-08-21
429,165(+0.2%) 25,283(+0.01%)
2020-08-22
429,737(+0.1%) 25,288(+0.02%)
2020-08-23
430,145(+0.1%) 25,293(+0.02%)
2020-08-24
430,774(+0.1%) 25,297(+0.02%)
2020-08-25
431,340(+0.1%) 25,305(+0.03%)
2020-08-26
432,131(+0.2%) 25,309(+0.02%)
2020-08-27
432,767(+0.1%) 25,312(+0.01%)
2020-08-28
433,402(+0.1%) 25,319(+0.03%)
2020-08-29
434,100(+0.2%) 25,327(+0.03%)
2020-08-30
434,756(+0.1%) 25,328
2020-08-31
435,510(+0.2%) 25,331(+0.01%)
2020-09-01
436,218(+0.1%) 25,336(+0.02%)
2020-09-02
437,107(+0.2%) 25,343(+0.03%)
2020-09-03
437,971(+0.2%) 25,348(+0.02%)
2020-09-04
438,772(+0.2%) 25,350(+0.01%)
2020-09-05
439,501(+0.2%) 25,359(+0.04%)
2020-09-06
440,021(+0.1%) 25,361(+0.01%)
2020-09-07
440,578(+0.1%) 25,367(+0.02%)
2020-09-08
441,154(+0.1%) 25,370(+0.01%)
2020-09-09
441,911(+0.2%) 25,377(+0.03%)
2020-09-10
442,791(+0.2%) 25,382(+0.02%)
2020-09-11
443,640(+0.2%) 25,384(+0.01%)
2020-09-12
444,365(+0.2%) 25,390(+0.02%)
2020-09-13
444,948(+0.1%) 25,394(+0.02%)
2020-09-14
445,714(+0.2%) 25,402(+0.03%)
2020-09-15
446,366(+0.2%) 25,410(+0.03%)
2020-09-16
447,262(+0.1%) 25,413(+0.03%)
2020-09-17
448,052(+0.2%) 25,423(+0.05%)
2020-09-18
449,038(+0.2%) 25,425(+0.01%)
2020-09-19
449,900(+0.2%) 25,427(+0.01%)
2020-09-20
450,473(+0.1%) 25,428
2020-09-21
451,227(+0.2%) 25,432(+0.02%)
2020-09-22
451,892(+0.1%) 25,438(+0.02%)
2020-09-23
452,847(+0.2%) 25,442(+0.02%)
2020-09-24
453,755(+0.2%) 25,446(+0.01%)
2020-09-25
454,760(+0.2%) 25,451(+0.02%)
2020-09-26
455,620(+0.2%) 25,456(+0.02%)
2020-09-27
456,460(+0.2%) 25,468(+0.05%)
2020-09-28
457,649(+0.3%) 25,470(+0.01%)
2020-09-29
458,649(+0.2%) 25,479(+0.03%)
2020-09-30
460,031(+0.3%) 25,490(+0.04%)
2020-10-01
461,629(+0.3%) 25,497(+0.03%)
2020-10-02
463,360(+0.4%) 25,505(+0.03%)
2020-10-03
464,582(+0.3%) 25,519(+0.05%)
2020-10-04
465,515(+0.2%) 25,527(+0.05%)
2020-10-05
466,908(+0.3%) 25,536(+0.03%)
2020-10-06
468,268(+0.3%) 25,545(+0.03%)
2020-10-07
470,104(+0.4%) 25,555(+0.04%)
2020-10-08
471,696(+0.3%) 25,561(+0.02%)
2020-10-09
473,143(+0.3%) 25,569(+0.03%)
2020-10-10
474,268(+0.2%) 25,574(+0.02%)
2020-10-11
475,315(+0.2%) 25,587(+0.05%)
2020-10-12
476,708(+0.3%) 25,598(+0.04%)
2020-10-13
477,904(+0.3%) 25,605(+0.03%)
2020-10-14
479,400(+0.3%) 25,618(+0.05%)
2020-10-15
481,107(+0.3%) 25,628(+0.04%)
2020-10-16
482,891(+0.4%) 25,637(+0.03%)
2020-10-17
484,281(+0.3%) 25,644(+0.03%)
2020-10-18
485,279(+0.2%) 25,659(+0.06%)
2020-10-19
486,480(+0.2%) 25,672(+0.05%)
2020-10-20
488,506(+0.4%) 25,679(+0.03%)
2020-10-21
490,134(+0.3%) 25,694(+0.06%)
2020-10-22
491,771(+0.3%) 25,705(+0.04%)
2020-10-23
493,832(+0.4%) 25,718(+0.05%)
2020-10-24
495,464(+0.4%) 25,730(+0.05%)
2020-10-25
496,655(+0.2%) 25,742(+0.05%)
2020-10-26
498,646(+0.4%) 25,758(+0.06%)
2020-10-27
500,677(+0.4%) 25,773(+0.06%)
2020-10-28
503,176(+0.5%) 25,792(+0.07%)
2020-10-29
505,431(+0.4%) 25,804(+0.05%)
2020-10-30
507,480(+0.4%) 25,807(+0.01%)
2020-10-31
509,735(+0.4%) 25,824(+0.07%)
2020-11-01
511,368(+0.3%) 25,838(+0.05%)
2020-11-02
513,689(+0.4%) 25,853(+0.06%)
2020-11-03
515,815(+0.4%) 25,868(+0.06%)
2020-11-04
518,812(+0.6%) 25,892(+0.09%)
2020-11-05
522,021(+0.6%) 25,910(+0.07%)
2020-11-06
525,608(+0.7%) 25,928(+0.07%)
2020-11-07
529,036(+0.6%) 25,947(+0.07%)
2020-11-08
532,180(+0.6%) 25,973(+0.1%)
2020-11-09
536,145(+0.7%) 26,005(+0.1%)
2020-11-10
540,965(+0.9%) 26,026(+0.1%)
2020-11-11
545,762(+0.9%) 26,055(+0.1%)
2020-11-12
551,163(+1.0%) 26,079(+0.1%)
2020-11-13
556,551(+1.0%) 26,103(+0.1%)
2020-11-14
560,200(+0.7%) 26,133(+0.1%)
2020-11-15
563,690(+0.6%) 26,159(+0.1%)
2020-11-16
568,778(+0.9%) 26,189(+0.1%)
2020-11-17
574,072(+0.9%) 26,225(+0.1%)
2020-11-18
579,382(+0.9%) 26,257(+0.1%)
2020-11-19
584,850(+0.9%) 26,292(+0.1%)
2020-11-20
590,822(+1.0%) 26,326(+0.1%)
2020-11-21
596,214(+0.9%) 26,357(+0.1%)
2020-11-22
602,120(+1.0%) 26,390(+0.1%)
2020-11-23
607,001(+0.8%) 26,441(+0.2%)
2020-11-24
613,266(+1.0%) 26,482(+0.15%)
2020-11-25
620,199(+1.1%) 26,549(+0.25%)
2020-11-26
628,375(+1.3%) 26,588(+0.1%)
2020-11-27
634,438(+1.0%) 26,632(+0.2%)
2020-11-28
641,161(+1.1%) 26,690(+0.2%)
2020-11-29
647,980(+1.0%) 26,747(+0.2%)
2020-11-30
655,265(+1.1%) 26,816(+0.25%)
2020-12-01
664,238(+1.4%) 26,889(+0.25%)
2020-12-02
674,093(+1.5%) 26,955(+0.25%)
2020-12-03
685,364(+1.7%) 27,017(+0.25%)
2020-12-04
696,125(+1.6%) 27,089(+0.25%)
2020-12-05
705,827(+1.4%) 27,149(+0.2%)
2020-12-06
713,129(+1%) 27,232(+0.31%)
2020-12-07
722,464(+1.3%) 27,307(+0.28%)
2020-12-08
733,064(+1.5%) 27,404(+0.36%)
2020-12-09
743,242(+1.4%) 27,498(+0.34%)
2020-12-10
753,837(+1.4%) 27,587(+0.32%)
2020-12-11
764,966(+1.5%) 27,675(+0.32%)
2020-12-12
775,160(+1.3%) 27,785(+0.4%)
2020-12-13
784,204(+1.2%) 27,870(+0.31%)
2020-12-14
794,557(+1.3%) 28,002(+0.47%)
2020-12-15
804,555(+1.3%) 28,100(+0.35%)
2020-12-16
815,469(+1.4%) 28,222(+0.43%)
2020-12-17
828,166(+1.6%) 28,344(+0.43%)
2020-12-18
838,085(+1.2%) 28,474(+0.46%)
2020-12-19
848,042(+1.2%) 28,598(+0.44%)
2020-12-20
857,049(+1.1%) 28,709(+0.39%)
2020-12-21
866,765(+1.1%) 28,850(+0.49%)
2020-12-22
878,702(+1.4%) 29,016(+0.58%)
2020-12-23
891,270(+1.4%) 29,149(+0.46%)
2020-12-24
903,716(+1.4%) 29,270(+0.42%)
2020-12-25
914,522(+1.2%) 29,396(+0.43%)
2020-12-26
922,145(+0.83%) 29,511(+0.39%)
2020-12-27
932,552(+1.1%) 29,629(+0.4%)
2020-12-28
943,990(+1.2%) 29,756(+0.43%)
2020-12-29
957,412(+1.4%) 29,905(+0.5%)
2020-12-30
974,214(+1.8%) 30,040(+0.45%)
2020-12-31
990,711(+1.7%) 30,208(+0.56%)
2021-01-01
1,005,785(+1.5%) 30,337(+0.43%)
2021-01-02
1,017,153(+1.1%) 30,476(+0.46%)
2021-01-03
1,028,362(+1.1%) 30,648(+0.56%)
2021-01-04
1,041,028(+1.2%) 30,802(+0.5%)
2021-01-05
1,057,676(+1.6%) 30,965(+0.53%)
2021-01-06
1,075,312(+1.7%) 31,164(+0.64%)
2021-01-07
1,094,144(+1.8%) 31,329(+0.53%)
2021-01-08
1,111,087(+1.5%) 31,519(+0.61%)
2021-01-09
1,126,442(+1.4%) 31,672(+0.49%)
2021-01-10
1,140,156(+1.2%) 31,841(+0.53%)
2021-01-11
1,155,370(+1.3%) 32,007(+0.52%)
2021-01-12
1,169,947(+1.3%) 32,175(+0.52%)
2021-01-13
1,183,608(+1.2%) 32,379(+0.63%)
2021-01-14
1,203,550(+1.7%) 32,566(+0.58%)
2021-01-15
1,219,548(+1.3%) 32,725(+0.49%)
2021-01-16
1,233,390(+1.1%) 32,897(+0.53%)
2021-01-17
1,245,575(+0.99%) 33,052(+0.47%)
2021-01-18
1,258,087(+1%) 33,224(+0.52%)
2021-01-19
1,271,451(+1.1%) 33,415(+0.57%)
2021-01-20
1,285,337(+1.1%) 33,594(+0.54%)
2021-01-21
1,300,481(+1.2%) 33,763(+0.5%)
2021-01-22
1,314,267(+1.1%) 33,907(+0.43%)
2021-01-23
1,326,987(+0.97%) 34,069(+0.48%)
2021-01-24
1,338,990(+0.9%) 34,242(+0.51%)
2021-01-25
1,350,054(+0.83%) 34,407(+0.48%)
2021-01-26
1,361,082(+0.82%) 34,579(+0.5%)
2021-01-27
1,374,480(+0.98%) 34,742(+0.47%)
2021-01-28
1,387,059(+0.92%) 34,893(+0.43%)
2021-01-29
1,399,863(+0.92%) 35,036(+0.41%)
2021-01-30
1,410,656(+0.77%) 35,178(+0.41%)
2021-01-31
1,419,164(+0.6%) 35,319(+0.4%)
2021-02-01
1,427,379(+0.58%) 35,466(+0.42%)
2021-02-02
1,433,304(+0.42%) 35,631(+0.47%)
2021-02-03
1,440,718(+0.52%) 35,767(+0.38%)
2021-02-04
1,449,495(+0.61%) 35,920(+0.43%)
2021-02-05
1,460,747(+0.78%) 36,079(+0.44%)
2021-02-06
1,470,772(+0.69%) 36,224(+0.4%)
2021-02-07
1,479,220(+0.57%) 36,339(+0.32%)
2021-02-08
1,487,086(+0.53%) 36,481(+0.39%)
2021-02-09
1,494,187(+0.48%) 36,619(+0.38%)
2021-02-10
1,504,286(+0.68%) 36,743(+0.34%)
2021-02-11
1,512,690(+0.56%) 36,882(+0.38%)
2021-02-12
1,521,453(+0.58%) 37,009(+0.34%)
2021-02-13
1,529,769(+0.55%) 37,118(+0.29%)
2021-02-14
1,536,134(+0.42%) 37,221(+0.28%)
2021-02-15
1,542,887(+0.44%) 37,328(+0.29%)
2021-02-16
1,548,979(+0.39%) 37,440(+0.3%)
2021-02-17
1,555,773(+0.44%) 37,556(+0.31%)
2021-02-18
1,564,483(+0.56%) 37,675(+0.32%)
2021-02-19
1,572,175(+0.49%) 37,776(+0.27%)
2021-02-20
1,578,785(+0.42%) 37,851(+0.2%)
2021-02-21
1,584,931(+0.39%) 37,941(+0.24%)
2021-02-22
1,591,585(+0.42%) 38,031(+0.24%)
2021-02-23
1,597,774(+0.39%) 38,135(+0.27%)
2021-02-24
1,606,520(+0.55%) 38,227(+0.24%)
2021-02-25
1,614,724(+0.51%) 38,321(+0.25%)
2021-02-26
1,622,865(+0.5%) 38,407(+0.22%)
2021-02-27
1,630,445(+0.47%) 38,497(+0.23%)
2021-02-28
1,636,680(+0.38%) 38,577(+0.21%)
2021-03-01
1,642,480(+0.35%) 38,660(+0.22%)
2021-03-02
1,650,184(+0.47%) 38,735(+0.19%)
2021-03-03
1,657,777(+0.46%) 38,796(+0.16%)
2021-03-04
1,666,733(+0.54%) 38,891(+0.24%)
2021-03-05
1,674,380(+0.46%) 38,970(+0.2%)
2021-03-06
1,681,169(+0.41%) 39,029(+0.15%)
2021-03-07
1,686,478(+0.32%) 39,093(+0.16%)
2021-03-08
1,693,328(+0.41%) 39,169(+0.19%)
2021-03-09
1,699,817(+0.38%) 39,230(+0.16%)
2021-03-10
1,706,564(+0.4%) 39,311(+0.21%)
2021-03-11
1,715,863(+0.54%) 39,385(+0.19%)
2021-03-12
1,722,463(+0.38%) 39,464(+0.2%)
2021-03-13
1,728,406(+0.35%) 39,527(+0.16%)
2021-03-14
1,734,213(+0.34%) 39,585(+0.15%)
2021-03-15
1,740,721(+0.38%) 39,636(+0.13%)
2021-03-16
1,749,697(+0.52%) 39,690(+0.14%)
2021-03-17
1,757,493(+0.45%) 39,748(+0.15%)
2021-03-18
1,765,755(+0.47%) 39,808(+0.15%)
2021-03-19
1,773,378(+0.43%) 39,870(+0.16%)
2021-03-20
1,781,316(+0.45%) 39,924(+0.14%)
2021-03-21
1,787,677(+0.36%) 39,970(+0.12%)
2021-03-22
1,794,478(+0.38%) 40,023(+0.13%)
2021-03-23
1,801,756(+0.41%) 40,096(+0.18%)
2021-03-24
1,809,837(+0.45%) 40,141(+0.11%)
2021-03-25
1,818,344(+0.47%) 40,190(+0.12%)
2021-03-26
1,826,545(+0.45%) 40,266(+0.19%)
2021-03-27
1,835,940(+0.51%) 40,330(+0.16%)
2021-03-28
1,843,562(+0.42%) 40,390(+0.15%)
2021-03-29
1,850,050(+0.35%) 40,451(+0.15%)
2021-03-30
1,858,432(+0.45%) 40,513(+0.15%)
2021-03-31
1,867,320(+0.48%) 40,570(+0.14%)
2021-04-01
1,875,107(+0.42%) 40,635(+0.16%)
2021-04-02
1,882,953(+0.42%) 40,695(+0.15%)
2021-04-03
1,890,420(+0.4%) 40,756(+0.15%)
2021-04-04
1,897,003(+0.35%) 40,813(+0.14%)
2021-04-05
1,902,751(+0.3%) 40,861(+0.12%)
2021-04-06
1,909,964(+0.38%) 40,922(+0.15%)
2021-04-07
1,918,343(+0.44%) 40,970(+0.12%)
2021-04-08
1,927,357(+0.47%) 41,028(+0.14%)
2021-04-09
1,934,640(+0.38%) 41,086(+0.14%)
2021-04-10
1,941,404(+0.35%) 41,139(+0.13%)
2021-04-11
1,946,330(+0.25%) 41,198(+0.14%)
2021-04-12
1,951,359(+0.26%) 41,257(+0.14%)
2021-04-13
1,957,551(+0.32%) 41,301(+0.11%)
2021-04-14
1,964,435(+0.35%) 41,347(+0.11%)
2021-04-15
1,970,990(+0.33%) 41,391(+0.11%)
2021-04-16
1,979,225(+0.42%) 41,450(+0.14%)
2021-04-17
1,984,929(+0.29%) 41,485(+0.08%)
2021-04-18
1,989,268(+0.22%) 41,530(+0.11%)
2021-04-19
1,993,190(+0.2%) 41,575(+0.11%)
2021-04-20
1,997,516(+0.22%) 41,629(+0.13%)
2021-04-21
2,002,512(+0.25%) 41,678(+0.12%)
2021-04-22
2,007,413(+0.24%) 41,723(+0.11%)
2021-04-23
2,011,577(+0.21%) 41,757(+0.08%)
2021-04-24
2,015,664(+0.2%) 41,808(+0.12%)
2021-04-25
2,018,703(+0.15%) 41,849(+0.1%)
2021-04-26
2,021,407(+0.13%) 41,875(+0.06%)
2021-04-27
2,024,553(+0.16%) 41,910(+0.08%)
2021-04-28
2,028,626(+0.2%) 41,948(+0.09%)
2021-04-29
2,032,494(+0.19%) 41,992(+0.1%)
2021-04-30
2,036,219(+0.18%) 42,018(+0.06%)
2021-05-01
2,039,068(+0.14%) 42,051(+0.08%)
2021-05-02
2,041,268(+0.11%) 42,088(+0.09%)
2021-05-03
2,043,441(+0.11%) 42,129(+0.1%)
2021-05-04
2,045,904(+0.12%) 42,161(+0.08%)
2021-05-05
2,048,489(+0.13%) 42,185(+0.06%)
2021-05-06
2,050,859(+0.12%) 42,211(+0.06%)
2021-05-07
2,054,054(+0.16%) 42,244(+0.08%)
2021-05-08
2,056,323(+0.11%) 42,279(+0.08%)
2021-05-09
2,057,903(+0.08%) 42,307(+0.07%)
2021-05-10
2,059,419(+0.07%) 42,341(+0.08%)
2021-05-11
2,061,249(+0.09%) 42,367(+0.06%)
2021-05-12
2,063,465(+0.11%) 42,389(+0.05%)
2021-05-13
2,065,533(+0.1%) 42,417(+0.07%)
2021-05-14
2,067,574(+0.1%) 42,440(+0.05%)
2021-05-15
2,069,135(+0.08%) 42,473(+0.08%)
2021-05-16
2,070,413(+0.06%) 42,486(+0.03%)
2021-05-17
2,071,443(+0.05%) 42,503(+0.04%)
2021-05-18
2,072,874(+0.07%) 42,524(+0.05%)
2021-05-19
2,074,457(+0.08%) 42,542(+0.04%)
2021-05-20
2,075,997(+0.07%) 42,558(+0.04%)
2021-05-21
2,077,344(+0.06%) 42,582(+0.06%)
2021-05-22
2,078,417(+0.05%) 42,594(+0.03%)
2021-05-23
2,079,346(+0.04%) 42,608(+0.03%)
2021-05-24
2,080,113(+0.04%) 42,624(+0.04%)
2021-05-25
2,081,049(+0.04%) 42,642(+0.04%)
2021-05-26
2,082,104(+0.05%) 42,653(+0.03%)
2021-05-27
2,083,041(+0.05%) 42,665(+0.03%)
2021-05-28
2,083,911(+0.04%) 42,677(+0.03%)
2021-05-29
2,084,696(+0.04%) 42,696(+0.04%)
2021-05-30
2,085,190(+0.02%) 42,715(+0.04%)
2021-05-31
2,085,581(+0.02%) 42,723(+0.02%)
2021-06-01
2,086,012(+0.02%) 42,734(+0.03%)
2021-06-02
2,086,577(+0.03%) 42,745(+0.03%)
2021-06-03
2,087,356(+0.04%) 42,760(+0.04%)
2021-06-04
2,088,117(+0.04%) 42,776(+0.04%)
2021-06-05
2,088,666(+0.03%) 42,789(+0.03%)
2021-06-06
2,089,129(+0.02%) 42,799(+0.02%)
2021-06-07
2,089,571(+0.02%) 42,813(+0.03%)
2021-06-08
2,089,997(+0.02%) 42,824(+0.03%)
2021-06-09
2,090,563(+0.03%) 42,833(+0.02%)
2021-06-10
2,091,043(+0.02%) 42,844(+0.03%)
2021-06-11
2,091,576(+0.03%) 42,856(+0.03%)
2021-06-12
2,091,959(+0.02%) 42,864(+0.02%)
2021-06-13
2,092,279(+0.02%) 42,872(+0.02%)
2021-06-14
2,092,599(+0.02%) 42,882(+0.02%)
2021-06-15
2,092,948(+0.02%) 42,891(+0.02%)
2021-06-16
2,093,366(+0.02%) 42,896(+0.01%)
2021-06-17
2,093,736(+0.02%) 42,905(+0.02%)
2021-06-18
2,094,154(+0.02%) 42,914(+0.02%)
2021-06-19
2,094,412(+0.01%) 42,918(+0.01%)
2021-06-20
2,094,663(+0.01%) 42,928(+0.02%)
2021-06-21
2,094,923(+0.01%) 42,936(+0.02%)
2021-06-22
2,095,233(+0.01%) 42,942(+0.01%)
2021-06-23
2,095,576(+0.02%) 42,947(+0.01%)
2021-06-24
2,095,919(+0.02%) 42,952(+0.01%)
2021-06-25
2,096,304(+0.02%) 42,957(+0.01%)
2021-06-26
2,096,650(+0.02%) 42,961(+0.01%)
2021-06-27
2,096,940(+0.01%) 42,964(+0.01%)
2021-06-28
2,097,215(+0.01%) 42,967(+0.01%)
2021-06-29
2,097,560(+0.02%) 42,972(+0.01%)
2021-06-30
2,097,971(+0.02%) 42,974(=)
2021-07-01
2,098,477(+0.02%) 42,978(+0.01%)
2021-07-02
2,098,887(+0.02%) 42,980(=)
2021-07-03
2,099,308(+0.02%) 42,984(+0.01%)
2021-07-04
2,099,676(+0.02%) 42,986(=)
2021-07-05
2,099,931(+0.01%) 42,993(+0.02%)
2021-07-06
2,100,417(+0.02%) 42,998(+0.01%)
2021-07-07
2,101,087(+0.03%) 43,001(+0.01%)
2021-07-08
2,101,904(+0.04%) 43,006(+0.01%)
2021-07-09
2,102,565(+0.03%) 43,009(+0.01%)
2021-07-10
2,103,231(+0.03%) 43,010(=)
2021-07-11
2,103,804(+0.03%) 43,011(=)
2021-07-12
2,104,447(+0.03%) 43,018(+0.02%)
2021-07-13
2,105,259(+0.04%) 43,020(=)
2021-07-14
2,106,215(+0.05%) 43,023(+0.01%)
2021-07-15
2,107,196(+0.05%) 43,025(=)
2021-07-16
2,108,352(+0.05%) 43,029(+0.01%)
2021-07-17
2,109,494(+0.05%) 43,031(=)
2021-07-18
2,110,317(+0.04%) 43,034(+0.01%)
2021-07-19
2,111,461(+0.05%) 43,036(=)
2021-07-20
2,112,913(+0.07%) 43,041(+0.01%)
2021-07-21
2,114,497(+0.07%) 43,043(=)
2021-07-22
2,116,327(+0.09%) 43,045(=)
2021-07-23
2,118,173(+0.09%) 43,046(=)
2021-07-24
2,120,155(+0.09%) 43,055(+0.02%)
2021-07-25
2,121,451(+0.06%) 43,059(+0.01%)
2021-07-26
2,123,130(+0.08%) 43,061(=)
2021-07-27
2,125,333(+0.1%) 43,068(+0.02%)
2021-07-28
2,127,900(+0.12%) 43,070(=)
2021-07-29
2,130,577(+0.13%) 43,074(+0.01%)
2021-07-30
2,133,627(+0.14%) 43,079(+0.01%)
2021-07-31
2,136,143(+0.12%) 43,089(+0.02%)
2021-08-01
2,138,286(+0.1%) 43,093(+0.01%)
2021-08-02
2,141,218(+0.14%) 43,098(+0.01%)
2021-08-03
2,144,333(+0.15%) 43,105(+0.02%)
2021-08-04
2,147,977(+0.17%) 43,111(+0.01%)
2021-08-05
2,151,677(+0.17%) 43,116(+0.01%)
2021-08-06
2,156,062(+0.2%) 43,128(+0.03%)
2021-08-07
2,159,529(+0.16%) 43,139(+0.03%)
2021-08-08
2,163,144(+0.17%) 43,151(+0.03%)
2021-08-09
2,166,366(+0.15%) 43,168(+0.04%)
2021-08-10
2,170,516(+0.19%) 43,184(+0.04%)
2021-08-11
2,175,217(+0.22%) 43,202(+0.04%)
2021-08-12
2,179,808(+0.21%) 43,216(+0.03%)
2021-08-13
2,184,282(+0.21%) 43,229(+0.03%)
2021-08-14
2,188,761(+0.21%) 43,248(+0.04%)
2021-08-15
2,192,336(+0.16%) 43,259(+0.03%)
2021-08-16
2,195,903(+0.16%) 43,277(+0.04%)
2021-08-17
2,200,640(+0.22%) 43,299(+0.05%)
2021-08-18
2,205,778(+0.23%) 43,318(+0.04%)
2021-08-19
2,210,610(+0.22%) 43,335(+0.04%)
2021-08-20
2,215,600(+0.23%) 43,355(+0.05%)
2021-08-21
2,219,940(+0.2%) 43,376(+0.05%)
2021-08-22
2,223,756(+0.17%) 43,404(+0.06%)
2021-08-23
2,226,955(+0.14%) 55,395(+28%)
2021-08-24
2,231,227(+0.19%) 55,423(+0.05%)
2021-08-25
2,236,634(+0.24%) 55,440(+0.03%)
2021-08-26
2,242,982(+0.28%) 55,453(+0.02%)
2021-08-27
2,248,506(+0.25%) 55,453(=)
2021-08-28
2,252,752(+0.19%) 55,453(=)
2021-08-29
2,256,899(+0.18%) 55,533(+0.14%)
2021-08-30
2,260,688(+0.17%) 55,602(+0.12%)
2021-08-31
2,265,300(+0.2%) 55,621(+0.03%)
2021-09-01
2,270,243(+0.22%) 55,642(+0.04%)
2021-09-02
2,276,253(+0.26%) 55,654(+0.02%)
2021-09-03
2,281,283(+0.22%) 55,654(=)
2021-09-04
2,285,778(+0.2%) 55,654(=)
2021-09-05
2,289,438(+0.16%) 55,654(=)
2021-09-06
2,292,760(+0.15%) 55,768(+0.2%)
2021-09-07
2,296,611(+0.17%) 55,805(+0.07%)
2021-09-08
2,302,013(+0.24%) 55,878(+0.13%)
2021-09-09
2,308,164(+0.27%) 55,891(+0.02%)
2021-09-10
2,313,932(+0.25%) 55,891(=)
2021-09-11
2,319,379(+0.24%) 55,891(=)
2021-09-12
2,323,065(+0.16%) 56,029(+0.25%)
2021-09-13
2,327,163(+0.18%) 56,097(+0.12%)
2021-09-14
2,332,015(+0.21%) 56,139(+0.07%)
2021-09-15
2,338,744(+0.29%) 56,153(+0.02%)
2021-09-16
2,344,525(+0.25%) 56,184(+0.06%)
2021-09-17
2,349,893(+0.23%) 56,184(=)
2021-09-18
2,355,168(+0.22%) 56,184(=)
2021-09-19
2,358,600(+0.15%) 56,309(+0.22%)
2021-09-20
2,363,842(+0.22%) 56,309(=)
2021-09-21
2,368,515(+0.2%) 56,371(+0.11%)
2021-09-22
2,373,329(+0.2%) 56,434(+0.11%)
2021-09-23
2,379,399(+0.26%) 56,462(+0.05%)
2021-09-24
2,384,687(+0.22%) 56,462(=)
2021-09-25
2,389,001(+0.18%) 56,462(=)
2021-09-26
2,393,005(+0.17%) 56,611(+0.26%)
2021-09-27
2,397,119(+0.17%) 56,674(+0.11%)
2021-09-28
2,402,256(+0.21%) 56,682(+0.01%)
2021-09-29
2,407,000(+0.2%) 56,752(+0.12%)
2021-09-30
2,412,187(+0.22%) 56,758(+0.01%)
2021-10-01
2,416,888(+0.19%) 56,758(=)
2021-10-02
2,421,472(+0.19%) 56,758(=)
2021-10-03
2,424,368(+0.12%) 56,917(+0.28%)
2021-10-04
2,428,245(+0.16%) 56,978(+0.11%)
2021-10-05
2,433,917(+0.23%) 56,992(+0.02%)
2021-10-06
2,439,160(+0.22%) 57,031(+0.07%)
2021-10-07
2,444,814(+0.23%) 57,047(+0.03%)
2021-10-08
2,449,618(+0.2%) 57,047(=)
2021-10-09
2,452,403(+0.11%) 57,047(=)
2021-10-10
2,457,531(+0.21%) 57,047(=)
2021-10-11
2,460,907(+0.14%) 57,151(+0.18%)
2021-10-12
2,465,565(+0.19%) 57,279(+0.22%)
2021-10-13
2,469,966(+0.18%) 57,288(+0.02%)
2021-10-14
2,475,659(+0.23%) 57,288(=)
2021-10-15
2,480,907(+0.21%) 57,288(=)
Cases: The number of cases confirmed in New York State

Fatalities: On August 24th, Governor Hochul updated fatalities to include all deaths reported to the CDC. Previously, only healthcare facility fatalities were being reported through HERDS
Discharges: The number of surviving patients discharged (only NY uses this definition)
Sources: "Past Coronavirus Briefings". New York State Department of Health.;
"Johns Hopkins CSSE daily reports". GitHub. (for recoveries);
"Official news from the Office of the Governor". ny.gov. (for newest recovery count)

March 1, 2020, saw the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in New York State, a 39-year-old woman health care worker who lived in Manhattan,[2] who had returned from Iran on February 25 with no symptoms at the time. She went into home isolation with her husband.[23]

On March 3, a second case was confirmed, a lawyer in his 50s who lived in New Rochelle, Westchester County, immediately north of New York City, and worked in Midtown Manhattan at a law firm within One Grand Central Place.[24] He had traveled to Miami in February, but had not visited areas known to have widespread transmission of the coronavirus. Two of his four children had recently returned from Israel. After first feeling ill on February 22, he was admitted to a hospital in Westchester on February 27, diagnosed with pneumonia, and released from isolation after testing negative for the flu.[25][26] Instances of panic buying in New York were reported after his case was confirmed.[27]

On March 4, the number of cases in New York State increased to 11 as nine people linked to the lawyer tested positive, including his wife, a son, a daughter, a neighbor, and a friend and his family.[28]

On March 5, New York City mayor Bill de Blasio said that coronavirus fears should not keep New Yorkers off the subway, riding from Fulton Street to High Street in a public press attempt to demonstrate the subway's safety.[29]

On March 6, eleven new cases were reported, bringing the state caseload to 33.[30] All the new cases were tied to the first community transmission case, the lawyer.[31] At the end of the day, an additional 11 new cases were reported by the governor, bringing the total caseload to 44, with 8 of the new cases in Westchester County, and 3 in Nassau County on Long Island.[32] Also on March 6, an article appeared in the New York Post stating that while Mayor de Blasio assigned responsibility for the lack of N95 masks and other personal protective equipment to the federal government, the city never ordered the supplies until that date.[33]

On March 7, Governor Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency in New York after 89 cases had been confirmed in the state, 70 of them in Westchester County, 12 in New York City and 7 elsewhere.[34]

On March 8, the state reported 16 new confirmed cases and a total of 106 cases statewide.[35] New York City issued new commuter guidelines amid the current outbreak, asking sick individuals to stay off public transit, encouraging citizens to avoid densely packed buses, subways, or trains.[36]

Location of the New Rochelle Containment Area within Westchester County
National Guard personnel disinfect the dais of New Rochelle City Hall.

On March 9, Mayor de Blasio announced that there were 16 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in New York City.[37] On March 10, Governor Cuomo announced a containment zone in the city of New Rochelle from March 12 to 25.[38]

On March 11, Cuomo announced that the City University of New York and State University of New York schools would be closed for the following week, from March 12 to 19. These college systems would move most classes to an online-based system starting March 19, and continuing through the rest of the spring semester. Dormitories will remain open for students "who cannot return home for hardship reasons."[39] Also on March 11, a man in Monroe County tested positive, making it the first county in Western New York to have a COVID-19 case.[40] Officials said he flew into JFK from Italy, traveled on a Greyhound bus from Manhattan to Rochester, and arrived locally the morning of March 10. The bus continued on to Buffalo and Toronto.[41]

On March 12, the first two cases were confirmed in Albany County, leading Albany mayor Kathy Sheehan to suspend the annual St. Patrick's Day parade.[42] The same day, a staff member at Union College tested positive for coronavirus in Schenectady County, marking the county's first case.[43]

On March 13, Herkimer County saw its first confirmed case but declined to disclose the patient's location. The patient later was revealed to have been from the Mohawk/Ilion area, just south of Herkimer, the county seat.[44]

On March 14, the first two fatalities in the state occurred. An 82-year-old woman in Brooklyn with pre-existing emphysema died in the hospital.[45] A 65-year-old person with other significant health problems who had not previously been tested for COVID-19 died at their home in Suffern, Rockland County.[46] It was also announced that three people in Erie County tested positive for COVID-19.[47] Orange County, Dutchess County and Ulster County closed down all their schools.[48]

On March 15, the third fatality in the state was announced. A 79-year-old woman with underlying health issues died, who had been admitted to a New York City hospital.[49]

On March 16, Clinton County reported its first case, at CVPH Medical Center in Plattsburgh. No further information has been revealed about the patient.[50] Confirmed cases increased by 4,000 between March 22 and 23, which brought the total number of confirmed cases statewide to nearly 21,000.[51] 12,305 of these were in New York City.[52]

On March 24, Cuomo said, "The apex is higher than we thought and the apex is sooner than we thought." He warned there was not enough assistance from the federal government and that the state had 25,000 cases and at least 210 deaths.[53] 211 NYPD officers and civilian employees have tested positive for COVID-19. In total, 2,774 NYPD employees, 7.6 percent of the workforce, were sick.[54] There were approximately 4,000 positive cases in Westchester County by March 24,[55] and more than 15,000 confirmed cases by April 9.[56]

On March 26, 2020, Cuomo announced that the state would allow two patients to share one ventilator using a technique he called "splitting," where a second set of tubes would be added to the ventilator. COVID-19 patients need ventilators for between 11 and 21 days, while under normal circumstances patients usually only require them for three to four days. He also said the state was considering converting anesthesia machines to use as ventilators.[57] Between March 25 and March 26, there were 100 deaths statewide, with the number of hospitalized patients increasing by 40 percent in New York City.[58]

Researchers at Cornell University created an interactive map to visualize the spread of COVID-19 in New York State.[59]

On January 4, 2021, a confirmed case of a new, more contagious SARS-CoV-2 variant from the United Kingdom was reported in New York. The patient is a man in his sixties from Saratoga County in upstate New York, who had no travel history to the United Kingdom.[60] As of March 2, 2021, 286 sequences in the B.1.1.7 lineage have been detected in New York.[61]

On July 22, 2021, 31 out of 550 campers at sleep-away Camp Pontiac in upstate New York tested positive. All were under the age of 12, making them too young to receive a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States.[62]

Impact on health care

Shortage of protective gear and medical equipment

After trying to purchase 200,000 N95 masks on February 7, 2020, the Office of Emergency Management learned that vendors were out of stock. Emergency provisions of masks and hand sanitizers did not arrive until early March. One medical supply vendor with standing city contracts said that the initial requests for protective gear from the Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS) were bogged down by inefficient bureaucratic delays. One vendor said, "We'd send them a list of products we can deliver within 24, 48 hours," but on average it took 72 hours for the agency to place an order. He added "the city just moves so slow" when there was very high demand coming from hospitals and the private sector. According to the contractor, eight out of 10 supply orders could not be filled because DCAS did not pay on time, which a spokeswoman for New York City denied. The office of the comptroller approved 12 contracts with a total value of $150 million before the mayor's office took over the process on March 16. Mayor de Blasio said that the city might run out of supplies by April if the federal government did not send 3 million N95 masks, 50 million surgical masks, 15,000 ventilators, and 45 million surgical gowns, gloves, and face shields.[63]

One EMS worker expressed frustration at being asked to wear the less-effective surgical masks.[64] The police union filed a complaint on March 13 due to NYPD officers not being given masks and other protective gear. A spokeswoman called the Police Benevolent Association's complaint "empty rhetoric".[65]

New York gave a $69 million contract to a Silicon Valley engineer to provide 1,000 ventilators. The ventilators were never delivered. As of May 5, New York was seeking a refund. The engineer's name had been supplied by federal officials, and they had received it from volunteers in the office of Jared Kushner, senior advisor to President Trump. According to the New York Times, it appears the engineer had not been vetted by anyone.[66]

Paramedic shortages

On March 28, 2020, The New York Times reported that the city's 911 emergency response system was "overwhelmed" due to the large number of coronavirus patients needing transport to the hospital. Dispatchers received more than 7,000 calls on March 26, a record since the September 11 attacks. Emergency workers had to decide which cases to prioritize, and some patients were being left at home without medical care. In addition, paramedics lacked sufficient protective gear.[67]

Testing

The private corporations responsible for testing have a limited testing capacity. Eventually, their testing capacity will reach a bottleneck where it becomes increasingly difficult to conduct more tests per day. Backlogs for test results continue to increase in multiple states such as California, where it can take weeks to receive test results.[68]

The FDA has approved New York state to authorize the state's 28 public and private labs to begin manual, semi-automated and automated testing for novel coronavirus, or COVID-19. The approval allows the state to dramatically increase testing capacity to thousands of tests per day. The approval also extends to the Roche high-volume platform for testing. New York State's Wadsworth Lab has developed a new, less intrusive test for COVID-19. The new test is done through a saliva sample and a self-administered short nasal swab in the presence of a healthcare professional. Additionally, health care professionals can self-administer the test without another health care professional present.[69]

Government response

Timeline for State Government Response
Date Action Taken
March 7, 2020 State of emergency declared.
March 9, 2020 State began producing its own brand of hand sanitizer.
March 10, 2020 Governor Cuomo orders a coronavirus "containment zone" in New Rochelle, Westchester County, NY.[70]
March 12, 2020 All gatherings of less than 500 people ordered to cut capacity by 50%. All gatherings of more than 500 people ordered to cancel.
March 12, 2020 All SUNY campuses ordered to close within a week, and then shift to online for the remainder of the semester.
March 15, 2020 All New York City schools ordered to close until April 20.
March 16, 2020 Cuomo coordinates with his counterparts in New Jersey and Connecticut to formulate uniform policies for shutdowns.[71]
March 20, 2020 State-wide stay-at-home order declared. All non-essential businesses ordered to close. All non-essential gatherings canceled/postponed.[71]
March 25, 2020 Advisory issued ordering nursing homes to admit patients who test positive for the coronavirus and to not allow testing of prospective nursing home patients. This order was revoked on May 10.
March 27, 2020 All schools statewide ordered to remain closed until April 15.
March 28, 2020 All non-essential construction sites ordered to shut down.
April 6, 2020 Statewide stay-at-home order and school closures extended to April 29.
April 9, 2020 List of businesses deemed essential expanded.
April 15, 2020 All state residents ordered to wear face masks/coverings in public places where social distancing is not possible.
April 16, 2020 Statewide stay-at-home order and school closures extended to May 15.
May 1, 2020 All schools and universities ordered to remain closed for the remainder of the academic year.
May 7, 2020 Statewide four-phase reopening plan is first announced.
May 14, 2020 Statewide state of emergency extended to June 13.
May 15, 2020 Phase 1 of reopening allowed for counties that met qualifications. Five counties met qualifications and began reopening on this date.
May 15, 2020 Drive-in theaters, landscaping/gardening businesses allowed to reopen state-wide (regardless of Phase 1 qualifications).
May 23, 2020 Gatherings of up to ten people allowed as long as social distancing is practiced.
June 8, 2020 New York City meets conditions for Phase 1, allowing the reopening of construction, manufacturing, agriculture, forestry, fishing, and select retail businesses that can offer curbside pickup.
June 15, 2020 Four-phase reopening plan is modified to allow non-essential gatherings of 25 people upon entry of Phase 3, and 50 people upon entry of Phase 4.
June 22, 2020 New York City meets conditions for Phase 2, allowing the reopening of outdoor dining at restaurants, hair salons and barber shops, offices, real estate firms, in-store retail, vehicle sales, retail rental, repair services, cleaning services, and commercial building management businesses.
July 10, 2020 Malls allowed to open at 25% capacity for regions in Phase 4, with all patrons required to wear masks.
July 16, 2020 New restrictions on bars/restaurants only allowing alcohol to be served only to people ordering food.
August 7, 2020 Schools allowed to open in-person in the fall if certain conditions are met.
August 19, 2020 Ban on ticketed music events at bars and restaurants.
October 1, 2020 Exposure notification apps are added to notify users of potential exposure.
October 1, 2020 The previous ban on ticketed events at bars and restaurants is ruled unconstitutional.
October 6, 2020 Micro-cluster strategy is introduced, with the first micro-clusters being parts of Brooklyn and Queens.
November 12, 2020 Bars, gyms, and any other business with a liquor license must close by 10 p.m. (restaurants as well, except for curbside pickup). Household gatherings limited to ten people.
November 25, 2020 Previous restrictions on capacity through the micro-cluster strategy for places of worship is ruled unconstitutional.
December 8, 2020 Hospital bed capacity statewide is demanded to be upgraded by 25 percent.
June 24, 2021 State of Emergency expires

Vaccination

On January 8, 2021, Governor Cuomo published an initial list of New Yorkers eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.[72]

Phase 1A

Health Care Workers

  • High-risk hospital workers (emergency room workers, ICU staff and Pulmonary Department staff)
  • Federally Qualified Health Center employees
  • Emergency Medical Services (EMS) workers
  • Coroners, medical examiners and certain funeral workers
  • Urgent Care providers
  • People administering COVID-19 vaccines, including local health department staff
  • All Outpatient/Ambulatory frontline, high-risk health care workers of any age who provide direct in-person patient care
  • All staff who are in direct contact with patients (such as reception staff)
  • All frontline, high-risk public health workers who have direct contact with patients, including those conducting COVID-19 tests, handling COVID-19 specimens and COVID-19 vaccinations

This includes, but is not limited to:

  • Doctors who work in private medical practices and their staff
  • Doctors who work in hospital-affiliated medical practices and their staff
  • Doctors who work in public health clinics and their staff
  • Registered Nurses
  • Specialty medical practices of all types
  • Dentists and Orthodontists and their staff
  • Psychiatrists and Psychologists and their staff
  • Physical Therapists and their staff
  • Optometrists and their staff
  • Pharmacists and Pharmacy Aides
  • Home care workers
  • Hospice workers

Residents and Staff in Certain Group Living Facilities

  • Nursing homes and other congregate care facilities
  • NYS Office of Mental Health, Office People with Developmental Disabilities, and Office of Addiction Services and Supports faciilties

Phase 1B as of January, 2021

Older Adults

  • People aged 75 and older

Grocery Workers

  • Public-facing grocery store workers

First Responders and Support Staff for First Responder Agencies

  • Fire Service
    • State Fire Service, including firefighters and investigators (professional and volunteer)
    • Local Fire Services, including firefighters and investigators (professional and volunteer)
  • Police and Investigations
    • State Police, including Troopers
    • State Park Police, DEC Police, Forest Rangers
    • SUNY Police
    • Sheriffs' Offices
    • County Police Departments and Police Districts
    • City, Town and Village Police Departments
    • Transit of other Public Authority Police Departments
    • State Field Investigations, including Department of Motor Vehicles, State Commission of Correction, Justice Center, Department of Financial Services, Inspector General, Department of Tax and Finance, Office of Children and Family Services and State Liquor Authority
  • Public Safety Communications
    • Emergency Communication and Public Safety Answering Point Personnel, including dispatchers and technicians
  • Other Sworn and Civilian Personnel
    • Court Officers
    • Other Police or Peace Officers
    • Support of Civilian Staff for any of the above services, agencies or facilities

Corrections

  • State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision Personnel, including correction and parole officers
  • Local Correctional Facilities, including correction officers
  • Local Probation Departments, including probation officers
  • State Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities
  • Local Juvenile Detention and Rehabilitation Facilities

P-12 Schools, College and Child Care

  • P-12 school or school district faculty or staff (includes all teachers, substitute teachers, student teachers, school administrators, paraprofessional staff and support staff including bus drivers)
  • Contractors working in a P-12 school or school district (including contracted bus drivers)
  • In-person college instructors
  • Licensed, registered, approved or legally exempt group child care
  • Licensed, registered, approved or legally exempt group child care providers
  • Employees or support staff of licensed or registered child care setting
  • Licensed, registered, approved or legally exempt child care providers

Public Transit

  • Airline and airport employees
  • Passenger railroad employees
  • Subway and mass transit employees (MTA, LIRR, Metro North, NYC Transit, Upstate Transit)
  • Ferry employees
  • Port Authority employees
  • Public bus employees

Public facing grocery store workers, including convenience store and bodega workers

Homeless Shelters

  • Individual living in a homeless shelter where sleeping, bathing or eating accommodations must be shared with individuals and families who are not part of your household
  • Individual working (paid or unpaid) in a homeless shelter where sleeping, bathing or eating accommodations must be shared by individuals and families who are not part of the same household, in a position where there is potential for interaction with shelter residents

Other Front Line Workers

  • High-risk hospital and FQHC staff, including OMH psychiatric centers
  • Health care or other high-risk essential staff who come into contact with residents/patients working in LTCFs and long-term, congregate settings overseen by OPWDD, OMH, OCFS, OTDA and OASAS, and residents in congregate living situations, overseen or funded by the OPWDD, OMH, OCFS, OTDA and OASAS
  • Certified NYS EMS provider, including but not limited to Certified First Responder, Emergency Medical Technician, Advanced Emergency Medical Technician, Emergency Medical Technician – Critical Care, Paramedic, Ambulance Emergency Vehicle Operator, or Non-Certified Ambulance Assistant
  • County Coroner or Medical Examiner, or employer or contractor thereof who is exposed to infectious material or bodily fluids
  • Licensed funeral director, or owner, operator, employee, or contractor of a funeral firm licensed and registered in New York State, who is exposed to infectious material or bodily fluids
  • Staff of urgent care provider
  • Staff who administer COVID-19 vaccine
  • All Outpatient/Ambulatory front-line, high-risk health care workers of any age who provide direct in-person patient care, or other staff in a position in which they have direct contact with patients (i.e., intake staff)
  • All front-line, high-risk public health workers who have direct contact with patients, including those conducting COVID-19 tests, handling COVID-19 specimens and COVID-19 vaccinations
  • Home care workers and aides, hospice workers, personal care aides, and consumer-directed personal care workers
  • Staff and residents of nursing homes, skilled nursing facilities, and adult care facilities

Other Workers

  • Restaurant workers
  • Restaurant delivery drivers
  • For-hire vehicle drivers, including taxi, livery, black car, and transportation network company drivers
  • Public facing hotel workers
  • Public-facing government and public employees
  • Not-for-profit workers who provide public-facing services to New Yorkers in need
  • Essential in-person public-facing building service workers

Phase 1C

  • People 65 to 74 (since January 12, 2021),
  • Adult New Yorkers of any age with the following conditions qualify for the vaccine: (started on February 15, 2021)
    • Cancer (current or in remission, including 9/11-related cancers)
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Pulmonary Disease, including but not limited to, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), asthma (moderate-to-severe), pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis, and 9/11 related pulmonary diseases
    • Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities including Down Syndrome
    • Heart conditions, including but not limited to heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathies, or hypertension (high blood pressure)
    • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) including but not limited to solid organ transplant or from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, use of other immune weakening medicines, or other causes
    • Severe Obesity (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2), Obesity (BMI 30–39.9 kg/m2)
    • Pregnancy
    • Sickle cell disease or Thalassemia
    • Type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus
    • Cerebrovascular disease (affects blood vessels and blood supply to the brain)
    • Neurologic conditions including but not limited to Alzheimer's Disease or dementia
    • Liver disease
  • All other essential workers (to be determined by New York State)

Since March 10, 2021, people aged 60 and above can get vaccinated in New York State.

Since March 17, 2021, the following essential workers are also eligible:

  • Public-facing government and public employee
  • Not-for-profit workers who provide public-facing services to New Yorkers in need
  • Essential in-person public-facing building service workers

Since March 23, 2021, people aged 50 and above can get vaccinated in New York State.

Since March 30, 2021, people aged 30 and above can get vaccinated in New York State.[73]

Since April 6, 2021, people aged 16 and above can schedule appointments and get vaccinated in New York State.[73]

Since May 13, 2021, people aged 12 and above can get vaccinated in New York State.

As of September 27, 2021, healthcare workers in New York State will be required to have had at least their first dose of the vaccine.[74]

Vaccinations in NY State Per Week (1st Vaccination) and Time Required from Start of Vaccination to Reach Herd Immunity[75]
Week Number Vaccinated (1st dose)[76] Σ % NY State Population[77] Weeks and Date to Herd Immunity Notes
1/20/2021 907,870 4.7% 75 weeks - May 2022 5 weeks
1/27/2021 1,246,946 6.4% 66 weeks - March 2022 6 weeks
2/3/2021 1,432,195 7.4% 67 weeks - April 2022 7 weeks
2/10/2021 1,738,927 8.9% 63 weeks - March 2022 8 weeks
2/17/2021 2,068,561 10.6% 59 weeks - February 2022 9 weeks
2/24/2021 2,517,003 12.9% 54 weeks - January 2022 10 weeks
3/3/2021 3,125,025 16.1% 48 weeks - November 2021 11 weeks
3/10/2021 3,972,100 20.4% 41 weeks - October 2021 12 weeks
3/17/2021 4,691,257 24.1% 38 weeks - September 2021 13 weeks
3/24/2021 5,373,954 27.6% 35 weeks - August 2021 14 weeks
4/1/2021 6,192,319 31.8% 33 weeks - August 2021 15 weeks
4/7/2021 6,871,863 35.3% 32 weeks - August 2021 16 weeks
4/14/2021 7,811,084 40.2% 30 weeks - July 2021 17 weeks
4/21/2021 8,410,070 43.2% 29 weeks - July 2021 18 weeks
4/28/2021 8,994,649 46.2% 29 weeks - July 2021 19 weeks
5/5/2021 9,421,044 48.4% 29 weeks - July 2021 20 weeks
5/12/2021 9,587,129 49.3% 30 weeks - July 2021 21 weeks
5/19/2021 10,079,911 51.8% 30 weeks - July 2021 22 weeks
5/26/2021 10,486,657 53.9% 30 weeks - July 2021 23 weeks
6/2/2021 10,744,805 55.2% 30 weeks - July 2021 24 weeks
6/9/2021 10,982,582 56.5% 31 weeks - August 2021 25 weeks
6/16/2021 11,200,556 57.6% 32 weeks - August 2021 26 weeks
6/23/2021 11,369,732 58.4% 32 weeks - August 2021 27 weeks
6/30/2021 11,524,279 59.2% 33 weeks - August 2021 28 weeks
7/7/2021 11,644,869 59.9% 34 weeks - August 2021 29 weeks
7/14/2021 11,767,479 60.5% 34 weeks - August 2021 30 weeks
7/21/2021 11,890,620 61.1% 35 weeks - August 2021 31 weeks
7/28/2021 12,008,415 61.7% 36 weeks - September 2021 32 weeks
8/4/2021 12,204,784 62.7% 37 weeks - September 2021 33 weeks
8/11/2021 12,409,680 63.8% 37 weeks - September 2021 34 weeks
8/18/2021 12,609,588 64.8% 38 weeks - September 2021 35 weeks
8/25/2021 12,816,392 65.9% 38 weeks - September 2021 36 weeks
9/08/2021 13,226,742 68.0% 39 weeks - September 2021 38 weeks
9/15/2021 13,403,886 68.9% 40 weeks - September 2021 39 weeks

As a reminder, in excess of 90% of deaths in New York are either people above 60 years of age and people with underlying medical conditions. At the start of NYS vaccination program, there was no clear process for people with underlying medical conditions. Some other countries (e.g., UK) were prioritizing people at highest risk for serious illness or death.[78][79] The situation and decisions started to be altered after February 8, 2021 when the governor agreed to give access to vaccination for people with co-morbidities.[80]

The governor and the mayor have opened new vaccination sites and have manned these sites with anyone who is trained to give shots. It will likely accelerate vaccinations dramatically.[81][82]

As patients with co-morbidities can be vaccinated since February 15, 2021, demand continues to exceed supply of vaccines significantly, stretching appointments into Spring 2021 for the population that can get vaccinated.

At the end of February 2021 the access to vaccination appointment slots remained complicated in NYS.[83][84] The governor of NYS and the mayor of NYC have decided to let separate groups (e.g., Walgreens, medical groups, state or city vaccination campuses) manage their own vaccination schedules. It creates opacity in identifying potential available slots and applying in time to these spots. Phone lines to organize appointments are often not reachable. But Huge Ma,[85] a New York software developer, has created an application that facilitates taking appointments for vaccines in NYS, turbovax.info,[86] which connects to multiple sites offering vaccination appointments. [87]

By the end of February 2021 there is a noticeable acceleration in the number of people getting vaccinated. In addition, the new J&J vaccine was approved on February 28, 2021. Its distribution has been accompanied by longer overnight opening hours at Yankee Stadium, Javits Center and the NY State Fair Grounds.[88]

On March 9, 2021, Governor Cuomo further increased the number of people who can get vaccinated in New York State to include people above 60 years.[89]

Despite efforts at Governor's and NYC's level, the lack of proper organization is strongly felt and has relegated NYS at the 37th position in the US for the number of people vaccinated as updated by Johns Hopkins.[90]

On March 22, 2021, Governor Cuomo lowered the minimum age to be vaccinated to 50 years and pharmacies are allowed to vaccinate almost eligible New Yorkers.[91]

By March 29, 2021, Governor Cuomo extended vaccination population to 30 years old and announced that, as of April 6, everyone 16 years old and above can be vaccinated.[92]

On May 12, 2021, Governor Cuomo announced that vaccination was now open to anyone aged 12 to 17 years old in New York State, in agreement with CDC's recommendations.[93]

Since the beginning of May, the vaccination pace had started to flatten which was likely to increase the time to herd immunity. For example, during the week finishing April 14, New York state registered 939,221 people who received a first vaccination. During the week finishing July 27th, New York State registered 117,795 people who received a first vaccination. It represented an 87.5% reduction.^

Impact on voting

The New York State Democratic presidential primary—along with special elections in the 27th congressional district; the 50th senate district; and the 12th, 31st, and 136th assembly districts—were originally scheduled for April 28. On March 13, 2020, Senator Skoufis proposed legislation to move these elections to June 23. The intent was to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus.[94][95] On March 28, the New York State Board of Elections and Governor Cuomo postponed the elections to June 23.[96][97][98][99] Subsequently, the Democratic presidential primary was canceled altogether, and most of the special elections were postponed until the general election in November.

Democratic presidential primary

On April 27, 2020, the Board of Elections changed its decision, and cancelled the Democratic presidential primary outright, by removing several candidates who suspended their campaigns from the ballot.[100][101][102][103] The decision was first criticized by supporters of presidential candidate, Senator Bernie Sanders, who hoped to secure additional convention delegates, which would allow greater influence in the Democratic Party's platform. Other critics of the decision cited reduced voter turn out for down-ballot races, which unfairly benefits incumbent candidates. New York State Democratic Party Chair, Jay Jacobs, stated "our motivation right now is to avoid what happened in Wisconsin, where we in this situation are holding a primary that asks poll workers, many of them senior citizens, to risk their health for no particular purpose."[104] Despite this move 42 of 62 New York counties, roughly 68% of counties in the New York State, would remain open for voting due to Congressional and State elections. At the time New York was the only state to cancel its presidential primary.[105][106][107]

The decision was overturned on May 5 by Federal District Court Judge Analisa Torres in New York's Southern District, when presidential candidate Andrew Yang filed suit against the Board of Elections, asserting that the decision violated the 1st and 14th Amendments to the United States Constitution. Judge Torres stated "...the Democratic Commissioners' April 27 Resolution removing Yang, Sanders, and eight other Democratic presidential candidates from the ballot deprived them of associational rights under the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution."[108][109][110]

An appeal was filed by the Board of Elections with the US Court of Appeals, Second Circuit. On May 19, it was ruled that the presidential primary could proceed as planned. The Board of Elections Co-chair, Douglas Kellner, said the Board would not pursue further appeals.[111][112]

Absentee voting

On March 22, 2020, Attorney General Leticia James called for automatic absentee voting in the New York Democratic presidential primary.[113] Cuomo later announced that he would investigate if his recently expanded executive powers would allow him to expand absentee ballot access.[114] On April 9, by executive order of the Governor, all New York State residents were granted the right to apply for an absentee ballot using the state's online absentee ballot application in order to facilitate safe voting in the primary elections. As stated in the order, all voters would be required to "check the box for 'Temporary illness or physical disability' with no requirement for in-person signature or appearance to be able to access an absentee ballot."[115] In an effort to ease barriers to access, Cuomo announced on April 24 that postage paid absentee ballot applications would be mailed to all registered voters in the State. Voters can still apply for a ballot online, or opt to vote in person.[115][116]

State and local elections

Filings for independent nominations to petitions were postponed beginning March 31, 2020.[117] On April 25 special elections were cancelled for the 50th senate district, and the 12th, 31st and 136th assembly districts, as well as the Queens Borough President and New York City Council District 37. These vacancies are to be filled in the November General Election. The 27th Congressional district special election was not cancelled.[115]

Effect on communities

Best Buy was only letting a limited number of people into their Union Square store in New York City, March 18, 2020

Lack of enforcement of self-quarantine policies

Self-quarantines for persons who test positive or are symptomatic are not enforced due to a lack of resources. Several New York City area nurses expressed concerns that patients are not complying with self-quarantine guidelines, due to financial necessity or fear of losing their jobs. A New York State Nurses Association board member expressed concern that low-income patients who share rooms with other individuals may not be able to effectively self-isolate at their residences.[118]

Implementation in Hasidic communities

Implementing social distancing has been difficult in some communities dominated by Hasidic Jews. On March 19, 2020, the Orange County village of Kiryas Joel, home to 25,000 Satmar Hasidim, closed all 100 of its synagogues, as well as schools and mikvot, despite the centrality of religious observance in the community. It was estimated that 25–28 percent of its residents had tested positive, including the community's 73-year-old spiritual leader, Grand Rebbe Aaron Teitelbaum.[119][120] On March 27, the county reported that Kiryas Joel, within the town of Palm Tree, had 234 confirmed cases, the most of any municipality in the county.[121]

Some reports suggested that the Hasidic community has generally been slow to implement measures designed to slow the spread of the virus. This reportedly led to one antisemitic incident. On March 23, a car dealership near Kiryas Joel refused to service a resident's car, telling him he had the virus.[122]

An Orthodox Jewish physician, Vladimir Zelenko, who sees patients at his offices in both Kiryas Joel and Monsey, another predominantly Hasidic community in nearby Rockland County, claims that the real infection rate in Kiryas Joel is much higher. This has been disputed by local authorities. Zelenko, who had to self-isolate since he is missing a lung, said in daily YouTube videos that his office treated 500 patients (mostly in Kiryas Joel) for COVID-19, using the combination of hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, and zinc sulfate, which has in some trials yielded positive results in reducing symptoms. Zelenko claimed that 90 percent of the Hasidic community will become infected; the county's health commissioner and the village's emergency services department disputed that, pointing out that it was based on nine positive results out of 14 samples.[122]

By April 9, Palm Tree had reported 428 cases, maintaining its lead among Orange County's municipalities, a lead it lost a week later.[123] Leaders of the surrounding towns and villages repeated an earlier call by county executive Steve Neuhaus for the town to be declared a containment zone as the area of New Rochelle where a cluster had been identified a month earlier had been, a request denied at that time by Cuomo since the stay-at-home order for the entire state was more restrictive. The Orthodox Jewish Public Affairs Council had responded to such pressure by calling on local leadership to "stop scapegoating Jews of KJ when the problem is clearly widespread, and worse, everywhere in [the] county."[124]

On October 12, Hasidic activist and City Council candidate Heshy Tischler was arrested for inciting a riot and unlawful imprisonment. Hundreds marched through the neighborhood of Borough Park, burning masks, chanting "Jewish Lives Matter" and attacking passersby.[125]

Police and crime

At the beginning of March 2020, prior to the confirmation of the first case of COVID-19, and the onset of the coronavirus pandemic in New York City, a 20 percent spike in crime for the first two months of 2020 was reported.[126] After movement in the city became restricted, New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea stated that the pandemic had curtailed crime.[127] At the end of March, Shea said that crime had decreased sharply during the epidemic (other than car theft, which increased markedly), though there is concern that domestic violence was not being reported.[128][129] As of April 8, 2,103 uniformed members and 373 civilian members had tested positive for the virus while 13 had died.[130]

In early April, the state's Division of Criminal Justice Services reported that crime had dropped considerably since late February, both in the city and state compared to the same period the year before. In the city, combined felony and misdemeanor arrests were down 43 percent, with the rest of the state recording a 69 percent drop. Cuomo praised the drop as a result of social distancing, since it helped keep hospitals and first responders free to deal with the pandemic.[131]

Tensions over city residents relocating to rural areas

Some residents of New York City and its inner suburbs who own, or can afford to rent, property in rural areas upstate or on eastern Long Island have aroused local resentment for doing so during the pandemic. Steve McLaughlin, executive of Rensselaer County, east of Albany, asked Cuomo to issue an order banning all non-essential travel upstate from the city, after city residents booked all available local lodging. Seven of 51 cases the county had as of April 2 were city residents, and the county feared it did not have sufficient healthcare infrastructure to handle a large outbreak; McLaughlin issued an order requiring any recent arrivals from the city to quarantine themselves for 14 days, during which law enforcement will check on them regularly.[132]

Similarly, Greene County, in the Catskills just south of Albany, posted on its website a letter asking people to refrain from traveling there, especially from New York City or Westchester. "There is no hospital in Greene County," wrote the chairman of the county legislature. "This limits our ability to serve a large number of people requiring higher levels of care for COVID-19 patients and other illnesses." The legislatures of neighboring Delaware and Sullivan counties made similar requests.[133]

In the Hamptons, on the eastern end of Long Island's South Fork, a longtime summer destination for city residents, rental rates have quadrupled as the population has nearly doubled. While many year-round residents are aware that the towns' economy depends on seasonal residents, they believe their resources have been stretched to the limit. "People need to stop coming out east. We're full," one woman wrote on a local newspaper's Facebook page.[132]

New York renters and homeowners

Cuomo initially announced a state moratorium for both residential and commercial evictions on March 20, 2020. This moratorium was an attempt to prevent evictions during the height of the COVID-19 public health emergency.[134] He then signed the Tenant Safe Harbor Act, which had passed the New York State Senate and New York State Assembly on May 27, into law on June 30.[135] The Tenant Safe Harbor Act gave an additional layer of protection to tenants experiencing financial hardship during the public health emergency, as it prevented courts from ever evicting on the basis of non-payment that accrued or came due during the COVID-19 period.[135] Previously, a tenant who was unable to pay rent could be evicted on the basis of non-payment as soon as the moratorium ended.[135] On September 28, Cuomo announced the Tenant Safe Harbor Act would be extended and expanded through January 1, 2021.[134]

In addition to the Tenant Safe Harbor Act, Cuomo signed the COVID-19 Emergency Eviction and Foreclosure Prevention Act of 2020 into effect on December 28.[136] This piece of legislation further safeguards New York renters and homeowners and ensures they can remain in their homes.[137] The Act suspends residential eviction and residential foreclosure proceedings until May 1, 2021, and allows renters and homeowners to submit a declaration of hardship.[137] The Act also prevents credit discrimination, and negative credit reporting due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[136]

Impact on sports

Most of the state's sports teams were affected. Major League Baseball cancelled the remainder of spring training on March 12, 2020 and on March 16 it announced that the season will be postponed indefinitely, after the recommendation from the CDC to restrict events of more than 50 people for the next eight weeks, affecting the New York Yankees and New York Mets.[138] The National Basketball Association suspended the season for 30 days starting March 12, affecting the New York Knicks and Brooklyn Nets.[139] The National Hockey League season was suspended indefinitely on March 12, affecting the New York Rangers, New York Islanders, and Buffalo Sabres.[140] Major League Soccer postponed the season for 30 days starting March 12, affecting the New York Red Bulls and New York City FC.[141] On March 12, the National Lacrosse League postponed the remainder of their season until further notice, affecting the seasons of the Buffalo Bandits, Rochester Knighthawks, and New York Riptide.[142] The XFL suspended its season on March 12, affecting the inaugural season of the New York Guardians.[143]

In college sports, the National Collegiate Athletic Association cancelled all winter and spring tournaments, most notably the Division I men's and women's basketball tournaments, affecting colleges and universities statewide.[144] On March 16, the National Junior College Athletic Association also canceled the remainder of the winter seasons as well as the spring seasons.[145]

The state's high school basketball playoffs had begun in early March with no spectators allowed. On March 12, the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) suspended remaining winter sports championship contests in all sports that still had not decided them: boys' and girls' basketball, ice hockey, and bowling.[146]

On March 17, four members of the Brooklyn Nets, including Kevin Durant, were confirmed positive for COVID-19.[147]

A little over a month later, NYSPSHSAA announced that Sections 8 and 11, which cover all of Long Island's high schools, had voted to cancel all spring high school and middle school sports seasons. "It was not an easy [decision] to make," said Section 11 executive director Tom Combs, "however, in what the world is experiencing at this time, it is the most reasonable and prudent decision to make." The other nine sections of the state, in areas which in some cases were not experiencing the pandemic so severely, had not made decisions yet and were still planning for the possibility of a short spring season at the end of May and in early June. Championships for any spring sports, were they to be held, would likely have to be moved to other locations since they had been scheduled to be played on Long Island;[148] on April 27, they were canceled.[149]

At the beginning of May, when Cuomo announced that the remainder of the school year in the state was canceled, all remaining contingency plans for spring high school sports statewide were canceled as well.[150]

In mid-May, Cuomo announced that horse racing statewide and auto races at Watkins Glen International in Schuyler County may resume, with no spectators allowed, at the beginning of June.[151] The NASCAR race weekend scheduled for Watkins Glen International in August was cancelled due to New York's 14-day quarantine requirement for out-of-state travelers coming from states with a high rate of COVID-19 cases; this includes North Carolina and Florida, where many drivers and teams in NASCAR are based. The race weekend at Watkins Glen International was replaced by the road course at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona Beach, Florida.[152]

On June 20, Cuomo announced that the Yankees and the Mets baseball teams would move from conducting spring training in Florida to New York. The Yankees will be at Yankee Stadium and the Mets at Citi Field. Cuomo added that, "[...] we've determined it's possible for the Yankees and the Mets to safely conduct spring training in the state this year and are thrilled to begin reopening America's national pastime right here in New York."[153]

On July 24, Governor Cuomo virtually officiated the start of the Mets home opener at Citi Stadium against the Atlanta Braves with no fans in attendance.[154]

On July 31, the Yankees held their home opener game at Yankee Stadium against the Boston Red Sox with no fans in attendance.[155][156]

On August 31, the 2020 US Open (tennis) kicked off with various safety precautions and void of spectators due to COVID-19, for the first time in the tournament's history.[157]

Impact on outdoor recreation

The ban on large gatherings meant that the annual "First Cast" ceremony at the Junction Pool, a popular fly fishing spot, in the Sullivan County hamlet of Roscoe, marking the April 1 opening of trout season, could not be held. The season still opened and the state's Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) encouraged anglers to take to the state's streams as long as they continued to practice social distancing. Many stores in Roscoe that catered to them were nevertheless closed and limited to filling orders online.[158] Anglers in Central New York reported that day that they were able to easily maintain social distancing while in the waters of Ninemile Creek, a practice necessary to the sport in any event since it prevented them from getting their lines tangled with each other. They appreciated the opportunity to get outside on a day with good weather for fishing and forget the pandemic, and some told the Syracuse Post-Standard they had good catches as well.[159]

DEC announced on April 7 that the state's spring wild turkey hunting season in May, and the youth turkey weekend at the end of April, were still going on. It advised hunters, in addition to the usual hunting safety practices, to continue social distancing while hunting and take other measures, such as buying supplies online and hunting close to home. Hunters were further advised to share blinds with other hunters only if they lived in the same residence, and to hunt alone where possible.[160]

Park closures and use restrictions

As of June 4, 2020, Seabreeze in Irondequoit and other amusement parks around the state remain closed.[161]

On April 7, 2020, Rockland and Sullivan counties closed their parks. Residents had been making heavy use of them during the lockdown, making it difficult to enforce social distancing. The closures will last for two weeks and be re-evaluated at the end of that period.[162][163] A week later the Palisades Interstate Park Commission (PIPC) closed Nyack Beach and Rockland Lake state parks in Rockland County; local and county government officials had urged the move since the parks had grown crowded with visitors on recent warm days after the county and its towns closed their own parks. "While this is a tough call it is the right thing to do short term," said county executive Ed Day, who said the decision would be reviewed in two weeks.[164]

On April 9, Cuomo removed golf courses, boat launches and marinas from the list of essential businesses allowed to remain open, forcing all courses in the state of New York to close until at least April 29.[165] The move was a result of New Jersey and Pennsylvania having ordered courses to close, resulting in crowding at New York's courses near borders with those states. On April 18, Empire State Development modified that order to allow courses to open as long as no employees such as caddies were on the course, meaning golfers must carry their own bags and cannot use carts;[166] three weeks later that order was again modified to allow the use of carts as a reasonable accommodation for disabled golfers, per the Americans with Disabilities Act.[167]

The Rockland County park closures were supplemented April 24 by the PIPC's closure of all roads through Bear Mountain and Harriman state parks, where the Anthony Wayne Recreation Area has been serving as a testing site, save Seven Lakes Drive, and exits that led to those roads from Palisades Interstate Parkway, in not only Rockland but neighboring Orange County. Trail shelters were also closed, although backpackers were still allowed to set up camp within 300 ft (91 m) of the shelters. Permitholders are still allowed to boat on the parks' lakes; sales of new permits are suspended through May 7.[168]

Signs at Awosting Falls trailhead in Minnewaska State Park Preserve

In Ulster County, parking lots at Minnewaska State Park Preserve in the Shawangunks have been limited to 50 percent of capacity to prevent overcrowding. All recreational activities within the park other than foot travel and motorless bicycling have been prohibited, including climbing and bouldering. Restrooms within the park have been closed as well.[169]

In Dutchess, Putnam and Westchester counties, many popular trails and trailheads alongside the Hudson River in Hudson Highlands State Park have been closed since hikers arriving by car or Metro-North's Hudson Line trains must walk on the side of narrow roads and thus cannot keep six feet apart. Among them are all trails on Breakneck Ridge and Bull Hill north of Cold Spring.[170]

In the Catskill Mountains, DEC announced April 5 it was closing the trail and viewing platforms at Kaaterskill Falls in Greene County, which also attract many hikers to a small space.[171] All fire towers on state land in the Catskill Park have been closed.[172] DEC has also suspended overnight camping at easily accessible and popular locations around the state, and stopped issuing permits for backcountry camping by groups larger than 10, or for more than three days.[173]

New York City's Department of Environmental Protection, which operates the reservoirs of the city's water supply system, announced that recreational boating season on its four Catskill reservoirs, which normally begins May 1, will be postponed to May 23. Fishing from rowboats and the shoreline is still permitted.[174]

Statistics

Initially, under Governor Cuomo, New York state counted only those COVID-19 deaths that occurred in hospitals, nursing homes, and adult care facilities. This excluded people who died at home or in other locations. Following Cuomo's resignation, beginning on August 24, 2021, New York State began using the death certificate data provided to the CDC, which includes deaths in any location within the state. This increased New York State's death toll by nearly 12,000; the newly totaled number of deaths up to that point was 55,395.[175]


County [a] Cases [b][c] Deaths [c] Recov. [c][d] Pop.[176] Cases
/100k
Deaths
/100k
Deaths
/Case %
Ref.
62 / 62 385,142 24,629 310,991 19,453,561 1,979.8 126.6 6.39
Albany 1,986 108 1,457 305,506 556.5 30.4 5.47 [177]
Allegany 58 2 41 46,430 124.9 4.3 3.45
Bronx 46,778 3,295 1,418,207 3,242.1 229.7 7.08 [e]
Broome 657 56 489 190,488 236.8 20.5 8.65 [178]
Cattaraugus 145 4 100 76,117 161.6 5.3 3.25 [179]
Cayuga 106 2 51 76,576 94 2.6 1.89
Chautauqua 127 7 110 126,903 100.1 5.5 5.51 [180]
Chemung 138 3 117 83,456 165.4 2.4 1.45
Chenango 139 6 132 47,207 250 6.4 2.54 [181]
Clinton 101 4 94 80,485 125.5 5 3.96
Columbia 442 47 374 59,461 743.3 79 10.63 [182]
Cortland 5,758 74 5,527 47,581 107.2 2.1 1.96 [183]
Delaware 89 3 75 44,135 165.4 4.5 2.74 [184]
Dutchess 4,179 151 3,844 294,218 1,420.4 51.3 3.61 [185]
Erie 7,206 569 479 918,702 784.4 61.9 7.9 [186]
Essex 40 0 8 36,885 97.6 0 0
Franklin 25 0 4 50,022 38 0 0
Fulton 236 26 0 53,383 348.4 28.1 8.06
Genesee 237 5 151 57,280 413.8 8.7 2.11 [187]
Greene 252 13 116 47,188 455.6 25.4 5.58
Hamilton 6 1 0 4,416 113.2 22.6 20
Herkimer 128 3 18 61,319 151.7 4.9 3.23
Jefferson 82 0 9 109,834 64.6 0 0
Kings 58,386 4,984 2,559,903 2,231.8 192.5 8.63 [f]
Lewis 57 5 52 26,296 68.5 19 27.78
Livingston 126 8 116 62,914 181.2 12.7 6.35 [188]
Madison 407 9 385 70,941 414.4 9.9 2.38 [189]
Manhattan 27,708 2,048 1,628,706 1,668.7 125.1 7.5 [g]
Monroe 3,676 243 2,772 741,770 495.6 32.8 6.61 [190]
Montgomery 104 4 43 49,221 156.4 8.1 5.19
Nassau 41,320 2,171 3,786 1,356,924 3,014.5 157.9 5.24 [191]
Niagara 1,373 85 1,233 209,281 588.7 40.6 6.9 [192]
Oneida 1,990 93 1,628 228,671 652.9 40.7 6.23 [193]
Onondaga 3,259 194 2,779 460,528 384.6 20.2 5.25 [194]
Ontario 254 26 47 109,777 231.4 23.7 10.24
Orange 10,599 394 384,940 2,731.3 100.3 3.67 [195]
Orleans 280 53 108 40,352 693.9 131.3 18.93 [187]
Oswego 233 4 224 117,124 165.6 3.4 2.06 [196]
Otsego 82 4 67 59,493 112.6 6.7 5.97 [181]
Putnam 1,626 63 1,254 98,320 1,341.5 64.1 4.78 [197]
Queens 64,176 5,011 2,253,858 2,793.6 220.2 7.88 [h]
Rensselaer 593 30 523 158,714 373.6 18.9 5.06 [198]
Richmond 13,893 740 476,143 2,880.9 154.4 5.36 [i]
Rockland 13,467 506 4,975 325,789 4,090.1 154.1 3.77 [199]
Saratoga 541 17 511 107,740 502.1 15.8 3.14 [200]
Schenectady 786 35 714 229,863 341.9 15.2 4.45 [201]
Schoharie 55 2 51 155,299 35.4 1.3 3.64 [181]
Schuyler 23 0 23 17,685 56.5 0 0
Seneca 58 3 52 17,807 292 11.2 3.85
St. Lawrence 215 3 48 34,016 573.3 5.9 1.03
Steuben 264 29 232 95,379 276.8 30.4 10.98 [202]
Suffolk 40,770 1,958 6,004 1,476,601 2,731.2 130.8 4.79 [203]
Sullivan 1,443 35 1,358 75,432 1,698.2 46.4 2.43 [204]
Tioga 140 19 49 48,203 242.7 33.2 13.68
Tompkins 167 0 165 102,180 163.4 0 0 [205]
Ulster 1,744 80 1,695 177,573 892 39.4 4.42 [206]
Warren 268 33 264 63,944 376.9 42.2 11.2
Washington 250 14 212 61,204 362.7 22.9 6.31
Wayne 137 2 74 89,918 115.7 2.2 1.92 [207]
Westchester 34,385 1,407 21,427 967,506 3,509.4 143.9 4.1 [208]
Wyoming 95 5 63 39,859 238.3 12.5 5.26
Yates 54 7 45 24,913 188.7 28.1 14.89 [209]
Updated September 2, 2020
Data is publicly reported by New York State Department of Health[210]
  1. ^ County where individuals with a positive case was diagnosed. Location of original infection may vary.
  2. ^ Reported cases includes presumptive and confirmed case. Actual case numbers are probably higher.
  3. ^ a b c "–" denotes that no data is currently available for that county, not that the value is zero.
  4. ^ NYSHD is not providing recovered case numbers. Local health departments could be providing this information at their discretion.
  5. ^ Coterminous with The Bronx, one of New York City's five boroughs
  6. ^ Coterminous with Brooklyn, one of New York City's five boroughs
  7. ^ Coterminous with Manhattan, one of New York City's five boroughs.
  8. ^ Coterminous with Queens, one of New York City's five boroughs.
  9. ^ Coterminous with Staten Island, one of New York City's five boroughs
New York (state) case density by county
County Cases[211] Deaths[211] Cases
/mil
Deaths
/mil
Deaths
/case %
Case dens.
/mi2
Population[212] Pop. dens.
/mi2
Area
mi2
[213]
Case dens.
/km2
Pop. dens.
/km2
Area
km2
[213]
Statewide 2,781,257 58,735 50,079 1,544 3.1 30.5 19,453,561 413 47,126 11.7 159 122,057
Albany County 28,439 376 5,937.69 324.1 5.46 2.36 305,506 573 533 0.91 221 1,380
Allegany County 2,956 81 759.4 43.4 5.71 0.03 46,091 45 1,034 0.01 17 2,678
Bronx County 186,323 6,626 31,712 2,264 7.14 677.62 1,418,207 24,695 57.43 261.18 9,518 149
Broome County 21,557 384 1,721.90 115.5 6.71 0.46 190,488 266 715 0.18 103 1,852
Cattaraugus County 6,490 105 696.3 26.3 3.77 0.04 76,117 58 1,310 0.02 22 3,393
Cayuga County 6,256 89 679.1 13.1 1.92 0.06 76,576 89 864 0.02 34 2,238
Chautauqua County 10,182 155 283.7 7.9 2.78 0.02 126,903 85 1,500 0.01 33 3,885
Chemung County 8,772 142 1,497.80 12 0.8 0.3 83,456 203 410.81 0.12 78 1,064
Chenango County 3,512 77 2,097.10 21.2 1.01 0.11 47,207 53 898.85 0.04 20 2,328
Clinton County 6,396 37 770.3 49.7 6.45 0.06 80,485 72 1,118 0.02 28 2,896
Columbia County 4,805 110 3,649.50 252.3 6.91 0.33 59,461 92 648 0.13 35 1,67
Cortland County 4,493 63 672.5 21 3.13 0.06 47,581 95 502 0.02 37 1,300
Delaware County 2,434 52 1,654 45.3 2.74 0.05 44,135 30 1,468 0.02 12 3,802
Dutchess County 35,117 496 10,488.80 254.9 3.15 5.88 294,218 357 825 1.44 138 2,137
Erie County 100,521 2,010 4,038.30 291.7 7.22 3.02/mi2 918,702 749 1,227 1.17 289 3,178
Essex County 1,672 28 786.2 0 0 0.02/mi2 36,885 19 1,916 0.01 7 4,962
Franklin County 2,772 17 299.9 0 0 0.01/mi2 50,022 29 1,697 0 11 4,395
Fulton County 3,170 80 1,536.10 56.2 3.66 0.15/mi2 53,383 100 533 0.06 39 1,380
Genesee County 5,323 124 2,706 52.4 1.94 0.31/mi2 57,280 116 495 0.12 45 1,282
Greene County 4,143 84 3,200 63.6 1.99 0.23/mi2 47,188 72 658 0.09 28 1,704
Hamilton County 318 2 679.3 0 0 0/mi2 4,416 2 1,808 0 1 4,683
Herkimer County 6,194 103 1,011.10 48.9 4.84 0.04/mi2 61,319 42 1,458 0.02 16 3,776
Jefferson County 7,289 87 564.5 0 0 0.03/mi2 109,834 59 1,857 0.01 23 4,810
Kings County (Brooklyn) 297,666 9,754 21,659.4 1,664.90 9.1 483.37/mi2 2,559,903 26,418 96.9 186.61 10.199 251
Lewis County 2,401 31 342.3 152.1 44.44 0.01/mi2 26,296 20 1,290 0 8 3,341
Livingston County 4,717 46 1,319.30 31.8 2.41 0.13/mi2 62,914 98 640 0.05 38 1,658
Madison County 4,585 91 2,551.40 70.5 2.76 0.27/mi2 70,941 107 662 0.11 41 1,715
New York County (Manhattan) 151,721 4,240 16,258 1,233 7.58 1081/mi2 1,628,706 71,341 22.83 417.39 27,545 59.13
Monroe County 75,117 1,226 2,111.2 157.7 7.47 1.15/mi2 741,770 543 1,366 0.44 210 3,538
Montgomery County 4,262 107 1,137.7 81.3 7.14 0.14/mi2 49,221 120 410 0.05 46 1,062
Nassau County 193,324 3,198 27,105.4 1,304.40 4.81 81.19/mi2 1,356,924 2,995 453 31.36 1,157 1,173
Niagara County 20,811 369 2,331.8 124.2 5.33 0.43/mi2 209,281 184 1,140 0.17 71 2,953
Oneida County 21,913 432 2,138.4 78.7 3.68 0.4/mi2 228,671 189 1,213 0.16 73 3,142
Onondaga County 43,526 700 2,273.5 78.2 3.44 1.3/mi2 460,528 571 806 0.5 221 2,088
Ontario County 7,376 107 865.4 82 9.47 0.14/mi2 109,777 166 662 0.06 64 1,715
Orange County 56,697 903 23,479 854.7 4.38 10.77/mi2 384,940 459 839 4.16 177 2,173
Orleans County 3,091 83 2,403.8 223 9.28 0.12/mi2 40,352 49 817 0.05 19 2,116
Oswego County 6,111 88 563.5 25.6 4.55 0.05/mi2 117,124 89 1,312 0.02 34 3,398
Otsego County 4,487 63 1,126.2 67.2 5.97 0.07/mi2 59,493 59 1,003 0.03 23 2,598
Putnam County 12,290 96 11,635.5 457.7 3.93 4.65/mi2 98,320 400 246 1.8 154 637
Queens County 289,839 9,378 27,350 2,177.2 7.96 570.25/mi2 2,253,858 20,850 108.1 220.2 8.050 280
Rensselaer County 13,522 155 2,028.8 88.2 4.35 0.48/mi2 158,714 239 665 0.19 92 1,722
Richmond County 81,655 1,706 28,258.32 1,520.6 5.38 351.04/mi2 476,143 4,645 102.5 135.78 1,797 265
Rockland County 52,558 970 40,136.41 1,593.1 3.97 60.43/mi2 325,789 1,637 199 23.35 633 515
Saratoga County 18,846 191 3,369.2 120.7 3.58 0.43/mi2 107,740 128 844 0.17 49 2,186
Schenectady County 15,387 217 2,292.7 108.8 4.74 2.51/mi2 229,863 1,095 210 0.97 423 544
Schoharie County 1,705 18 289.8 6.4 2.22 0.07/mi2 155,299 248 626 0.03 96 1,621
Schuyler County 877 12 258.1 0 0 0.02/mi2 30,999 91 342 0.01 35 886
Seneca County 1,595 62 2,527.1 112.3 4.44 0.14/mi2 17,807 55 325 0.05 21 842
St. Lawrence County 7,626 97 5,203.4 58.8 1.13 0.06/mi2 34,016 12 2,821 0.02 5 7,306
Steuben County 8,013 188 2,453.4 398.4 16.24 0.17/mi2 95,379 68 1,404 0.06 26 3,636
Suffolk County 209,080 3,457 23,604.9 850.6 3.6 14.69/mi2 1,476,601 622 2,373 5.67 240 6,146
Sullivan County 8,138 82 12,607.4 291.7 2.31 0.95/mi2 75,432 76 997 0.37 29 2,582
Tioga County 3,906 80 1,867.1 166 8.89 0.17/mi2 48,203 92 523 0.07 36 1,355
Tompkins County 4,335 31 1,262.5 0 0 0.27/mi2 102,180 215 476 0.1 83 1,233
Ulster County 16,848 275 7,889.7 157.7 2 1.21/mi2 177,573 153 1,161 0.47 59 3,007
Warren County 5,123 81 2,940.1 156.4 5.32 0.22/mi2 63,944 73 870 0.08 28 2,253
Washington County 2,833 38 3,039 81.7 2.69 0.22/mi2 61,204 72 846 0.08 28 2,191
Wayne County 5,334 50 834.1 11.1 1.33 0.05/mi2 89,918 65 1,384 0.02 25 3,585
Westchester County 134,167 2,324 34,411 1,404.6 4.1 59.25/mi2 967,506 1,935 500 22.88 747 1,295
Wyoming County 2,763 52 1,731.1 125.4 7.25 0.12/mi2 39,859 67 596 0.04 26 1,544
Yates County 1,091 25 722.5 40.1 5.56 0.05/mi2 24,913 66 376 0.02 26 974
Updated May 4, 2020

Demographics

Following a USA Today article in early April suggesting the states could release demographic breakdowns of victims, New York published information on the age of those who had died of COVID-19. Nearly two-thirds of the dead were over 60 years old. It also included a breakdown by county, information that in some cases differed with that released by the individual county health departments.[214] Later data showed that 61 percent of the dead were men, that 86 percent had underlying health conditions such as hypertension and diabetes that are known to increase the possibility that COVID-19 will be fatal,[215] and that African American and Latino patients in the state outside of the New York City accounted for a greater share of the deaths from the disease than their share of the overall population (data from New York City was not available at the time).[216] Demographics of COVID-19 fatalities continue to be updated on the state's COVID-19 tracker website.

Graphs

Note: As the New York State Department of Health is not reporting data in compliance with CDC recommendations,[217][218] the below charts use only data validated by Johns Hopkins University.[219]

Daily cases

Daily deaths

Note: Per NYDOH, the spike for June 30 in the above chart is due to a comprehensive accounting of current and retrospective data, provided by nursing homes and adult care facilities. These data capture COVID-19 confirmed and COVID-19 presumed deaths within these facilities. These data do not reflect COVID-19 confirmed or COVID-19 presumed positive deaths that occurred outside of the facility. This number includes retrospective data from reporting that dates back to March 1, 2020.[220]

Total cases

Total deaths

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Zimmer, Carl (April 8, 2020). "Most New York Coronavirus Cases Came From Europe, Genomes Show". New York Times. Archived from the original on April 10, 2020. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c West, Melanie Grayce (March 2, 2020). "First Case of Coronavirus Confirmed in New York State". The Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Archived from the original on March 3, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e "New York State Overview". Retrieved February 22, 2021.
  4. ^ "Operations Dashboard for ArcGIS". Archived from the original on September 5, 2019. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  5. ^ "New York". The COVID Tracking Project. Archived from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  6. ^ "Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center". December 9, 2020. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  7. ^ de Freytas-Tamura, Kimiko (July 12, 2020). "Florida Breaks U.S. Coronavirus Record for Most New Cases in a Day". The New York Times.
  8. ^ Dzhanova, Yelena (April 10, 2020). "New York state now has more coronavirus cases than any country outside the US". CNBC. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  9. ^ "outbreak.info". outbreak.info. Retrieved March 3, 2021.
  10. ^ Sidner, Sarah; Kravarik, Jason (July 22, 2020). "After bending the curve, California has overtaken New York for the most Covid-19 cases". CNN. Retrieved July 22, 2020.
  11. ^ "California overtakes New York for most confirmed Covid-19 cases in US". France 24. July 22, 2020. Retrieved July 22, 2020.
  12. ^ "Coronavirus in the U.S.: Latest Map and Case Count". The New York Times. Retrieved May 12, 2020.
  13. ^ Schumaker, Erin (June 11, 2020). "Ominous sign? Of the 14 states with rising new coronavirus cases, Arizona has experts especially worried". ABC News. Retrieved June 14, 2020.
  14. ^ "New York has lowest U.S. coronavirus infection rate, Cuomo says". Reuters. June 17, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  15. ^ "Coronavirus Updates: More than 1,000 NYers test positive for 1st time since June". ABC7 New York. September 26, 2020.
  16. ^ "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Archived from the original on March 2, 2020. Retrieved September 26, 2020.
  17. ^ "ArcGIS Dashboards". Johns Hopkins University. Archived from the original on May 21, 2020. Retrieved September 26, 2020.
  18. ^ "Coronavirus (COVID-19) U.S. Deaths". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved September 26, 2020.
  19. ^ "Andrew Cuomo faces a reckoning for a pandemic-related cover-up". The Economist. February 20, 2021. Archived from the original on February 22, 2021. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
  20. ^ "New York - COVID-19 Overview - Johns Hopkins". Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. Retrieved August 2, 2021.
  21. ^ Rabin, Roni Caryn (March 19, 2020). "They Fled Coronavirus in Europe. Border Agents Asked if They'd Visited China or Iran". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 24, 2020. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  22. ^ Carey, Benedict; Glanz, James (April 23, 2020). "Hidden Outbreaks Spread Through U.S. Cities Far Earlier Than Americans Knew, Estimates Say". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on April 24, 2020. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  23. ^ Yan, Holly; Sgueglia, Kristina (March 2, 2020). "New York's first case of coronavirus is a health care worker, and officials say more cases are 'inevitable'". CNN. Archived from the original on March 4, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  24. ^ Bendix, Aria (March 7, 2020). "At least 28 coronavirus cases in New York are linked to one man — a 50-year-old attorney who works near Grand Central Terminal. Here's what we know". Business Insider. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  25. ^ Goldstein, Joseph; McKinley, Jesse (March 4, 2020). "Second Case of Coronavirus in N.Y. Sets Off Search for Others Exposed". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  26. ^ Algar, Selim; Hogan, Bernadette; Henry, Jacob; Steinbuch, Yaron (March 3, 2020). "New York confirms second coronavirus case as Jewish schools close over virus fears". New York Post. Archived from the original on March 3, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  27. ^ Misdary, Rosemary; Roberts, Georgett (March 4, 2020). "NYC shoppers panic with second case of coronavirus confirmed". New York Post. Archived from the original on March 5, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  28. ^ Hogan, Bernadette; Marsh, Julia; Feis, Aaron (March 4, 2020). "Five more New York coronavirus cases confirmed, bringing state total to 11". New York Post. Archived from the original on March 8, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  29. ^ Parnell, Wes; Shahrigian, Shant (March 5, 2020). "Mayor de Blasio says coronavirus fears shouldn't keep New Yorkers off subways". Daily News. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  30. ^ "Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) NY Dept of Public Health March 6th update". March 6, 2020. Archived from the original on March 6, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  31. ^ Millman, Jennifer (March 7, 2020). "New York COVID-19 Cases Surge to 45; Dozens Under Mandatory Quarantine Order". NBC New York. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  32. ^ Cuomo, Andrew (March 6, 2020). "Update: We have learned of 11 new confirmed cases of #Coronavirus in NYS — bringing the total number of cases to 44. -8 of the new new cases are in Westchester County −3 of the new cases are in Nassau County We have expected the number of positive cases to go up as we test".
  33. ^ Marsh, Julia (March 20, 2020). "City Hall didn't secure 1st order of COVID-19 supplies for NYC until March 6". New York Post. Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  34. ^ "Coronavirus in N.Y.: Cuomo Declares State of Emergency". The New York Times. March 3, 2020. Archived from the original on March 9, 2020.
  35. ^ Freytas-Tamura, Kimiko de (March 8, 2020). "Coronavirus in N.Y.: Cuomo Attacks C.D.C. Over Delays in Testing". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on March 9, 2020. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  36. ^ "NYC Issues New Commuter Guidelines to Combat Coronavirus Spread". NBC New York. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  37. ^ "Mayor: 16 Coronavirus Cases Confirmed in City". ny1.com. Retrieved March 9, 2020.
  38. ^ "N.Y. Creates 'Containment Zone' in New Rochelle". nytimes.com. Archived from the original on March 10, 2020. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  39. ^ "CUNY and SUNY Classes Will Be Held Online Because of Coronavirus". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 11, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  40. ^ "1st confirmed case of coronavirus in Monroe County, St. Patrick's Day Parade suspended". RochesterFirst. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  41. ^ Dahlberg, Brett. "Rochester coronavirus rode Greyhound here from NYC". City Newspaper. Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  42. ^ "Albany County says there are 2 confirmed cases of coronavirus". WRGB. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  43. ^ "Union College staff member tests positive for coronavirus". WTEN. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved March 12, 2020.
  44. ^ "Individual test positive for coronavirus in Herkimer County". Times Telegram. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  45. ^ Croft, Jay. "First coronavirus-related death reported in New York". CNN. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  46. ^ "New York Reports 2nd COVID-19 Death as Tri-State Cases Surpass 600; New U.S. Travel Limits in Place". NBC New York. March 14, 2020. Archived from the original on March 16, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  47. ^ "3 Erie County residents test positive for coronavirus, Cuomo says". WGRZ. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  48. ^ McKenna, Chris (March 13, 2020). "Schools closed in Orange, Ulster counties for 2 weeks due to coronavirus". Times-Herald Record. Middletown, New York. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  49. ^ "Coronavirus Update: 3rd Death Linked To COVID-19, 79-Year-Old In New York City". CBS New York. March 15, 2020. Archived from the original on March 15, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  50. ^ Izzo, Elizabeth (March 16, 2020). "North Country's first COVID-19 case confirmed at Plattsburgh hospital". Adirondack Daily Enterprise. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  51. ^ "Virus Cases Approaching 21,000 in N.Y.C." The New York Times. March 24, 2020. Archived from the original on March 24, 2020. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  52. ^ "Cuomo previews the Javits Center's overhaul into a coronavirus hospital complex". March 23, 2020. Archived from the original on March 24, 2020. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  53. ^ "NY governor says infection rate worse than feared". BBC News. March 24, 2020. Archived from the original on March 24, 2020. Retrieved March 24, 2020.
  54. ^ 211 NYPD officers, civilian members test positive for coronavirus; 7.6 percent of workforce out sick Archived March 25, 2020, at the Wayback Machine By Michael Ruiz, Fox News, 24 Mar 2020
  55. ^ says, Paul Ghiron (March 24, 2020). "Coronavirus Update: Westchester County Cases Nearing 4,000, Due In Part To Aggressive Testing". Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  56. ^ "Hospital Cleaner Looks At Coronavirus Pandemic As A Chance To Give Back To Her Community". www.wbur.org. Archived from the original on May 4, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  57. ^ Andone, Dakin (March 26, 2020). "New York will allow two patients to share a single ventilator". CNN. Archived from the original on March 26, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  58. ^ "100 Deaths From Coronavirus in N.Y. in One Day: Live Updates". The New York Times. March 26, 2020. Archived from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  59. ^ "Website charts COVID-19 spread across NY state". Cornell Chronicle. April 22, 2020. Archived from the original on April 26, 2020. Retrieved May 7, 2020.
  60. ^ Price, Brian (January 4, 2021). "Cuomo Confirms 1st Case of New, More Contagious U.K. Strain of Virus in New York". WNBC-TV. Retrieved January 4, 2021.
  61. ^ B.1.1.7 Lineage Report. Alaa Abdel Latif, Karthik Gangavarapu, Emily Haag, Nate Matteson, Julia L. Mullen, Ginger Tsueng, Mark Zeller, Chunlei Wu, Andrew I. Su, Laura D. Hughes, Kristian G. Andersen, and the Center for Viral Systems Biology. outbreak.info, (available at https://outbreak.info/situation-reports?pango=B.1.1.7). Accessed 2 March 2021.
  62. ^ Gold, Michael (July 22, 2021). "31 Children Test Positive for Coronavirus at Summer Camp". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 9, 2021. Retrieved August 10, 2021.
  63. ^ "City Hall didn't secure 1st order of COVID-19 supplies for NYC until March 6". March 20, 2020. Archived from the original on March 21, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  64. ^ "NYC first responders resent lack of coronavirus equipment". March 21, 2020. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  65. ^ "Police union files complaint with state over alleged NYPD failure to issue personal protective gear to cops during coronavirus outbreak". March 13, 2020. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved March 22, 2020.
  66. ^ Confessore, Nicholas; Jacobs, Andrew; Kantor, Jodi; Kanno-Youngs, Zolan; Ferré-Sadurní, Luis (May 5, 2020). "How Kushner's Volunteer Force Led a Fumbling Hunt for Medical Supplies". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 6, 2020.
  67. ^ Watkins, Ali (March 28, 2020). "N.Y.C.'s 911 System Is Overwhelmed. 'I'm Terrified,' a Paramedic Says". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 31, 2020. Retrieved March 29, 2020.
  68. ^ "Private Labs Are Fueling a New Coronavirus Testing Crisis". March 31, 2020. Archived from the original on April 8, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  69. ^ "COVID-19 Testing – New York Department of Health". April 13, 2020. Archived from the original on April 14, 2020. Retrieved April 13, 2020.
  70. ^ McKinley, Jesse; Nir, Sarah Maslin (March 10, 2020). "'Containment Area' Is Ordered for New Rochelle Coronavirus Cluster". The New York Times. Retrieved October 10, 2020.
  71. ^ a b Francescani, Chris (June 17, 2020). "Timeline: The first 100 days of New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's COVID-19 response From the state's first case on March 1 to New York City's initial reopening". ABC News. Retrieved October 10, 2020.
  72. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces Expanded Vaccination Network To Accelerate Distribution of COVID-19 Vaccine". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  73. ^ a b "Governor Cuomo Announces New Yorkers 30 Years of Age and Older Will Be Eligible to Receive COVID-19 Vaccine". March 29, 2021.
  74. ^ Otterman, Sharon (August 16, 2021). "All health care workers in New York must get vaccinated, the governor says". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 16, 2021.
  75. ^ "Herd immunity and COVID-19 (coronavirus): What you need to know". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  76. ^ "COVID-19 Vaccine Tracker". COVID-19 Vaccine. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  77. ^ Calgary, Open. "Annual Population Estimates for New York State and Counties: Beginning 1970 | State of New York". data.ny.gov. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  78. ^ "COVID-19 vaccination first phase priority groups". GOV.UK. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  79. ^ "Greenbook Chapter 14A" (PDF). Assets Servicing UK Government. p. 9.
  80. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces New Yorkers with Comorbidities and Underlying Conditions Can Make Appointments at State-Run Mass Vaccination Sites Beginning February 14". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. February 8, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  81. ^ "Video, Audio, Photos & Rush Transcript: Governor Cuomo & Biden Administration Announce Mass Vaccination Sites to Open in New York State, Targeted at Increasing Equitable Vaccination Access". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. February 10, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  82. ^ "Governor Cuomo & Biden Administration Announce Mass Vaccination Sites to Open in New York State, Targeted at Increasing Equitable Vaccination Access". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. February 10, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  83. ^ "Problems still persist for those seeking appointments on NYS coronavirus vaccine website". News 4 Buffalo. January 15, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  84. ^ "New York State responds to concerns about making COVID-19 vaccine appointments online". WKBW. February 14, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  85. ^ Singh-Kurtz, Sangeeta (April 2, 2021). "Catching Up With NYC's "Vaccine Daddy"". The Cut. New York (magazine).
  86. ^ "TurboVax". www.turbovax.info. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  87. ^ Gartland, Michael. "Mayoral candidate Andrew Yang praises TurboVax creator for helping New Yorkers find vaccine appointments". nydailynews.com. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  88. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces Pilot Program to Begin Administering Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine at State-Run Mass Vaccination Sites". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. March 2, 2021. Retrieved March 4, 2021.
  89. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces New Yorkers 60 Years of Age and Older and Additional Public Facing Essential Workers Will Be Eligible to Receive COVID-19 Vaccine". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. March 9, 2021. Retrieved March 11, 2021.
  90. ^ "Understanding Vaccination Progress". Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  91. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces New Yorkers 50 Years of Age and Older Will Be Eligible to Receive COVID-19 Vaccine". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. March 22, 2021. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  92. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces New Yorkers 30 Years of Age and Older Will Be Eligible to Receive COVID-19 Vaccine". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. March 29, 2021. Retrieved April 8, 2021.
  93. ^ "Governor Cuomo Accepts NYS Clinical Advisory Task Force Recommendation to Immediately Implement Expanded Use Authorization of the Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine for 12 to 15-Year-Olds". www.governor.ny.gov. Retrieved May 27, 2021.
  94. ^ "Skoufis to Introduce Bill to Move April Presidential Primary to June". NY State Senate. March 13, 2020. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  95. ^ Vielkind, Jimmy (March 22, 2020). "Coronavirus May Postpone New York's Presidential Primary". The Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  96. ^ Saul, Stephanie (March 28, 2020). "Cuomo Postpones New York's Primary Election to June 23 Because of Coronavirus". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  97. ^ "NY commissioners: Delay April presidential primary". Newsday. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  98. ^ "New York Nixes Democratic Presidential Primary Due to Virus". NBC New York. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  99. ^ Spector, Joseph. "Voters in New York can vote by absentee ballot for June 23 primaries". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  100. ^ "New York Nixes Democratic Presidential Primary Due to Virus". NBC New York. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  101. ^ "New York Cancels Presidential Primary Election, Angering Sanders Supporters". NPR.org. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  102. ^ "State Board of Elections Cancels New York Presidential Primary". www.ny1.com. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  103. ^ Saul, Stephanie; Corasaniti, Nick (April 27, 2020). "New York Board of Elections Cancels Democratic Presidential Primary". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  104. ^ Vielkind, Jimmy (April 27, 2020). "Sanders Camp Argues Against Canceling New York Presidential Primary". The Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  105. ^ Saul, Stephanie; Corasaniti, Nick (April 27, 2020). "New York Board of Elections Cancels Democratic Presidential Primary". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  106. ^ "Judge Weighs Constitutionality of NY Primary Shutdown". The New York Times. The Associated Press. May 4, 2020. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  107. ^ Sullivan, Sean (April 27, 2020). "New York state cancels its primary, angering Sanders camp". Washington Post.
  108. ^ Burns, Katelyn (May 6, 2020). "The New York state presidential primary is back on after a federal court ruling". Vox. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  109. ^ Stevens, Matt; Corasaniti, Nick (May 5, 2020). "New York Must Hold Democratic Presidential Primary, Judge Rules". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  110. ^ Sullivan, Sean (May 5, 2020). "Federal judge orders officials to restore New York primary, drawing cheers from Sanders camp". Washington Post.
  111. ^ Stark, Liz. "Appeals court rules New York Democratic presidential primary will take place as planned in June". CNN. Retrieved May 22, 2020.
  112. ^ "Appeals Court OKs June 23 NY Democratic Presidential Primary". The New York Times. The Associated Press. May 19, 2020. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 22, 2020.
  113. ^ "Attorney General James Calls for Automatic Absentee Voting in NY Presidential Primary". ag.ny.gov. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  114. ^ "NY looks to expand absentee voting amid coronavirus pandemic". Times Union. March 22, 2020. Retrieved May 18, 2020.
  115. ^ a b c "Home Page - New York State Board of Elections". www.elections.ny.gov. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  116. ^ Smith, Rachel Holliday (May 14, 2020). "What You Need to Know to Vote in New York's June Primary". The City. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  117. ^ "Home Page - New York State Board of Elections". www.elections.ny.gov. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  118. ^ "NYC nurses fear many coronavirus patients can't afford to self-quarantine". Daily News. March 24, 2020. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  119. ^ "Jewish coronavirus updates: Steep toll for Swedish Jews, a mikvah reverses course and more". Jewish Exponent. April 6, 2020. Archived from the original on April 24, 2020. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  120. ^ Ziri, Danielle (March 25, 2020). "In America's Only Orthodox Town, Coronavirus Poses Unique Challenge for Insular Jewish Community". Haaretz. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  121. ^ "COVID-19/Coronavirus". Orange County Department of Health. March 27, 2020. Archived from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2020.
  122. ^ a b Feldman, Ari (March 24, 2020). "This doctor was already treating patients with Trump's 'gift from God' drug – before FDA approval". The Forward. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  123. ^ "Orange County NY COVID-19 Cases by Town". Orange County. April 4, 2020. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  124. ^ Ettlinger, Rachel (April 5, 2020). "Orange County leaders request containment order for Palm Tree". Times Herald-Record. Middletown, New York. Archived from the original on April 6, 2020. Retrieved April 6, 2020.
  125. ^ "'Heshy' Tischler Charged with Inciting Riot at Lockdown Protests".
  126. ^ DeStefano, Anthony M. (March 2, 2020). "Data: NYC serious crimes spikes in first 2 months of 2020". Newsday. Archived from the original on March 3, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  127. ^ Chapman, Ben (March 23, 2020). "New York City Crime Falls as Coronavirus Takes Hold". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on March 26, 2020. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  128. ^ "Coronavirus Hits Governor Cuomo's Family: Live Updates". The New York Times. March 31, 2020. Archived from the original on April 3, 2020. Retrieved March 31, 2020.
  129. ^ McCarthy, Craig (April 2, 2020). "Major crimes up 12 percent in NYC despite COVID-19 outbreak". Nypost.com. Archived from the original on April 6, 2020. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  130. ^ Spezzamonte, Irene (April 8, 2020). "Coronavirus: 132 new NYPD members test positive for COVID-19, 13th death in the department reported". Staten Island Advance. Archived from the original on April 11, 2020. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  131. ^ Silvarole, Georgie (April 7, 2020). "Crime rates in New York plummet as coronavirus keeps everyone home". Gannett New York. Archived from the original on April 7, 2020. Retrieved April 7, 2020 – via Times Herald-Record.
  132. ^ a b Gabbatt, Adam (April 2, 2020). "New Yorkers fleeing city face fear and hostility from upstate neighbors". The Guardian. Archived from the original on April 2, 2020. Retrieved April 3, 2020.
  133. ^ Linger, Patrick S. (March 20, 2020). "A Message to Our Visitors, Weekenders and Second Homeowners" (Press release). Catskill, New York: Greene County. Archived from the original on April 5, 2020. Retrieved April 4, 2020.
  134. ^ a b "Governor Cuomo Announces Moratorium on COVID-Related Residential Evictions Will Be Extended Until January 1, 2021". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. September 28, 2020. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  135. ^ a b c ""Tenant Safe Harbor Act" Sponsored By Senator Brad Hoylman Signed Into Law". NY State Senate. June 30, 2020. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  136. ^ a b "Governor Cuomo Signs the COVID-19 Emergency Eviction and Foreclosure Prevention Act of 2020". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. December 28, 2020. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  137. ^ a b "The COVID-19 Emergency Eviction and Foreclosure Prevention Act of 2020". NY State Senate. January 4, 2021. Retrieved January 28, 2021.
  138. ^ Feinsand, Mark (March 16, 2020). "Opening of regular season to be pushed back". MLB.com. Archived from the original on March 17, 2020. Retrieved March 16, 2020.
  139. ^ "Silver: NBA hiatus likely to last 'at least' 30 days". ESPN.com. March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  140. ^ NHL statement on coronavirus Archived March 14, 2020, at the Wayback Machine NHL, March 12, 2020
  141. ^ MLS postponed for 30 days; USMNT, USWNT friendlies canceled Archived March 15, 2020, at the Wayback Machine ESPN, March 12, 2020
  142. ^ "NLL Statement on Game Play (March 12, 2020) | National Lacrosse League". March 12, 2020. Archived from the original on March 22, 2020. Retrieved March 15, 2020.
  143. ^ "Coronavirus live updates: NBA suspends season after Utah Jazz player tests positive for COVID-19". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 11, 2020.
  144. ^ NCAA cancels remaining winter and spring championships Archived March 12, 2020, at the Wayback Machine NCAA, March 12, 2020
  145. ^ NJCAA cancels spring sports, basketball nationals amid coronavirus outbreak Archived March 18, 2020, at the Wayback Machine MLive.com, March 16, 2020
  146. ^ Weidner, Nolan (March 12, 2020). "State suspends all high school winter sports playoffs". The Post-Standard. Syracuse, New York. Archived from the original on March 29, 2020. Retrieved March 28, 2020.
  147. ^ Medina, Jeff Zillgitt and Mark. "Kevin Durant among four Brooklyn Nets who test positive for COVID-19". USA Today. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  148. ^ Kramer, Lindsay (April 21, 2020). "First 2 sections in New York state cancel high school spring sports seasons". The Post-Standard. Syracuse, New York. Retrieved April 22, 2020.
  149. ^ Interdonato, Sal (April 27, 2020). "Spring sports still on hold, state championships canceled". Times Herald-Record. Archived from the original on April 28, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  150. ^ Kramer, Lindsay (May 1, 2020). "High school spring sports in NY are done after Cuomo ends school year". The Post-Standard. Syracuse, New York. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  151. ^ Doubek, James (May 16, 2020). "New York Will Allow Horse And Auto Racing To Restart Without Fans June 1". National Public Radio. Retrieved May 20, 2020.
  152. ^ Bove, Matt (July 8, 2020). "Watkins Glen NASCAR race canceled due to COVID-19 travel restrictions". Buffalo, NY: WKBW-TV. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  153. ^ "Governor Cuomo Announces Yankees and Mets Will Hold Spring Training in New York This Year". Governor Andrew M. Cuomo. June 20, 2020. Retrieved June 20, 2020.
  154. ^ Odum, Charles; Blum, Ronald (July 24, 2020). "Braves vs. Mets - Game Recap - July 24, 2020 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Associated Press. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  155. ^ Dodd, Rustin (August 1, 2020). "A home opener at Yankee Stadium without fans? 'That was missing a little bit'". The Athletic. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  156. ^ Seiner, Jake (July 31, 2020). "Red Sox vs. Yankees - Game Recap - July 31, 2020 - ESPN". ESPN.com. Associated Press. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  157. ^ Futterman, Matthew (August 31, 2020). "The Bizarro 2020 U.S. Open Begins". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  158. ^ Randall, Mike (March 31, 2020). "No fanfare for Trout Town's fishing opener". Times Herald-Record. Archived from the original on April 1, 2020. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  159. ^ Figura, David (April 1, 2020). "Coronavirus: Many anglers still getting out for trout fishing season opener". Syracuse Post-Standard. Archived from the original on April 6, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  160. ^ "DEC Announces New York is Open for Hunting, Spring Turkey Season Starts May 1" (Press release). Albany, New York: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. April 7, 2020. Retrieved April 19, 2020.
  161. ^ Hernandez, Sunny (May 11, 2020). "Upstate NY theme parks, water parks, amusement parks: When do they hope to open this summer?". Syracuse.com. Retrieved June 7, 2020.
  162. ^ Propper, David (April 7, 2020). "Rockland to close all county parks over coronavirus fears". The Journal News. Retrieved April 8, 2020 – via Times Herald Record.
  163. ^ Yakin, Heather (April 7, 2020). "Sullivan County closes parks over coronavirus fears". Times Herald-Record. Archived from the original on April 10, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020.
  164. ^ Liberman, Steve (April 15, 2020). "State agrees to close Rockland Lake, Nyack Beach parks". The Journal News. Archived from the original on April 19, 2020. Retrieved April 16, 2020 – via Times Herald-Record.
  165. ^ "New York golf courses ordered to close". WWNY-TV. Carthage, New York. April 9, 2020. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  166. ^ Campbell, Jon (April 18, 2020). "Golfers will be allowed to play New York courses after all". Times Herald-Record. Archived from the original on April 20, 2020. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  167. ^ Spector, Joseph (May 8, 2020). "Golfing in New York: Carts will be allowed by the state under this condition". Times-Herald Record. Retrieved May 9, 2020.
  168. ^ "Harriman State Park". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. April 24, 2020. Archived from the original on April 10, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  169. ^ "Minnewaska State Park Preserve". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. April 24, 2020. Archived from the original on May 1, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  170. ^ "Hudson Highlands State Park Preserve". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. April 24, 2020. Archived from the original on April 6, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  171. ^ "DEC Announces Temporary Closure of Kaaterskill Falls" (Press release). Albany, New York: New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. April 24, 2020. Archived from the original on May 1, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  172. ^ "Catskills Visitor Center". Catskill Interpretive Center. April 24, 2020. Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  173. ^ "Camping Suspensions on State Lands". New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Archived from the original on April 25, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  174. ^ "DEP Postpones Opening of Recreational Boating Season on Four Reservoirs in the Catskills" (Press release). New York: New York City Department of Environmental Protection. April 17, 2020. Archived from the original on April 27, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  175. ^ del Valle, Lauren; Cole, Devan (August 25, 2021). "New York state adjusts Covid death toll, adding nearly 12,000". CNN. Retrieved August 25, 2021.
  176. ^ "Annual Population Estimates for New York State and Counties: Beginning 1970". data.by.gov. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  177. ^ "COVID-19 Dashboard Albany County, NY". legacy.livestories.com. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  178. ^ "Broome County COVID-19 Dashboard". broomecounty.maps.arcgis.com. Broome County Health Department. April 21, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  179. ^ "Cattaraugus County COVID-19 Case Tracker". maps2.cattco.org. Retrieved April 9, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  180. ^ "COVID-19 Chautauqua County, New York". chautauquacounty.maps.arcgis.com. Chautauqua County Department of Health. April 24, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  181. ^ a b c "Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak news". Thedailystar.com. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  182. ^ "Coronavirus (COVID-19)". Columbia County Department of Health. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  183. ^ "Cortland County COVID-19 Update". www.cortland-co.org. Retrieved April 22, 2020.
  184. ^ "COVID-19 | Delaware County Public Health". delawarecountypublichealth.com. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  185. ^ "Dutchess County COVID-19 Community Impact Dashboard". dcny.maps.arcgis.com. April 23, 2020.
  186. ^ "COVID-19 Erie County, New York". erieny.maps.arcgis.com. Erie County Department of Health. April 22, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  187. ^ a b "Genesee and Orleans County Health Department COVID-19 Status". www.co.genesee.ny.us. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  188. ^ "COVID-19 Cases within Livingston County, NY". livingstoncounty.maps.arcgis.com. Livingston County Department of Health. Retrieved April 22, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  189. ^ "COVID-19 Daily Dashboard". www.madisoncounty.ny.gov. Madison County Department of Health. April 24, 2020.
  190. ^ "Monroe County, NY – COVID-19 Dashboard". mappingmonroe.maps.arcgis.com. April 24, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  191. ^ "Nassau County, NY COVID-19 Cases". nassau-county.maps.arcgis.com. Nassau County Dept. of Information Technology. April 11, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  192. ^ "Niagara County COVID-19 Positive Results Map". niagara-county.maps.arcgis.com. Niagara County Department of Health. April 23, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  193. ^ "Oneida County COVID-19 Dashboard". hoccpp.maps.arcgis.com. April 24, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  194. ^ "Onondaga County, NY COVID-19 Cases by Municipality". socpa.maps.arcgis.com. April 22, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  195. ^ "Orange County NY COVID-19 Cases by Town". ocnygis.maps.arcgis.com. Orange County Health Department. April 22, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  196. ^ "Oswego County COVID-19 Dashboard". April 24, 2020.
  197. ^ "Covid-19 Response". Putnam County Online. April 22, 2020.
  198. ^ "Rensselaer County". www.facebook.com. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  199. ^ "Rockland County Coronavirus COVID-19 Dashboard". rockland.maps.arcgis.com. Rockland County Department of Health. April 23, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  200. ^ "Saratoga County COVID-19 Data Dashboard". scphs.maps.arcgis.com. Saratoga County Department of Public Health Services. Retrieved May 21, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  201. ^ "6.27.2020 Schenectady County COVID-19 Community Update". www.schenectadycounty.com. June 27, 2020.
  202. ^ "Coronavirus COVID-19 Steuben County, NY". scnygis.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved April 23, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  203. ^ "Suffolk County, NY: COVID-19 Cases". gis.suffolkcountyny.gov. Suffolk County Department of Information Technology. April 23, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  204. ^ "Facts About the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) | Sullivan County NY". sullivanny.us. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  205. ^ "Tompkins County COVID-19 Data". tompkinscountyny.gov. Tompkins County Health Department. April 23, 2020.
  206. ^ "Ulster County COVID-19 Information". ulstercounty.maps.arcgis.com. April 23, 2020 – via ArcGIS Dashboards.
  207. ^ "Important Information on the COVID-19 Virus". Wayne County Public Health Department. April 23, 2020.
  208. ^ "May 1: County Executive George Latimer Gives Covid-19 Update". Official Westchester Gov Videos.
  209. ^ "Yates County COVID-19 Dashboard". Retrieved May 29, 2020.
  210. ^ "New York State Department of Health COVID-19 Tracker". New York State Department of Health. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  211. ^ a b "New York State Department of Health COVID-19 Tracker". New York State Department of Health. Archived from the original on April 29, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  212. ^ "Annual Population Estimates for New York State and Counties: Beginning 1970". data.by.gov. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  213. ^ a b "County Explorer". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 2, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  214. ^ Spector, Joseph (April 6, 2020). "Coronavirus: New York releases county and age data on deaths. What it shows". Gannett New York. Archived from the original on April 7, 2020. Retrieved April 7, 2020 – via Times Herald-Record.
  215. ^ Spector, Joseph (April 8, 2020). "Coronavirus deaths in New York: 61% were men, and most had these underlying illnesses". The Journal News. Archived from the original on April 8, 2020. Retrieved April 8, 2020 – via Times Herald-Record.
  216. ^ Robinson, David (April 8, 2020). "Coronavirus in NY: COVID-19 race, ethnicity data show black, Hispanic population at higher risk". Gannett New York. Retrieved April 9, 2020 – via Times Herald-Record.
  217. ^ "Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the U.S." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. April 24, 2020. Archived from the original on March 2, 2020. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  218. ^ "Changes in US Data following new CDC guidelines on "Case" and "Death" definition (April 14, 2020) – Worldometer". www.worldometers.info. Archived from the original on April 21, 2020. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  219. ^ "CSSEGISandData/COVID-19: Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases, provided by JHU CSSE". GitHub. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  220. ^ "Nursing Home and ACF COVID Related Deaths Statewide" (PDF). NYSDOH. Retrieved June 30, 2020.

External links