Timeline of the 1993 Pacific hurricane season

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Timeline of the
1993 Pacific hurricane season
A map of all tropical cyclones during the 1993 Pacific hurricane season
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedJune 11, 1993
Last system dissipatedOctober 14, 1993
Strongest system
NameLidia
Maximum winds240 km/h (150 mph)
(1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure930 hPa (mbar)
Longest lasting system
NameGreg
Duration14.00 days
Storm articles
Other years
1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995

The 1993 Pacific hurricane season was an event in the annual formation of tropical cyclones over the Pacific Ocean north of the Equator and east of the International Date Line. The season officially began on May 15 in the Eastern Pacific proper (east of 140°W) and June 1 in the Central Pacific (140°W to the International Date Line), and ended on November 30. These dates conventionally delineate the period each year during which tropical cyclones tend to form in the basin according to the National Hurricane Center.[1] A total of eighteen tropical depressions formed; fifteen of these developed into named tropical storms, of which eleven became hurricanes and nine became major hurricanes (Category 3 or higher on the Saffir–Simpson scale).[2] The number of tropical storms was near the long-term average; the number of hurricanes was slightly above average, and the number of major hurricanes was more than double the average of four.[1][3] As with many active Pacific hurricane seasons, El Niño conditions greatly influenced this season's high activity levels.[4] Several long-lived and powerful hurricanes contributed to an overall Accumulated Cyclone Energy value of 201.8 units, the eighth-highest on record for a Pacific hurricane season as of February 2024.[nb 1][6] The first system, Hurricane Adrian, developed on June 11; the final system, Tropical Depression Seventeen-E, dissipated on October 14.

The most impactful storm of the season was Hurricane Calvin, which made landfall near Manzanillo in the Mexican state of Colima as a Category 2 hurricane; it killed more than 30 people,[nb 2] mainly due to significant flooding, and damages amounted to $32 million (1993 USD).[10] Two months later, Hurricane Lidia came ashore at a similar intensity farther to the northwest along the coast of Sinaloa, where it caused considerable damage and multiple fatalities.[nb 3][3] In conjunction with a cold front, Lidia's remnants generated severe weather in Texas, including a tornado that caused $8 million (1993 USD) in damage.[12] Earlier in the season, Tropical Storm Beatriz killed 6 people in Mexico when it struck the southern portion of the country,[3] while Tropical Depression Three-E produced heavy rainfall that amounted to nearly a foot (12 in; 30.48 cm) in Acapulco despite remaining offshore.[13] Hurricane Hilary made three landfalls in Mexico – twice on the Baja California peninsula as a tropical storm, and then on the Mexican mainland as a tropical depression – but caused no loss of life and little damage.[14] Hurricanes Dora, Eugene, and Fernanda produced minor impacts in Hawaii; Eugene made landfall on the Big Island as a tropical depression, while Fernanda prompted the issuance of a hurricane warning, though this was discontinued when the storm turned away.[15]

Four time zones are utilized in the Eastern Pacific basin. They are, from east to west: Central east of 106°W; Mountain from 106°W to 114.9°W; Pacific from 115°W to 139.9°W; and Hawaii−Aleutian from 140°W to the International Date Line. For convenience, each event is listed in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) first, using the 24-hour clock (where 00:00 = midnight UTC),[16] with the respective local time included in parentheses. Figures for maximum sustained winds and position estimates are rounded to the nearest five units (knots, miles, or kilometers) and averaged over one minute, following National Hurricane Center practice. Direct wind observations are rounded to the nearest whole number. Atmospheric pressures are listed to the nearest millibar and nearest hundredth of an inch of mercury. This timeline documents the formation of tropical cyclones as well as the strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season. It includes information that was not released while the storm was active, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center is included.

Timeline of events

Hurricane GertHurricane Lidia (1993)Hurricane Hilary (1993)Hurricane Fernanda (1993)Hurricane Calvin (1993)Saffir–Simpson scale

May

May 15

  • The 1993 Eastern Pacific hurricane season officially begins.[1]
  • No tropical cyclones formed in May.

June

June 1

  • The 1993 Central Pacific hurricane season officially begins.[1]
A satellite image of a hurricane over the Eastern Pacific Ocean; there is a small core of dense white clouds with a tiny clearing near the center
Satellite image of Hurricane Adrian on June 15

June 11

June 12

June 15

June 16

June 17

A satellite image of a tropical storm near landfall
Satellite image of Tropical Storm Beatriz near landfall on June 19

June 18

June 19

June 20

June 27

A track map of a tropical depression near the western coast of Mexico. The path begins west-northwestward, then curves to the north-northwest about midway through the system's life
Storm path of Tropical Depression Three-E

June 30

July

July 2

July 4

A satellite image of a hurricane near the western coast of Mexico; the cloud pattern resembles a spiral near the center, with an elongated hook curving outwards
Satellite image of a strengthening Hurricane Calvin off the coast of Mexico on July 6

July 5

July 6

July 7

July 8

A track map of a hurricane near the western coast of Mexico. It starts moving slowly westward before turning north; it then accelerates northwestward along a relatively straight path before curving to the west-southwest at the end of its life.
Storm path of Hurricane Calvin

July 9

July 14

A satellite image of a well-organized hurricane over the Eastern Pacific Ocean; it has bands of spiral-shaped clouds, a round white area of clouds near the center of the storm, and a clear eye
Satellite image of Hurricane Dora at peak intensity on July 16

July 15

July 16

July 17

A track map of a hurricane over the Eastern Pacific Ocean; it is somewhat sinusoidal, starting westward before curving to the northwest, and then back to the west
Storm path of Hurricane Dora

July 18

July 19

A satellite image of a well-organized hurricane over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, with spiral bands; a dense, white, round mass of clouds in the middle; and a clear eye at the center. A large mass of thinner clouds to the northwest of the hurricane curves in tandem with the hurricane's circulation.
Satellite image of Hurricane Eugene near peak intensity on July 19

July 20

July 21

July 22

July 23

A track map of a hurricane over the Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean. It starts moving slowly westward before abruptly curving to the northwest; it then proceeds to very gradually curve back to the west in a manner that resembles an asymptotic graph.
Storm path of Hurricane Eugene

July 24

July 25

August

August 9

A satellite image of a well-organized hurricane with a tightly-wound circulation, spiral bands fanning out, and a clear eye; an arc of thin, high clouds is to the north and northwest of the hurricane
Satellite image of Hurricane Fernanda at Category 4 status on August 12

August 10

August 11

August 12

A track map of a hurricane across the Eastern and Central Pacific Ocean; it is a relatively straight west-northwestward track, curving northward at the end
Storm path of Hurricane Fernanda

August 13

August 14

August 15

A satellite image of a hurricane in the Central Pacific Ocean, with a circular cloud pattern and clear eye
Satellite image of a strengthening Hurricane Keoni on August 15

August 16

August 17

A track map of a hurricane across the Eastern Pacific; though the endpoints have multiple curves up and down, the middle is a mostly straight westward path
Storm path of Hurricane Greg

August 18

A satellite image of a hurricane over the Eastern Pacific Ocean with a nearly symmetrical, circulatr cloud shape, a clear eye, and light spiral bands
Satellite image of Hurricane Greg at peak intensity on August 19

August 19

August 20

A satellite image of a hurricane whose cloud pattern resembles the number 6, with a cloudy eye in the middle; some streaky but deep clouds in the lower right are those of a nearby tropical storm
Satellite image of Hurricane Hilary near peak intensity on August 21, with Tropical Storm Irwin visible to the lower right

August 21

August 22

A track map of a tropical storm just off the west coast of Mexico; it is short and generally northwestward
Storm path of Tropical Storm Irwin

August 23

August 25

August 26

A track map of a hurricane to the south and west of Mexico; the path very gradually curves from the west to the north, overall resembling the shape of a sideways parenthesis, with a knot near the middle where the hurricane made a small loop
Storm path of Hurricane Hilary

August 27

August 28

August 29

A track map of a hurricane parallel to the western coast of Mexico; it is generally west-northwestward, curving to the west near the end
Storm path of Hurricane Jova

August 31

September

September 1

September 2

A satellite image of a hurricane that looks like the number 6
Satellite image of Hurricane Jova shortly after peak intensity on September 1

September 3

September 4

September 5

September 6

A track map of a hurricane over the Eastern Pacific Ocean; it takes a sinusoidal shape while moving in a generally west-northwestward direction
Storm path of Hurricane Kenneth

September 8

September 9

September 10

September 11

A satellite image of two powerful hurricanes over the Eastern Pacific. One is larger than the other, but both are very well-organized with tightly-wound circulations, clear eyes, and thick, deep clouds.
Satellite image of Hurricanes Kenneth (left) and Lidia (right) both nearing peak intensity early on September 11

September 12

September 13

A track map of a hurricane. The track is shaped like a less-than symbol, paralleling the western coast of Mexico before making a 90-degree turn to the right
Storm path of Hurricane Lidia

September 14

September 15

September 16

September 17

A satellite image of a large tropical depression near Mexico, with thicker clouds in the south-central portion of its circulation
Satellite image of Tropical Depression Fourteen-E late on September 21

September 21

September 22

September 23

September 26

A track map of a tropical storm over the Eastern Pacific Ocean; it is shaped like an uppercase letter 'L', with the bottom edge curving upward like a camel's hump in the middle
Storm path of Tropical Storm Max

September 30

October

October 1

October 2

A satellite image of a sprawling but disorganized tropical storm over the Eastern Pacific Ocean
Satellite image of Tropical Storm Norma (center) shortly before absorbing Tropical Storm Max (bottom) late on October 3

October 3

October 4

October 5

October 6

October 11

October 12

A track map of a tropical depression which moves in a straight, northwestward fashion over the Eastern Pacific Ocean
Storm path of Tropical Depression Seventeen-E

October 14

November

  • No tropical cyclones formed in November.

November 30

  • The 1993 Pacific hurricane season officially ends.[1]

Notes

  1. ^ Broadly speaking, Accumulated Cyclone Energy is the square of a tropical cyclone's wind intensity in knots at 6-hour intervals, multiplied by the length of time it existed.[5]
  2. ^ Sources conflict on the exact number of deaths from Calvin. While the National Hurricane Center stated in their Preliminary Report for Calvin that 34 fatalities had occurred,[7] articles from Gulf News and the Los Angeles Times have given a death toll of 37.[8][9]
  3. ^ Sources conflict on the exact number of deaths from Lidia. A September 1993 article by the Oxnard Press-Courier stated that Lidia had killed 7 people,[11] while the National Hurricane Center's report on the season gave a death toll of 2.[3]
  4. ^ The National Hurricane Center and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center disagree on when Eugene entered the Central Pacific basin. In their overall report on the tropical cyclones which entered their area of responsibility (AOR) in 1993, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center states that Eugene did so at 18:00 UTC on July 22;[15] at this time, the National Hurricane Center lists Eugene's longitude as 139.8°W, just east of the Central Pacific basin limits.[28] As both agencies agree that Eugene was in the Central Pacific basin at 00:00 UTC on July 23, and because the National Hurricane Center's Preliminary Report on Eugene contains the storm's full track, the National Hurricane Center is given precedence.
  5. ^ The National Hurricane Center and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center disagree on when Fernanda entered the Central Pacific basin. In their overall report on the tropical cyclones which entered their AOR in 1993, the Central Pacific Hurricane Center states that Fernanda did so at 06:00 UTC on August 14;[15] at this time, the National Hurricane Center lists Fernanda's longitude as 139.6°W, just east of the Central Pacific basin limits.[30] As both agencies agree that Fernanda was in the Central Pacific basin at 12:00 UTC on August 14, and because the National Hurricane Center's Preliminary Report on Fernanda contains the storm's full track, the National Hurricane Center is given precedence.
  6. ^ Operationally, Tropical Storm Bret was redesignated as Tropical Depression Eight-E late on August 10 in anticipation that it would emerge over the Pacific Ocean as a tropical cyclone, though this did not occur.[31]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Tropical Cyclone Climatology". Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 23, 2024. Retrieved February 17, 2024.
  2. ^ National Hurricane Center; Hurricane Research Division; Central Pacific Hurricane Center (April 26, 2024). "The Northeast and North Central Pacific hurricane database 1949–2023". United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service. Archived from the original on May 29, 2024. A guide on how to read the database is available here. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ a b c d Avila, Lixion A.; Mayfield, Britt M. (March 1, 1995). "Eastern North Pacific Hurricane Season of 1993". Monthly Weather Review. 123 (3). American Meteorological Society: 1393–1410. Bibcode:1995MWRv..123..897A. doi:10.1175/1520-0493(1995)123<0897:ENPHSO>2.0.CO;2.
  4. ^ Jan Tenbruggencate (August 22, 1993). "Weird weather in the Pacific due to El Nino". The Honolulu Advertiser. Honolulu, Hawaii. p. 6. Archived from the original on February 23, 2024. Retrieved February 20, 2024 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Background information: Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season". United States Climate Prediction Center. May 22, 2019. Archived from the original on July 24, 2020. Retrieved February 20, 2024.
  6. ^ "Basin Archives: Northeast Pacific Ocean Historical Tropical Cyclone Statistics". Fort Collins, Colorado: Colorado State University. Archived from the original on December 17, 2023. Retrieved February 20, 2024.
  7. ^ Rappaport, Edward (August 2, 1993). Hurricane Calvin Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 15, 2024. Retrieved February 15, 2024.
  8. ^ Kareem, Abdul (July 6, 2018). "July 7, 1993: Hurricane Calvin kills 37 in Mexico". Gulf News. Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Archived from the original on February 15, 2024. Retrieved February 15, 2024.
  9. ^ Darling, Juanita (July 9, 1993). "Death Toll 37 in Mexico as Storm Heads Out to Sea : Disaster: About a third of nation is under state of emergency. Officials report 42,000 homeless". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, California. Archived from the original on February 15, 2024. Retrieved February 15, 2024.
  10. ^ Rappaport, Edward (August 2, 1993). Hurricane Calvin Preliminary Report (Page Four) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 20, 2024. Retrieved February 20, 2024.
  11. ^ "Storm kills 7, forces evacuations". Oxnard Press-Courier. Associated Press. September 18, 1993. Retrieved February 20, 2024.
  12. ^ "Texas reeling from series of tornadoes". The Tuscaloosa News. Associated Press. September 14, 1993. Retrieved February 20, 2024.
  13. ^ a b c Pasch, Richard J. (November 18, 1993). Tropical Depression Three-E Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on January 2, 2022. Retrieved January 31, 2024.
  14. ^ a b c d Rappaport, Edward (September 27, 1993). Hurricane Hilary Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 3, 2024. Retrieved February 3, 2024.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Tropical Cyclones 1993 (PDF) (Report). Central Pacific Hurricane Center. Archived (PDF) from the original on February 7, 2024. Retrieved February 1, 2024.
  16. ^ "Understanding the Date/Time Stamps". Silver Spring, Maryland: National Weather Service. Archived from the original on February 26, 2023. Retrieved February 23, 2024.
  17. ^ a b c d Lawrence, Miles (July 10, 1993). Hurricane Adrian Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on July 15, 2023. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g Lawrence, Miles (July 10, 1993). Hurricane Adrian Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on July 15, 2023. Retrieved January 31, 2024.
  19. ^ a b c Mayfield, Max (July 31, 1993). Tropical Storm Beatriz Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  20. ^ a b c d Mayfield, Max (July 31, 1993). Tropical Storm Beatriz Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on January 31, 2024. Retrieved January 31, 2024.
  21. ^ a b c d Pasch, Richard J. (November 18, 1993). Tropical Depression Three-E Preliminary Report (Page Two) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on January 31, 2024. Retrieved January 31, 2024.
  22. ^ a b c Rappaport, Edward (August 2, 1993). Hurricane Calvin Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i Rappaport, Edward (August 2, 1993). Hurricane Calvin Preliminary Report (Page Five) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on January 31, 2024. Retrieved January 31, 2024.
  24. ^ a b Rappaport, Edward (August 2, 1993). Hurricane Calvin Preliminary Report (Page Two) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  25. ^ a b c d e f Avila, Lixion (1993). Hurricane Dora Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Avila, Lixion (1993). Hurricane Dora Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved January 31, 2024.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g Lawrence, Miles (October 7, 1993). Hurricane Eugene Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Lawrence, Miles (October 7, 1993). Hurricane Eugene Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 1, 2024. Retrieved February 1, 2024.
  29. ^ a b c d e Mayfield, Max (October 19, 1993). Hurricane Fernanda Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on March 13, 2016. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Mayfield, Max (October 19, 1993). Hurricane Fernanda Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved February 2, 2024.
  31. ^ Mayfield, Max (August 10, 1993). Tropical Depression Eight-E Discussion Number 1 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on November 12, 2023. Retrieved April 29, 2024.
  32. ^ a b c d e f Pasch, Richard J. (November 28, 1993). Hurricane Greg Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Pasch, Richard J. (November 28, 1993). Hurricane Greg Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 2, 2024. Retrieved February 2, 2024.
  34. ^ a b c d Rappaport, Edward (September 27, 1993). Hurricane Hilary Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on November 3, 2023. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Rappaport, Edward (September 27, 1993). Hurricane Hilary Preliminary Report (Page Four) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on August 25, 2008. Retrieved February 3, 2024.
  36. ^ a b c d Avila, Lixion A. (October 19, 1993). Tropical Storm Irwin Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  37. ^ a b c d Avila, Lixion A. (October 19, 1993). Tropical Storm Irwin Preliminary Report (Page Two) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 3, 2024. Retrieved February 3, 2024.
  38. ^ a b c d e f Pasch, Richard J. (November 28, 1993). Hurricane Greg Preliminary Report (Page Two) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  39. ^ a b c d e Rappaport, Edward (September 27, 1993). Hurricane Hilary Preliminary Report (Page Two) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  40. ^ a b c d e Lawrence, Miles (October 21, 1993). Hurricane Jova Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Lawrence, Miles (October 21, 1993). Hurricane Jova Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on September 7, 2023. Retrieved February 3, 2024.
  42. ^ a b c d e f g Mayfield, Max (October 19, 1993). Hurricane Kenneth Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  43. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Mayfield, Max (October 19, 1993). Hurricane Kenneth Preliminary Report (Page Three) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on September 7, 2023. Retrieved February 3, 2024.
  44. ^ a b c Pasch, Richard J. (November 28, 1993). Hurricane Lidia Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  45. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Pasch, Richard J. (November 28, 1993). Hurricane Lidia Preliminary Report (Page Four) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on September 7, 2023. Retrieved February 4, 2024.
  46. ^ a b c d Pasch, Richard J. (November 28, 1993). Hurricane Lidia Preliminary Report (Page Two) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  47. ^ a b c d Rappaport, Edward (September 29, 1993). Tropical Depression Fourteen-E Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on October 7, 2023. Retrieved February 4, 2024.
  48. ^ a b c d e Avila, Lixion A. (October 29, 1993). Tropical Storm Max Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  49. ^ a b c d e f g Avila, Lixion A. (October 29, 1993). Tropical Storm Max Preliminary Report (Page Two) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 4, 2024. Retrieved February 4, 2024.
  50. ^ a b c d Lawrence, Miles (October 21, 1993). Tropical Storm Norma Preliminary Report (Page One) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 6, 2024. Retrieved February 6, 2024.
  51. ^ a b c d e Lawrence, Miles (October 21, 1993). Tropical Storm Norma Preliminary Report (Page Two) (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on February 4, 2024. Retrieved February 4, 2024.
  52. ^ a b c Mayfield, Max (October 16, 1993). Tropical Depression Seventeen-E Preliminary Report (GIF) (Report). National Hurricane Center. Archived from the original on January 4, 2022. Retrieved February 4, 2024.

External links