Bids for Commonwealth Games

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Bids for Commonwealth Games is the process where Commonwealth Games Associations select from within their national territory cities to put forward bids to host a Commonwealth Games. Since the creation of the Commonwealth Games Federation in 1932, which successfully appropriated the name of the Inter-Empire Championships to create a modern sporting event for the members of the Commonwealth, interested cities have rivalled for selection as host of the Commonwealth Games.

What follows is a list of the cities that have bid to host any of the Commonwealth Games. 20 cities (including repeats) have been chosen to host the Commonwealth Games; four in America, two in Asia, six in Europe, one in the Caribbean and seven in Oceania. No African city has ever been chosen to host a Commonwealth Games.

Process

The General Assembly of the CGF is responsible for deciding who will host the Commonwealth Games, 8 years prior to the games in question once all bids have been submitted. The selection process is made in accordance with the Candidate City Manual, as drafted by the Executive Board and made available to candidates 18 months before a decision is made. The federation then entrusts the organisation of the games to the organising committee, CGA, and government of the winning host nation or territory, including the security and finance, but is still monitored by the federation.[1]

Commonwealth Games

Games Year Bid party Result Final selection process Note Ref.
City CGAs Date CGF General Assembly
I 1930 Hamilton  Canada Awarded to host the I Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [2]
II 1934 Johannesburg  South Africa Awarded to host the II Commonwealth Games (moved to London) [note 1] [3]
London  England Inherently awarded to host the II Commonwealth Games
III 1938 Sydney  Australia Awarded to host the III Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [4]
1942 Montreal  Canada Awarded to host the IV Commonwealth Games (cancelled) [note 2]
1946 Cardiff  Wales Awarded to host the IV Commonwealth Games (cancelled) [note 3]
IV 1950 Auckland  New Zealand Awarded to host the IV Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [5]
V 1954 Vancouver  Canada Awarded to host the V Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [6]
VI 1958 Cardiff  Wales Awarded to host the VI Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [7]
VII 1962 Perth  Australia Awarded to host the VII Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [8]
VIII 1966 Kingston  Jamaica Awarded to host the VIII Commonwealth Games (17 votes) Rome [9]
Edinburgh  Scotland Eliminated in the first voting (12 votes)
Salisbury  Rhodesia and Nyasaland Eliminated in the first voting (5 votes)
IX 1970 Edinburgh  Scotland Awarded to host the IX Commonwealth Games (18 votes) Kingston [10]
Christchurch  New Zealand Eliminated in the first voting (11 votes)
X 1974 Christchurch  New Zealand Awarded to host the X Commonwealth Games (36 votes) Edinburgh [11]
Melbourne  Australia Eliminated in the first voting (2 votes)
XI 1978 Edmonton  Canada Awarded to host the XI Commonwealth Games (36 votes) Munich [12]
Leeds  England Eliminated in the first voting (10 votes)
XII 1982 Brisbane  Australia Awarded to host the XII Commonwealth Games (unanimous vote) 14 July 1976 Montreal [13]
Birmingham  England Withdrew during the candidature stage
Kuala Lumpur  Malaysia Withdrew during the candidature stage
Lagos  Nigeria Withdrew during the candidature stage
XIII 1986 Edinburgh  Scotland Awarded to host the XIII Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [14]
XIV 1990 Auckland  New Zealand Awarded to host the XIV Commonwealth Games (20 votes) Los Angeles [15]
Delhi  India Eliminated in the first voting (19 votes)
XV 1994 Victoria  Canada Awarded to host the XV Commonwealth Games (29 votes) Seoul [16]
Cardiff  Wales Eliminated in the first voting (18 votes)
Delhi  India Eliminated in the first voting (7 votes)
XVI 1998 Kuala Lumpur  Malaysia Awarded to host the XVI Commonwealth Games (40 votes) Barcelona [17]
Adelaide  Australia Eliminated in the first voting (25 votes)
XVII 2002 Manchester  England Awarded to host the XVII Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [18]
XVIII 2006 Melbourne  Australia Awarded to host the XVIII Commonwealth Games (sole bid) [19]
XIX 2010 Delhi  India Awarded to host the XIX Commonwealth Games (46 votes) 14 November 2003 Montego Bay [20][21]
Hamilton  Canada Eliminated in the first voting (22 votes)
XX 2014 Glasgow  Scotland Awarded to host the XX Commonwealth Games (47 votes) 9 November 2007 Colombo [22][23]
Abuja  Nigeria Eliminated in the first voting (24 votes)
Halifax  Canada Withdrew during the candidature stage
XXI 2018 Gold Coast  Australia Awarded to host the XXI Commonwealth Games (43 votes) 11 November 2011 Basseterre [24][25]
Hambantota  Sri Lanka Eliminated in the first voting (27 votes)
XXII 2022 Durban  South Africa Awarded to host the XXII Commonwealth Games and later withdrew 2 September 2015 Auckland [26][27]
Edmonton  Canada Withdrew during the candidature stage
Birmingham  England Awarded to host the XXII Commonwealth Games (sole bid) 21 December 2017 Birmingham [28][29]
XXIII 2026 Victoria  Australia Awarded to host the XXIII Commonwealth Games (sole bid) 12 April 2022 Ballarat [30]

Notes

  1. ^ The 1934 British Empire Games (now known as the Commonwealth Games) was originally awarded to Johannesburg, South Africa but was later awarded to London, England. The reason for this change was to avoid a political crisis over South Africa's Apartheid policy and its implications on visiting Commonwealth athletes and officials. The move came after concerns, particularly from Canada, about the way South Africa would treat black and Asian athletes."1934 - London". Inside the Games. Archived from the original on 2016-08-05. Retrieved 2020-01-29.
  2. ^ The 1942 British Empire Games (now known as the Commonwealth Games) was cancelled due to the second world war. "What are the Commonwealth Games and who takes part?". BBC. Archived from the original on 2014-03-09. Retrieved 2020-01-29.
  3. ^ The 1946 British Empire Games (now known as the Commonwealth Games) was cancelled due to the second world war. "What are the Commonwealth Games and who takes part?". BBC. Archived from the original on 2014-03-09. Retrieved 2020-01-29.

References

  1. ^ "Byelaw 12 Bid Procedures and the Host City" (PDF). Constitutional Documents of the Commonwealth Games Federation. CGF. p. 35. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-06-08. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  2. ^ "Hamilton 1930 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  3. ^ "London 1934 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  4. ^ "Sydney 1938 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  5. ^ "Auckland 1950 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  6. ^ "Vancouver 1954 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  7. ^ "Cardiff 1958 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  8. ^ "Perth 1962 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  9. ^ "Kingston 1966 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  10. ^ "Edinburgh 1970 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  11. ^ "Christchurch 1974 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  12. ^ "Edmonton 1978 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  13. ^ "Brisbane 1982 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  14. ^ "Edinburgh 1986 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  15. ^ "Auckland 1990 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  16. ^ "Victoria 1994 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  17. ^ "Kuala Lumpur 1998 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  18. ^ "Manchester 2002 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  19. ^ "Melbourne 2006 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  20. ^ "Delhi 2010 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  21. ^ "Delhi wins vote". 2003-11-14. Retrieved 2020-05-02.
  22. ^ "Glasgow 2014 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  23. ^ Wilson, Chris (2007-11-09). "Glasgow wins Games bid". mirror. Retrieved 2020-05-02.
  24. ^ "Gold Coast 2018 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  25. ^ Candice Marshall (2011-11-10). "Gold Coast wins Commonwealth Games bid". www.abc.net.au. Retrieved 2020-05-02.
  26. ^ "Commonwealth Games: Durban confirmed as 2022 host city". BBC Sport. 2015-09-02. Retrieved 2020-05-02.
  27. ^ "Commonwealth Games: Durban, South Africa will not host Games in 2022". BBC Sport. 2017-03-13. Retrieved 2020-05-02.
  28. ^ "Birmingham 2022 | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2020-01-28.
  29. ^ "Commonwealth Games Federation selects Birmingham as Host City Partner of the 2022 Commonwealth Games | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2022-05-18.
  30. ^ "CGF confirm Victoria, Australia as host of 2026 Commonwealth Games | Commonwealth Games Federation". thecgf.com. Retrieved 2022-05-18.