United States congressional delegations from Indiana

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Indiana's congressional districts since 2013[1]

These are tables of congressional delegations from Indiana to the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Since its statehood in 1816, the U.S. state of Indiana has sent congressional delegations to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. Each state elects two senators statewide to serve for six years, and their elections are staggered to be held in two of every three even-numbered years—Indiana's Senate election years are to Classes I and III. Before the Seventeenth Amendment in 1913, Senators were elected by the Indiana General Assembly. Members of the House of Representatives are elected to two-year terms, one from each of Indiana's nine congressional districts. Before becoming a state, the Indiana Territory elected delegates at-large and sent three to Congress, but the territorial delegates were restricted from voting on legislation.

The longest-serving of any of Indiana's Congressmen is Senator Richard Lugar, serving from 1977 to 2013. The longest-serving House member is Lee H. Hamilton, who served from 1965 to 1999. There have been 346 people who have represented Indiana in Congress: 320 in the House, 27 in the Senate, and 18 in both houses, with an average term of seven years. Indiana has elected seven women[2] and three African Americans[3] to Congress.

The current dean of the Indiana delegation is Representative André Carson (IN-7), having served in Congress since 2008.

U.S. House of Representatives

Current members

List of members of the House delegation, their terms in office, district boundaries, and the district political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 8 members, including 6 Republicans, 2 Democrats, and 1 vacancy.

District Incumbent District
Member
(Residence)
Party Tenure CPVI Map
1st Frank Mrvan 117th U.S Congress (cropped).jpg
Frank J. Mrvan
(Highland)
Democratic since
January 3, 2021
D+4 Indiana US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Vacant since
August 3, 2022
R+13 Indiana US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Jim Banks official portrait (cropped).jpg
Jim Banks
(Columbia City)
Republican since
January 3, 2017
R+19 Indiana US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th Rep. Jim Baird official photo, 116th congress (cropped).jpg
Jim Baird
(Greencastle)
Republican since
January 3, 2019
R+18 Indiana US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
5th Victoria Spartz 117th U.S Congress (cropped).jpg
Victoria Spartz
(Noblesville)
Republican since
January 3, 2021
R+5 Indiana US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif
6th Greg Pence, official portrait, 116th Congress (cropped).jpg
Greg Pence
(Columbus)
Republican since
January 3, 2019
R+22 Indiana US Congressional District 6 (since 2013).tif
7th Andre Carson 2009 (cropped).jpg
André Carson
(Indianapolis)
Democratic since
March 11, 2008
D+11 Indiana US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif
8th Larry Bucshon official congressional photo (cropped).jpg
Larry Bucshon
(Newburgh)
Republican since
January 3, 2011
R+19 Indiana US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
9th Representative Trey Hollingsworth (cropped).jpg
Trey Hollingsworth
(Jeffersonville)
Republican since
January 3, 2017
R+15 Indiana US Congressional District 9 (since 2013).tif

Members of the House of Representatives are elected every two years by popular vote within a congressional district. Indiana has nine congressional districts—this number is reapportioned based on the state's population, determined every ten years by a census. Indiana had a maximum representation of 13 congressmen from 1873 to 1933. Since 2003 Indiana has had nine representatives, which was reduced from ten after the 2000 census. This gives Indiana the fourteenth-largest delegation; during the period from 1853 to 1873 the state had the fifth-largest delegation.

Historical timeline

Indiana has been represented by 322 people in the House, including 1 who was previously a territorial delegate.

   Anti-Monopoly (A-M)    Democratic (D)    Democratic-Republican (DR)    Free Soil (FS)    Greenback (GB)
   Independent (I)    National Republican    National Union (NU)    Opposition (O)    Republican (R)    Whig (W)

1815–1823: 1 at-large seat

Congress At-large
14th (1815–1817) William Hendricks (DR)
15th (1817–1819)
16th (1819–1821)
17th (1821–1823)
Jonathan Jennings (DR)

1823–1833: 3 seats

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district
18th (1823–1825) William Prince (DR)[a] Jonathan Jennings (DR) John Test (DR)
Jacob Call (DR)[b]
19th (1825–1827) Ratliff Boon (J) Jonathan Jennings (NR) John Test (NR)
20th (1827–1829) Thomas H. Blake (NR) Oliver H. Smith (I)
21st (1829–1831) Ratliff Boon (J) John Test (NR)
22nd (1831–1833) John Carr (J) Johnathan McCarty (J)

1833–1843: 7 seats

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district 5th district 6th district 7th district
23rd (1833–1835) Ratliff Boon (J) John Ewing (NR) John Carr (J) Amos Lane (J) Johnathan McCarty (J) George L. Kinnard (J) Ned Hannegan (J)
24th (1835–1837) John Wesley Davis (J) Johnathan McCarty (NR)
25th (1837–1839) Ratliff Boon (D) John Ewing (W) William Graham (W) George H. Dunn (W) James Rariden (W) William Herod (W) Albert Smith White (W)
26th (1839–1841) George H. Proffit (W) John Wesley Davis (D) John Carr (D) Thomas Smith (D) William W. Wick (D) Tilghman Howard (D)
27th (1841–1843) Richard W. Thompson (W) Joseph L. White (W) James H. Cravens (W) Andrew Kennedy (D) David Wallace (W) Henry Smith Lane (W)

1843–1853:10 seats

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district 5th district 6th district 7th district 8th district 9th district 10th district
28th
(1843–1845)
Robert D.
Owen
(D)
Thomas J.
Henley
(D)
Thomas
Smith
(D)
Caleb Blood
Smith
(W)
William J.
Brown
(D)
John Wesley
Davis
(D)
Joseph A.
Wright
(D)
John
Pettit
(D)
Samuel C.
Sample
(W)
Andrew
Kennedy
(D)
29th
(1845–1847)
William W.
Wick
(D)
Edward W.
McGaughey
(W)
Charles W.
Cathcart
(D)
30th
(1847–1849)
Elisha
Embree
(W)
John L.
Robinson
(D)
George Grundy
Dunn
(W)
Richard W.
Thompson
(W)
William R.
Rockhill
(D)
31st
(1849–1851)
Nathaniel
Albertson
(D)
Cyrus L.
Dunham
(D)
George
Julian
(FS)
William J.
Brown
(D)
Willis A.
Gorman
(D)
Edward W.
McGaughey
(W)
Joseph E.
McDonald
(D)
Graham N.
Fitch
(D)
Andrew J.
Harlan
(D)
32nd
(1851–1853)
James
Lockhart
(D)
Samuel W.
Parker
(W)
Thomas A.
Hendricks
(D)
John G.
Davis
(D)
Daniel
Mace
(D)
Samuel
Brenton
(W)

1853–1875: 11, then 13 seats

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district 5th district 6th district 7th district 8th district 9th district 10th district 11th district At-large seats
33rd
(1853–1855)
Smith
Miller
(D)
William
English
(D)
Cyrus L.
Dunham
(D)
James Henry
Lane
(D)
Samuel W.
Parker
(W)
Thomas A.
Hendricks
(D)
John G.
Davis
(D)
Daniel
Mace
(D)
Norman
Eddy
(D)
E. M.
Chamberlain
(D)
Andrew J.
Harlan
(D)
34th
(1855–1857)
George Grundy
Dunn
(O)
William
Cumback
(O)
David P.
Holloway
(O)
Lucien
Barbour
(O)
Harvey D.
Scott
(R)
Daniel
Mace
(R)
Schuyler
Colfax
(R)
Samuel
Brenton
(O)
John U.
Pettit
(R)
35th
(1857–1859)
James
Lockhart
(D)
James
Hughes
(D)
James B.
Foley
(D)
David
Kilgore
(R)
James M.
Gregg
(D)
John G.
Davis
(D)[c]
James
Wilson
(R)
Samuel
Brenton
(R)
William E.
Niblack
(D)
Charles
Case
(R)
36th
(1859–1861)
William
McKee
Dunn
(R)
William S.
Holman
(D)
Albert G.
Porter
(R)
37th
(1861–1863)
John
Law
(D)
James A.
Cravens
(D)
George
Julian
(R)
Daniel W.
Voorhees
(D)
Albert Smith
White
(R)
William
Mitchell
(R)
John P. C.
Shanks
(R)
38th
(1863–1865)
Henry W.
Harrington
(D)
Ebenezer
Dumont
(R)
Godlove S.
Orth
(R)
Joseph K.
Edgerton
(D)
James F.
McDowell
(D)
39th
(1865–1867)
William E.
Niblack
(D)
Michael C.
Kerr
(D)
Ralph
Hill
(R)
John Hanson
Farquhar
(R)
Joseph H.
Defrees
(R)
Thomas N.
Stilwell
(R)
Henry D.
Washburn
(R)
40th
(1867–1869)
Morton C.
Hunter
(R)
William S.
Holman
(D)
John
Coburn
(R)
William
Williams
(R)
John P. C.
Shanks
(R)
41st
(1869–1871)
William S.
Holman
(D)
George
Julian
(R)
John
Coburn
(R)
Daniel W.
Voorhees
(D)
Godlove S.
Orth
(R)
James
Tyner
(R)
John P. C.
Shanks
(R)
Jasper
Packard
(R)
42nd
(1871–1873)
Jeremiah M.
Wilson
(R)
Mahlon D.
Manson
(D)
43rd
(1873–1875)
Simeon K.
Wolfe
(D)
Morton C.
Hunter
(R)
Thomas J.
Cason
(R)
Henry B.
Sayler
(R)
Godlove S.
Orth
(R)
William
Williams
(R)

1875–1933: 13 seats

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district 5th district 6th district 7th district 8th district 9th district 10th district 11th district 12th district 13th district
44th
(1875–1877)
Benoni S.
Fuller
(D)
James D.
Williams
(D)[d]
Michael C.
Kerr
(D)[a]
Jeptha D.
New
(D)
William S.
Holman
(D)
Milton S.
Robinson
(R)
Franklin
Landers
(D)
Morton C.
Hunter
(R)
Thomas J.
Cason
(R)
William S.
Haymond
(D)
James
La Fayette
Evans
(R)
Andrew H.
Hamilton
(D)
John
Baker
(R)
Andrew
Humphreys
(D)[e]
Nathan T.
Carr
(D)[f]
45th
(1877–1879)
Thomas R.
Cobb
(D)
George A.
Bicknell
(D)
Leonidas
Sexton
(R)
Thomas M.
Browne
(R)
John
Hanna
(R)
Michael D.
White
(R)
William H.
Calkins
(R)
46th
(1879–1881)
William
Heilman
(R)
Jeptha D.
New
(D)
William R.
Myers
(D)
Gilbert De La
Matyr
(GB)
Abraham J.
Hostetler
(D)
Godlove
Stein
Orth
(R)
Calvin
Cowgill
(R)
Walpole G.
Colerick
(D)
47th
(1881–1883)
Strother M.
Stockslager

(D)
William S.
Holman
(D)
Courtland C.
Matson
(D)
Thomas M.
Browne
(R)
Stanton J.
Peelle
(R)
Robert B. F.
Peirce
(R)
Mark L.
De Motte
(R)
George W.
Steele
(R)
William H.
Calkins
(R)
Charles T.
Doxey
(R)
48th
(1883–1885)
John J.
Kleiner
(D)
John Edward
Lamb
(D)
Thomas B.
Ward
(D)
Thomas J.
Wood
(D)
Robert
Lowry
(D)
William E.
English
(D)
Benjamin F.
Shively
(A-M)
49th
(1885–1887)
Jonas G.
Howard
(D)
William D.
Bynum
(D)
James T.
Johnston
(R)
William D.
Owen
(R)
George
Ford
(D)
50th
(1887–1889)
Alvin Hovey (R)[a] John H.
O'Neall
(D)
Joseph B.
Cheadle
(R)
James Bain
White
(R)
Benjamin F.
Shively
(D)
F. B. Posey (R)[g]
51st
(1889–1891)
William F.
Parrett
(D)
Jason B.
Brown
(D)
George W.
Cooper
(D)
Elijah V.
Brookshire

(D)
Augustus N.
Martin
(D)
Charles A. O.
McClellan
(D)
52nd
(1891–1893)
John L.
Bretz
(D)
Henry U.
Johnson
(R)
Daniel W.
Waugh
(R)
David H.
Patton
(D)
53rd
(1893–1895)
Arthur H.
Taylor
(D)
Thomas
Hammond
(D)
William F.
McNagny
(D)
Charles G.
Conn
(D)
54th
(1895–1897)
James A.
Hemenway
(R)
Alexander M.
Hardy
(R)
Robert J.
Tracewell
(R)
James Eli
Watson
(R)
Jesse
Overstreet
(R)
Charles L.
Henry
(R)
George W.
Faris
(R)
Frank
Hanly
(R)
Jethro A.
Hatch
(R)
George W.
Steele
(R)
Jacob D.
Leighty
(R)
Lemuel W.
Royse
(R)
55th
(1897–1899)
Robert W.
Miers
(D)
William T.
Zenor
(D)
William S.
Holman
(D)
George W.
Faris
(R)
Jesse
Overstreet

(R)
Charles L.
Henry
(R)
Charles B.
Landis
(R)
Edgar D.
Crumpacker

(R)
James M.
Robinson
(D)
Francis M.
Griffith
(D)
56th
(1899–1901)
James Eli
Watson
(R)
George W.
Cromer
(R)
Abraham L.
Brick
(R)
57th
(1901–1903)
Elias S.
Holliday
(R)
58th
(1903–1905)
Frederick
Landis
(R)
59th
(1905–1907)
John H.
Foster
(R)
John C.
Chaney
(R)
Lincoln
Dixon
(D)
Newton W.
Gilbert
(R)
60th
(1907–1909)
William E.
Cox
(D)
John A. M.
Adair
(D)
George W.
Rauch
(D)
Clarence C.
Gilhams
(R)
61st
(1909–1911)
John W.
Boehne
(D)
William A.
Cullop
(D)
Ralph W.
Moss
(D)
William O.
Barnard
(R)
Charles A.
Korbly
(D)
Martin A.
Morrison
(D)
Cyrus
Cline
(D)
Henry A.
Barnhart
(D)
62nd
(1911–1913)
Finly H.
Gray
(D)
63rd
(1913–1915)
Charles
Lieb
(D)
John B.
Peterson
(D)
64th
(1915–1917)
Merrill
Moores
(R)
William R.
Wood
(R)
65th
(1917–1919)
George K.
Denton
(D)
Oscar E.
Bland
(R)
Everett
Sanders
(R)
Daniel W.
Comstock
(R)
Albert H.
Vestal
(R)
Fred S.
Purnell
(R)
Milton
Kraus
(R)
Louis W.
Fairfield
(R)
Richard N.
Elliott
(R)
66th
(1919–1921)
Oscar R.
Luhring
(R)
James W.
Dunbar
(R)
John S.
Benham
(R)
Andrew J.
Hickey
(R)
67th
(1921–1923)
68th
(1923–1925)
William E.
Wilson
(D)
Arthur H.
Greenwood
(D)
Frank
Gardner
(D)
Harry C.
Canfield
(D)
Samuel E.
Cook
(D)
69th
(1925–1927)
Harry E.
Rowbottom
(R)
Noble J.
Johnson
(R)
Ralph E.
Updike
(R)
Albert R.
Hall
(R)
David
Hogg

(R)
70th
(1927–1929)
71st
(1929–1931)
James W.
Dunbar
(R)
Louis
Ludlow
(D)
72nd
(1931–1933)
John W.
Boehne Jr.
(D)
Eugene B.
Crowe
(D)
Courtland C.
Gillen
(D)
William
Larrabee
(D)
Glenn
Griswold
(D)
Samuel B.
Pettengill
(D)

1933–1983: 12, then 11 seats

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district 5th district 6th district 7th district 8th district 9th district 10th district 11th district 12th district
73rd (1933–1935) William T.
Schulte
(D)
George R.
Durgan
(D)
Samuel B.
Pettengill

(D)
James
Indus
Farley
(D)
Glenn
Griswold
(D)
Virginia E.
Jenckes
(D)
Arthur H.
Greenwood

(D)
John W.
Boehne
Jr.
(D)
Eugene B.
Crowe
(D)
Finly H.
Gray
(D)
William
Larrabee

(D)
Louis
Ludlow
(D)
74th (1935–1937) Charles
Halleck
(R)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941) Robert A.
Grant
(R)
George W.
Gillie
(R)
Forest
Harness
(R)
Noble J.
Johnson
(R)
Gerald W.
Landis
(R)
Raymond S.
Springer
(R)
77th (1941–1943) Earl
Wilson
(R)
78th (1943–1945) Ray
Madden
(D)
Charles M.
La Follette
(R)
Louis
Ludlow
(D)
79th (1945–1947)
80th (1947–1949) E. A.
Mitchell
(R)
81st (1949–1951) Thurman C.
Crook
(D)
Edward H.
Kruse
(D)
John R.
Walsh
(D)
Cecil M.
Harden
(R)
James E.
Noland
(D)
Winfield K.
Denton
(D)
Ralph
Harvey
(R)
Andrew
Jacobs
(D)
82nd (1951–1953) Shepard
Crumpacker

(R)
E. Ross
Adair
(R)
John V.
Beamer
(R)
William G.
Bray
(R)
Charles
Brownson

(R)
83rd (1953–1955) D. Bailey
Merrill
(R)
84th (1955–1957) Winfield K.
Denton
(D)
85th (1957–1959) F. Jay
Nimitz
(R)
86th (1959–1961) John
Brademas

(D)
J. Edward
Roush
(D)
Fred
Wampler
(D)
Earl
Hogan
(D)
"Front Porch"
Harmon
(D)
Joseph W.
Barr
(D)
87th (1961–1963) Richard
Roudebush

(R)
Earl
Wilson
(R)
Ralph
Harvey
(R)
Donald C.
Bruce
(R)
88th (1963–1965)
89th (1965–1967) Lee H.
Hamilton

(D)
Andrew
Jacobs
Jr.
(D)
90th (1967–1969) William G.
Bray
(R)
John T.
Myers
(R)
Roger H.
Zion
(R)
Richard
Roudebush
(R)
91st (1969–1971) Earl
Landgrebe

(R)
Richard
Roudebush
(R)
David W.
Dennis
(R)
92nd (1971–1973) J. Edward
Roush
(D)
Elwood
Hillis
(R)
93rd (1973–1975) William
Hudnut
(R)
94th (1975–1977) Floyd
Fithian
(D)
David W.
Evans
(D)
Philip H.
Hayes
(D)
Philip
Sharp
(D)
Andrew
Jacobs
Jr.
(D)
95th (1977–1979) Adam
Benjamin

(D)
Dan
Quayle
(R)
David
Cornwell
(D)
96th (1979–1981) H. Joel
Deckard
(R)
97th (1981–1983) John P.
Hiler
(R)
Dan
Coats
(R)
Katie Hall (D)

1983–2003: 10 seats

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district 5th district 6th district 7th district 8th district 9th district 10th district
98th (1983–1985) Katie Hall (D) Philip
Sharp
(D)
John P.
Hiler
(R)
Dan
Coats
(R)
Elwood
Hills
(R)
Dan
Burton
(R)
John T.
Myers
(R)
Frank
McCloskey

(D)
Lee H.
Hamilton

(D)
Andrew
Jacobs
Jr.
(D)
99th (1985–1987) Pete
Visclosky

(D)
100th (1987–1989) Jim
Jontz
(D)
101st (1989–1991) Jill Long
Thompson

(D)
102nd (1991–1993) Tim
Roemer
(D)
103rd (1993–1995) Steve
Buyer
(R)
104th (1995–1997) David M.
McIntosh
(R)
Mark
Souder
(R)
John
Hostettler

(R)
105th (1997–1999) Edward A.
Pease
(R)
Julia
Carson
(D)
106th (1999–2001) Baron
Hill
(D)
107th (2001–2003) Mike Pence (R) Brian Kerns (R)

2003–present: 9 seats

Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district 5th district 6th district 7th district 8th district 9th district
108th (2003–2005) Pete
Visclosky
(D)
Chris
Chocola
(R)
Mark
Souder
(R)
Steve
Buyer
(R)
Dan Burton (R) Mike
Pence
(R)
Julia
Carson
(D)
John
Hostettler
(R)
Baron Hill (D)
109th (2005–2007) Mike Sodrel (R)
110th (2007–2009) Joe
Donnelly
(D)
Brad
Ellsworth
(D)
Baron Hill (D)
André
Carson
(D)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013) Marlin
Stutzman
(R)
Todd
Rokita
(R)
Larry
Bucshon
(R)
Todd
Young
(R)
113th (2013–2015) Jackie
Walorski
(R)[a]
Susan Brooks (R) Luke
Messer
(R)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019) Jim Banks (R) Trey
Hollingsworth

(R)
116th (2019–2021) Jim Baird (R) Greg
Pence
(R)
117th (2021–2023) Frank Mrvan (D) Victoria Spartz (R)
Vacant
Congress 1st district 2nd district 3rd district 4th district 5th district 6th district 7th district 8th district 9th district

U.S. Senate

Current senators
Todd Young
Senator Todd Young (R)
Mike Braun
Senator Mike Braun (R)

Each state elects two senators by statewide popular vote every six years. The terms of the two senators are staggered so that they are not elected in the same year. Indiana's senators are elected in the years from classes 1 and 3. Senators were originally chosen by the Indiana General Assembly until the Seventeenth Amendment came into force in 1913.[9][10]

Of the forty-six men who have been senators from Indiana, there have been three Democratic-Republicans, three Adams Republicans (including James Noble, who was both a Democratic-Republican and Adams Republican), two Whigs, one Unionist, twenty-one Democrats, and seventeen Republicans.

  Democratic (D)   Democratic-Republican (DR)   Jacksonian (J)   National Republican (NR)   Republican (R)   Unionist (U)   Whig (W)

James Noble, Indiana's first senator
Richard Lugar, the longest-serving senator from Indiana, served from 1977 to 2013
Thomas A. Hendricks, two-term Representative, one-term senator, and President of the Senate (Vice President), as well as Governor of Indiana
Schuyler Colfax, Seven-term Representative and Speaker of the House and later President of the Senate (Vice President)
Dan Quayle, two-term representative, one-term senator, and President of the Senate (Vice President)
Class 1 senators Congress Class 3 senators
James Noble (DR) 14th (1815–1817) Waller Taylor (DR)
15th (1817–1819)
16th (1819–1821)
17th (1821–1823)
18th (1823–1825)
James Noble (NR)[h] 19th (1825–1827) William Hendricks (NR)
20th (1827–1829)
21st (1829–1831)
Robert Hanna (NR)[i] 22nd (1831–1833)
John Tipton (J)[j] 23rd (1833–1835)
24th (1835–1837)
John Tipton (D) 25th (1837–1839) Oliver H. Smith (W)
Albert Smith White (W) 26th (1839–1841)
27th (1841–1843)
28th (1843–1845) Edward A. Hannegan (D)
Jesse D. Bright (D)[k] 29th (1845–1847)
30th (1847–1849)
31st (1849–1851) James Whitcomb (D)[h]
32nd (1851–1853)
Charles W. Cathcart (D)[l]
John Pettit (D)[m]
33rd (1853–1855)
34th (1855–1857) Graham N. Fitch (D)
35th (1857–1859)
36th (1859–1861)
Joseph A. Wright (U)[n] 37th (1861–1863) Henry Smith Lane (R)
David Turpie (D)[o]
Thomas A. Hendricks (D) 38th (1863–1865)
39th (1865–1867)
40th (1867–1869) Oliver P. Morton (R)[h]
Daniel D. Pratt (R) 41st (1869–1871)
42nd (1871–1873)
43rd (1873–1875)
Joseph E. McDonald (D) 44th (1875–1877)
45th (1877–1879)
Daniel W. Voorhees (D)[p]
46th (1879–1881)
Benjamin Harrison (R) 47th (1881–1883)
48th (1883–1885)
49th (1885–1887)
David Turpie (D) 50th (1887–1889)
51st (1889–1891)
52nd (1891–1893)
53rd (1893–1895)
54th (1895–1897)
55th (1897–1899) Charles W. Fairbanks (R)
Albert J. Beveridge (R) 56th (1899–1901)
57th (1901–1903)
58th (1903–1905)
59th (1905–1907) James A. Hemenway (R)
60th (1907–1909)
61st (1909–1911) Benjamin F. Shively (D)[h]
John W. Kern (D) 62nd (1911–1913)
63rd (1913–1915)
64th (1915–1917)
Thomas Taggart (D)[q]
James Eli Watson (R)[r]
Harry Stewart New (R) 65th (1917–1919)
66th (1919–1921)
67th (1921–1923)
Samuel M. Ralston (D)[h] 68th (1923–1925)
69th (1925–1927)
Arthur Raymond
Robinson
(R)[s]
70th (1927–1929)
71st (1929–1931)
72nd (1931–1933)
73rd (1933–1935) Frederick Van Nuys (D)[h]
Sherman Minton (D) 74th (1935–1937)
75th (1937–1939)
76th (1939–1941)
Raymond E. Willis (R) 77th (1941–1943)
78th (1943–1945) Samuel D. Jackson (D)[t]
William E. Jenner (R)[u]
79th (1945–1947) Homer E. Capehart (R)
William E. Jenner (R) 80th (1947–1949)
81st (1949–1951)
82nd (1951–1953)
83rd (1953–1955)
84th (1955–1957)
85th (1957–1959)
Vance Hartke (D) 86th (1959–1961)
87th (1961–1963)
88th (1963–1965) Birch Bayh (D)
89th (1965–1967)
90th (1967–1969)
91st (1969–1971)
92nd (1971–1973)
93rd (1973–1975)
94th (1975–1977)
Richard Lugar (R) 95th (1977–1979)
96th (1979–1981)
97th (1981–1983) Dan Quayle (R)[v]
98th (1983–1985)
99th (1985–1987)
100th (1987–1989)
Dan Coats (R)[w]
101st (1989–1991)
102nd (1991–1993)
103rd (1993–1995)
104th (1995–1997)
105th (1997–1999)
106th (1999–2001) Evan Bayh (D)
107th (2001–2003)
108th (2003–2005)
109th (2005–2007)
110th (2007–2009)
111th (2009–2011)
112th (2011–2013) Dan Coats (R)
Joe Donnelly (D) 113th (2013–2015)
114th (2015–2017)
115th (2017–2019) Todd Young (R)
Mike Braun (R) 116th (2019–2021)
117th (2021–2023)

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Died
  2. ^ Call won the election to fill the vacancy left by Rep. Prince's death. He started to serve on December 24, 1824.[4]
  3. ^ Anti-Lecompton Democrat
  4. ^ Rep. Williams resigned on December 1, 1876 to run for Governor of Indiana.[5]
  5. ^ Humphreys won the election to fill the vacancy left by Rep. Williams's resignation. He started to serve on December 5, 1876.[6]
  6. ^ Carr won the election to fill the vacancy left by Rep. Kerr's death. He started to serve on December 5, 1876.[7]
  7. ^ Posey won the election to fill the vacancy left by Rep. Hovey's death. He started to serve on January 29, 1889.[8]
  8. ^ a b c d e f Died.
  9. ^ Upon the death of senator Noble, Hanna was appointed to serve until an election could be held. He served from August 19, 1831 to January 3, 1832.[11]
  10. ^ Elected to fill senator's Noble term in a special election. He started to serve on December 9, 1831 and was then subsequently elected to a full term.[12]
  11. ^ Expelled from the Senate for supporting the Confederacy.[13]
  12. ^ Upon the death of senator Whitcomb, Catcart was appointed to serve until an election could be held. Cartcart served from December 6, 1852 to January 18, 1853.[14]
  13. ^ Elected to serve the remainder of senator Whitcomb's term. Pettit served from January 18, 1853 to March 3, 1855.[14]
  14. ^ Upon the expulsion of senator Bright, Wright was appointed to fill the vacancy until an election could be held and served from February 24, 1862 to January 14, 1863.[15]
  15. ^ Elected to fill the vacancy caused by the expulsion of senator Bright and served from January 14, 1863 to March 3, 1863.[16]
  16. ^ Upon the death of senator Morton, Voorhees was appointed to fill the vacancy until an election could be held. He was subsequently elected to fill the rest of the term.[17]
  17. ^ Upon the death of senator Shively, Taggert was appointed to fill the vacancy until an election could be held and served from March 20, 1916 to November 7, 1916. He subsequently lost the election for Shively's seat.[18]
  18. ^ Won the election to fill the remainder of senator Shively's term. He started to serve on November 8, 1916.[19]
  19. ^ Upon the death of senator Ralston, Robinson was appointed on October 20, 1925 to serve until an election could be held and subsequently won the election.[20]
  20. ^ Upon the death of senator Van Nuys, Jackson was appointed to fill the vacancy until an election could be held and served from January 28, 1944 to November 13, 1944.[21]
  21. ^ Jenner won the election to fill the vacancy left by senator Jackson's death. He started to serve on November 14, 1944.[22]
  22. ^ Resigned on January 3, 1989 to become the Vice President of the United States.[23]
  23. ^ Upon the resignation of senator Quayle, Coats was appointed on December 12, 1988 to serve until an election could be held and subsequently won the election.[24]

References

  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  2. ^ "Women Representatives and Senators by State and Territory, 1917–Present". Women in Congress. Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Archived from the original on January 16, 2011. Retrieved January 21, 2011.
  3. ^ "Black-American Representatives and Senators by State and Territory, 1870–Present". Black Americans in Congress. Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Archived from the original on January 1, 2009. Retrieved December 28, 2008.
  4. ^ "Call, Jacob". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  5. ^ "Williams, James Douglas". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  6. ^ "Humphreys, Andrew". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  7. ^ "Carr, Nathan Tracy". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  8. ^ "Posey, Francis Blackburn". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  9. ^ U.S. Const. Art. I, § 3
  10. ^ U.S. Const. Amendment XVII
  11. ^ "Hanna, Robert". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  12. ^ "Tipton, John". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate.
  13. ^ "Bright, Jesse David". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  14. ^ a b "Catcart, Charles William". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  15. ^ "Wright, Joseph Albert". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  16. ^ "Turpie, David". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  17. ^ "Voorhees, Daniel Wolsey". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  18. ^ "Taggart, Thomas". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  19. ^ "Watson, James Eli". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  20. ^ "Robinson, Arthur Raymond". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  21. ^ "Jackson, Samuel Dillon". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  22. ^ "Jenner, William Ezra". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  23. ^ "Quayle, James Danforth". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.
  24. ^ "Coats, Daniel Ray". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Clerk of the United States House of Representatives and Historian of the United States Senate. Retrieved January 25, 2011.