United States presidential elections in Arizona

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Presidential elections in Arizona
Map of the United States with Arizona highlighted
Number of elections28
Voted Democratic9
Voted Republican19
Voted other0
Voted for winning candidate22
Voted for losing candidate6

Since Arizona's admission to the Union in February 1912,[1] it has participated in 28 United States presidential elections. In the 1912 presidential election, the incumbent president William Howard Taft finished fourth in Arizona, receiving just 12.75% of the popular vote.[2] In the 1936 presidential election, the Democratic Party's candidate Franklin D. Roosevelt won Arizona, defeating the Republican Party's candidate Alf Landon by 42.92%,[3] which remains the largest margin of victory in the state's history. Ross Perot, the independent candidate in the 1992 presidential election, received the highest vote share (23.79%) ever won by a third-party candidate in Arizona.[4]

Joe Biden, the Democratic Party's candidate in the 2020 presidential election, won Arizona, defeating the incumbent president Donald Trump by a close margin of 0.3%.[5] During the 2021 joint session of the Congress for ascertaining the electoral votes, 69 members objected to the certification of electoral votes of Arizona, asserting that "they were not, under all of the known circumstances, regularly given".[6] The objection failed by a vote of 6–93 in the Senate and 121–303 in the House of Representatives.[7] However, Trump's campaign has launched various post-election lawsuits challenging the results.[8] As of 2022, no Republican has won the presidency without carrying Arizona since its statehood in 1912, but Democrats have won the presidency without carrying the state six times, most recently Barack Obama in 2012.

Since the 1952 presidential election, Arizona has been considered a stronghold state for the Republican Party, as it won Arizona in all elections since except 1996 and 2020.[9] However, recent political realignment has led some to consider Arizona as a swing state, and demographic changes and trends in Maricopa County, Pinal County and Pima County has led others to believe Arizona will slowly solidify into a Democratic stronghold, much like the trends seen in Florida in recent decades. [9][10]

Presidential elections

Key for parties
  Communist Party USA – (CPUSA)
  Constitution Party – (CP)
  Democratic Party – (D)
  Green Party – (G)
  Libertarian Party – (LI)
  Prohibition Party – (PRO)
  Reform Party – (RE)
  Republican Party – (R)
  Union Party – (U)

Note – A double dagger (‡) indicates the national winner.
Note – Percentages may not total 100.0% because of rounding.

Presidential elections in Arizona from 1912 to present
Year Winner Runner-up Other candidate[a] EV Ref.
Candidate Votes % Candidate Votes % Candidate Votes %
Woodrow Wilson (D) 10,324 43.6% Theodore Roosevelt (PR) 6,949 29.3% Eugene Debs (S) 3,163 13.4% 3
Woodrow Wilson (D) 33,170 57.2% Charles Evans Hughes (R) 20,522 35.4% Allan L. Benson (S) 3,174 5.5% 3
Warren G. Harding (R) 37,016 55.4% James M. Cox (D) 29,546 44.2% Eugene Debs (S) 222 0.3% 3
Calvin Coolidge (R) 30,516 41.3% John W. Davis (D) 26,235 35.5% Robert M. La Follette (PR) 17,210 23.3% 3
Herbert Hoover (R) 52,533 57.6% Al Smith (D) 38,537 42.2% William Z. Foster (CPUSA) 184 0.2% 3
Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) 79,264 67.0% Herbert Hoover (R) 36,104 30.5% Norman Thomas (S) 2,618 2.2% 3
Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) 86,722 69.8% Alf Landon (R) 33,433 26.9% William Lemke (U) 3,307 2.7% 3
Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) 95,267 63.5% Wendell Willkie (R) 54,030 36.0% Roger Babson (PRO) 742 0.5% 3
Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) 80,926 58.8% Thomas E. Dewey (R) 56,287 40.9% Claude A. Watson (PRO) 421 0.3% 4
Harry S. Truman (D) 95,251 53.8% Thomas E. Dewey (R) 77,597 43.8% Henry A. Wallace (PR) 3,310 1.9% 4
Dwight D. Eisenhower (R) 152,042 58.3% Adlai Stevenson (D) 108,528 41.7%
4
Dwight D. Eisenhower (R) 176,990 61.0% Adlai Stevenson (D) 112,880 38.9% T. Coleman Andrews (C) 303 0.1% 4
Richard Nixon (R) 221,241 55.5% John F. Kennedy (D) 176,781 44.4% Eric Hass (SLP) 469 0.1% 4
Barry Goldwater[c] (R) 242,535 50.4% Lyndon B. Johnson (D) 237,753 49.5% Eric Hass (SLP) 482 0.1% 5
Richard Nixon (R) 266,721 54.8% Hubert Humphrey (D) 170,514 35.0% George Wallace (AI) 46,573 9.6% 5
Richard Nixon (R) 402,812 64.7% George McGovern (D) 198,540 31.9% John G. Schmitz (AI) 21,208 3.4% 6
Gerald Ford (R) 418,642 56.4% Jimmy Carter (D) 295,602 39.8% Eugene McCarthy (I) 19,229 2.6% 6
Ronald Reagan (R) 529,688 60.6% Jimmy Carter (D) 246,843 28.2% John B. Anderson (I) 76,952 8.8% 6
Ronald Reagan (R) 681,416 66.4% Walter Mondale (D) 333,854 32.5% David Bergland (LI) 10,585 1.0% 7
George H. W. Bush (R) 702,541 60.0% Michael Dukakis (D) 454,029 38.7% Ron Paul (LI) 13,351 1.1% 7
George H. W. Bush (R) 572,086 38.5% Bill Clinton (D) 543,050 36.5% Ross Perot (I) 353,741 23.8% 8
Bill Clinton (D) 653,288 46.5% Bob Dole (R) 622,073 44.3% Ross Perot (RE) 112,072 8.0% 8
George W. Bush (R) 781,652 51.0% Al Gore (D) 685,341 44.7% Ralph Nader (G) 45,645 3.0% 8
George W. Bush (R) 1,104,294 54.9% John Kerry (D) 893,524 44.4% Michael Badnarik (LI) 11,856 0.6% 10
John McCain[d] (R) 1,230,111 53.6% Barack Obama (D) 1,034,707 45.1% Bob Barr (LI) 12,555 0.5% 10
Mitt Romney (R) 1,233,654 53.7% Barack Obama (D) 1,025,232 44.6% Gary Johnson (LI) 32,100 1.4% 11
Donald Trump (R) 1,252,401 48.7% Hillary Clinton (D) 1,161,167 45.1% Gary Johnson (LI) 106,327 4.1% 11
Joe Biden (D) 1,672,143 49.4% Donald Trump (R) 1,661,686 49.1% Jo Jorgensen (LI) 51,465 1.5% 11

Graph

See also

Notes

  1. ^ For purposes of these lists, other candidates are defined as those who were in third place in Arizona.
  2. ^ The incumbent president William Howard Taft finished fourth in Arizona, receiving 3,021 votes (12.8%).[2]
  3. ^ Arizona was the home state of Barry Goldwater.
  4. ^ Arizona was the home state of John McCain.

References

  1. ^ "Territories to Statehood, the Southwest: Topics in Chronicling America". Library of Congress. Archived from the original on September 15, 2021. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 777.
  3. ^ a b Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 783.
  4. ^ a b "State of Arizona Official Canvass – 1992 General Election – November 3, 1992" (PDF). Secretary of State of Arizona. November 23, 1992. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Official 2020 Presidential General Election Result" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 10, 2021. Retrieved August 7, 2021.
  6. ^ "Objection to Counting the Electoral Votes of the State of Arizona" (PDF). CNN. January 6, 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 2, 2021. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  7. ^ "Roll Call 10 – Motion". Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  8. ^ Billeaud, Jacques (December 16, 2020). "8th lawsuit fails to overturn presidential voting in Arizona". Associated Press. Archived from the original on February 23, 2021. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  9. ^ a b Hansen, Ronald J. (October 12, 2020). "Arizona was once a sure bet for Republicans. Now it's a key swing state in the election". The Arizona Republic. Archived from the original on October 8, 2021. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  10. ^ Widakuswara, Patsy (October 23, 2020). "These US 'Swing' States May Decide 2020 Election". Voice of America. Archived from the original on October 8, 2021. Retrieved October 8, 2021.
  11. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 106.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "1912 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 6, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  13. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 778.
  14. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 107.
  15. ^ Leip, David. "1916 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  16. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 779.
  17. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 108.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "1920 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  19. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 780.
  20. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 109.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "1924 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  22. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 781.
  23. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 110.
  24. ^ Leip, David. "1928 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  25. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 782.
  26. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 111.
  27. ^ Leip, David. "1932 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on December 1, 2017. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  28. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 112.
  29. ^ Leip, David. "1936 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  30. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 784.
  31. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 113.
  32. ^ Leip, David. "1940 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  33. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 785.
  34. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 114.
  35. ^ Leip, David. "1944 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  36. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 786.
  37. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 115.
  38. ^ Leip, David. "1948 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on October 7, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  39. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 787.
  40. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 116.
  41. ^ Leip, David. "1952 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on May 26, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  42. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 788.
  43. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 117.
  44. ^ Leip, David. "1956 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on December 14, 2017. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  45. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 789.
  46. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 118.
  47. ^ Leip, David. "1960 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on May 26, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  48. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 790.
  49. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 119.
  50. ^ Leip, David. "1964 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on December 9, 2006. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  51. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 791.
  52. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 120.
  53. ^ Leip, David. "1968 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on November 19, 2008. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  54. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 792.
  55. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 121.
  56. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 793.
  57. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 122.
  58. ^ Leip, David. "1976 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on December 2, 2008. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  59. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 794.
  60. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 123.
  61. ^ Leip, David. "1980 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on September 28, 2015. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  62. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 795.
  63. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 124.
  64. ^ Leip, David. "1984 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on December 2, 2008. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  65. ^ Guide to U.S. Elections 2010, p. 796.
  66. ^ Presidential elections 1997, p. 125.
  67. ^ Leip, David. "1988 Presidential General Election Results – Arizona". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Archived from the original on November 19, 2008. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  68. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass – 1996 General Election – November 5, 1996" (PDF). Secretary of State of Arizona. November 26, 1996. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 18, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  69. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass – 2000 General Election – November 7, 2000" (PDF). Secretary of State of Arizona. November 27, 2000. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 17, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  70. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass – 2004 General Election – November 2, 2004" (PDF). Secretary of State of Arizona. November 22, 2004. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 26, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  71. ^ "State of Arizona Official Canvass – 2008 General Election – November 4, 2008" (PDF). Secretary of State of Arizona. December 1, 2008. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  72. ^ "Election Results for the U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. p. 27. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 31, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2021.
  73. ^ "Election Results for the U.S. President, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. p. 25. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 31, 2021. Retrieved October 7, 2021.

Works cited