2024 Rio Grande do Sul floods

Page semi-protected
Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

2024 Rio Grande do Sul floods
Porto Alegre during the floods
Date29 April 2024 (2024-04-29) – ongoing
Location
Deaths155[1]
Non-fatal injuries806+[2]
Missing89[1]
Property damageR$19 billion (US$3.7 billion)[3]

The 2024 Rio Grande do Sul floods are severe floods caused by heavy rains and storms that have hit the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, and the adjacent Uruguayan cities of Treinta y Tres, Paysandú, Cerro Largo, and Salto. From 29 April 2024 through to May 2024,[4] it resulted in over 150 fatalities,[1] widespread landslides, and a dam collapse. It is considered the country's worst flooding in over 80 years.[4]

The floods marked the fourth such environmental disaster in Brazil in the same solar year, following similar calamities that killed 75 people in July, September, and November 2023.[5][6]

Meteorological history

Satellite images of the affected areas on 6 May (top) and 20 April (bottom), during and before the floods

An atmospheric block, caused by a high-pressure system in Centro-Sul, prevented the displacement of typical meteorological systems (such as extratropical cyclones, cold fronts, and troughs) that cause precipitation.[7] In the areas where the anticyclone was active, temperatures were 5 to 10 °C (9.0 to 18.0 °F) higher than the record values recorded by the National Institute of Meteorology (INMET), since areas of instability were confined to the state of Rio Grande do Sul.[8] On 22 April, the Civil Defense of Rio Grande do Sul issued a meteorological alert, later updated, warning of the risk of disruptions due to isolated storms and locally intense rains, which could cause flooding and power cuts.[9] In the following days, the Civil Defense kept issuing alerts, along with forecasts for adverse weather conditions.[10]

Heavy rain and strong winds started hitting the northern part of the state on 28 April; by the following day, they had spread to almost the entire state. Storms occurring between 28 April and 1 May were caused by a cold front associated with a low-pressure area over the sea, while also being influenced by a moisture flow coming from the north of the country.[11] According to an INMET report, rainfall reached over 150 millimetres (5.91 in) in some parts of Rio Grande do Sul in 24 hours on 30 April;[12] they later reported that the average precipitation in the Porto Alegre area in the first twelve days of May could amount up to 333.1 millimetres (13.11 in), almost thrice the average monthly value recorded between 1991 and 2020 (113 millimetres (4.4 in)).[2]

Relationship with climate change

In 2015, the report "Brazil 2040: scenarios and adaptation alternatives to climate change," commissioned in 2014 by Dilma Rousseff's administration and conducted by several research institutions in the country, already showed the trend of increased rainfall in the South of Brazil due to climate change. The report pointed to an increase of more than 15% in the level of rainfall in the southernmost region of the country.[13] Other climatologists, such as Paulo Artaxo, a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Carlos Nobre, a researcher at the National Institute for Space Research, and Marcio Astrini, executive secretary of the Climate Observatory, also correlated the frequent floods in the South of Brazil with the impacts of global warming in Brazil and the lack of public policies to mitigate these effects.[14][15][16]

Impact

Victims

Greater Porto Alegre during the flood
Guaíba Bridge on 5 May 2024 between Eldorado do Sul and Porto Alegre

Across all regions of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, at least 144 people were killed, 806 others were injured, and 131 were left missing in the floods.[17][2][18] At least 327,100 others were displaced from their homes, around 68,500 of whom are in shelters.[2] AFP reported that two more people died in an explosion at a flooded gas station in Porto Alegre, where rescue crews were attempting to refuel their vehicles.[19] The flooding was exacerbated by the partial collapse of the 14 de Julho hydroelectric dam located in the Das Antas River between the municipalities of Cotiporã and Bento Gonçalves,[6][20] which left at least 30 people killed;[5] four other dams across the state were also considered at risk of collapse.[4] Another victim was reported in the nearby state of Santa Catarina,[5][19] as one man died in the municipality of Ipira.[19]

Other impacts

Porto Alegre–Salgado Filho International Airport covered by the flooding

Over 500,000 people were left without power and clean water across Rio Grande do Sul,[21][22][23] and flood damage occurred in 431 of the state's 497 municipalities,[2] while many roads and bridges were destroyed and landslides occurred.[21][5][6] Communication via internet and telephone services was also cut off by the floods in over 85 municipalities, with all of the three main providers (TIM, Vivo, and Claro) having their services affected and offering temporarily free Internet access via roaming to their clients.[24]

Entire cities in the Taquari River valley, such as Lajeado, Estrela,[6] Muçum, Cruzeiro do Sul, and Arroio do Meio,[25] were made temporarily inaccessible by the effects of the floods.[6][25] The banks of the local river in Gravataí were also considered to be at the edge of collapsing, as four of the city's treatment plants had to be closed momentarily.[19]

In Porto Alegre, the Guaíba Lake rose up to 5.31 m (17.4 ft),[25] thus beating the previous record 4.76 m (15.6 ft) set during the 1941 floods,[19][25][26] as most areas of the city were flooded, with more than 60 streets becoming completely inaccessible and more than 10 being partially blocked;[25][26] rescue workers used four-wheel-drive vehicles, boats, and jet skis in order to maneuver through flooded streets in search of stranded and missing people.[5][19][25] Eldorado do Sul, a city in the Greater Porto Alegre region, was also hit by the flood, completely being engulfed by it. The mayor said that "the city has been 100% destroyed by these floods."[27]

Across almost all affected municipalities, classes were suspended, with 386 schools suffering damage and 52 being repurposed as shelters.[24] According to governor Eduardo Leite, the reconstruction costs of affected cities could reach R$19 billion (US$3.7 billion).[3] The flood displaced more than 700 people in Uruguay,[28] and it shut down several rural schools.[29]

Ten aircraft have been damaged, including PR-AJN Embraer EMB-505 Phenom 300, PR-DCL Beechcraft C90GTx King Air, PR-FHT Embraer EMB-500 Phenom 100, PR-SCC Cessna T206H Stationair TC, PR-TTP Boeing 727-2M7(A)(F) Total Linhas Aéreas SA, PS-CNB Cessna 208B Grand Caravan EX Azul, PS-LCA Pilatus PC-24, Piper PA-46-500TP M500, PT-OSW BAe 125-800B, and the museum PP-ANU DC-3 Varig Exposition.[30][31][32]

Aftermath

Food storage for victims in Porto Alegre

The floods were considered the worst to hit Brazil in over 80 years,[4] and marked the fourth such environmental disaster in a solar year, as previous floods killed 75 people between July, September, and November 2023.[5][6]

Climatologist Francisco Eliseu Aquino told AFP that, while the region was already prone to extreme climate events caused by the collision of tropical and polar air masses, these events had "intensified" due to the effects of climate change,[5][19] stating that the storms were the result of a "disastrous cocktail" of global warming and the El Niño climate phenomenon.[19]

All the main transportation services in Porto Alegre, including the Salgado Filho International Airport,[19][25] the Metro,[33] and local bus services,[34] suspended their activities for an undetermined period.[19][34]

On 1 May, the Brazilian Football Confederation announced the postponement of all of the matches across the region throughout that week, including Série A, Copa do Brasil, Brasileirão Feminino, Série C, and Série D matches.[35][36] Following an official request filed by regional-based clubs Internacional, Grêmio and Juventude, whose stadiums, Federação Gaúcha de Futebol,[37] and training facilities were all temporarily unavailable due to the floods,[37][38] the CBF postponed the games for a further twenty days on 7 May.[39][40][41] When Internacional and Grêmio were competing in the Copa Sudamericana and the Copa Libertadores, respectively, both had two of their group-stage matches postponed by CONMEBOL at the time of the disaster.[42]

Reactions and humanitarian efforts

In the immediate aftermath of the floods, the governor of Rio Grande do Sul, Eduardo Leite, said that the floods were an "absolutely unprecedented emergency",[5] and "the worst climate disaster" the state had ever witnessed,[19][43] even more so than the previous year's floods.[43] On 1 May, the local government officially declared a 180-day long state of emergency.[43][44] On 5 May, it was announced that the government had approved a R$117.7 million (US$21.8 million) worth package aimed to restore the state's infrastructures left damaged by the floods.[45]

President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva flying over flooded areas in Canoas on 5 May 2024

President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva visited Rio Grande do Sul on 2 May,[12][46] holding a public speech in Santa Maria.[46] The federal government sent aircraft, boats, and more than 600 soldiers to help clear roads, distribute food, water, and mattresses, and set up shelters, while local volunteers also helped with search efforts.[4] More than 1,100 soldiers from the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force, as well as more than 2,000 between BMRS officers and firefighters, were reportedly involved in rescue operations across the state.[47] National Force and Civil Defense members were also sent by the state governments of Bahia, Espírito Santo, Goiás, Mato Grosso, Minas Gerais, Paraná, Rio de Janeiro, Santa Catarina, and São Paulo.[47] The National Army also installed a 40-bed field hospital in the municipality of Lajeado.[47]

Flamengo, Palmeiras, São Paulo, and Atlético Mineiro all offered their stadiums and facilities to the affected football clubs;[48][49] the latter team also made a R$100,000 (US$20,000) worth donation to the regional charity fund through their Instituto Galo foundation,[50] and other Série A and Série B teams shared details about fundraising campaigns on social media,[51] while the CBF donated R$1 million (US$200,000) to the victims and opened a parallel campaign.[52] Starting from 6 May, the Civil Defense hosted a charity campaign for food donations in São José do Rio Preto.[53]

President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Vice President Geraldo Alckmin, the Minister of Finance Fernando Haddad, and other government officials announcing federal resources for Rio Grande do Sul on 9 May 2024

On 5 May, after delivering the Angelus Address in St. Peter's Square in the Vatican City, Pope Francis expressed his solidarity to the victims of the floods;[54][55] several other figures of the Brazilian Catholic Church commented on the disaster, including Archbishop of Porto Alegre and CNBB president, Jaime Spengler,[54][55] as well as Archbishop of Santa Maria, Leomar Antônio Brustolin.[56]

On 9 May, the Brazilian government, through the Minister of Finance, Fernando Haddad, announced R$51 billion (US$10 billion) in resources and benefits for the state of Rio Grande do Sul.[57][58] The state-owned national bank Caixa Econômica Federal announced another R$66.8 billion (US$13.1 billion) in forms of financing and benefits.[57]

Mobilization of military resources

On 6 May, the Brazilian Navy announced the dispatch of the largest warship in South America, the helicopter carrier NAM Atlântico, which would depart Rio de Janeiro and head to the coast of Rio Grande do Sul. Atlântico was expected to carry 200 Marine Corps officers, 40 vehicles and eight between medium, and small vessels to help rescue stranded victims and transport supplies through flooded roads.[59][60]

The Navy also mobilized the Oceanic Support Ship Mearim and the Oceanic Patrol Ship Amazonas, with the latter carrying three small vessels. The two ships sailed to Rio Grande do Sul on 7 May. The following day, the frigate Defensora was also dispatched in order to transport donations and supplies.[60] As of 11 May, 12,000 Brazilian armed forces personnel are on the ground for the relief operations.[61]

Brazilian Navy helicopter over flooded areas on 4 May 2024

Civil society

Since the start of the heavy rains, civilian volunteers have mobilized to rescue marooned families and to assist families rescued in gyms, schools, and churches.[62][63][64] They used all-terrain vehicles, trucks, boats, water motorcycles, and other transportation to rescue people and animals from flooded areas.[62] Residents of less affected cities also organized themselves to support the search for and assistance to homeless families, as was the case with residents of the municipality of Portão, in Porto Alegre, who formed a network of around 100 volunteers to work in the neighboring cities of São Leopoldo, São Sebastião do Caí, and Montenegro.[62] Some volunteers also started using their own homes as shelters for the people affected or as kitchens to produce meals.[62] In some cases, volunteers used surfboards to search for and rescue the people who were affected.[63] Volunteers also focused on rescuing and sheltering pets; in some warehouses, shelters were set up to receive dogs and cats.[65][66] In Canoas, a makeshift center had already received 600 dogs as of 7 May 2024.[65] Due to the insufficient number of fire departments, civil defense, and armed forces personnel in some areas of the state at the beginning of the relief operations, some people waited three days to be rescued.[63] On 5 May 2024, the mayor of Canoas, Jairo Jorge, asked boat owners to help in the search voluntarily.[67]

As a measure to speed up rescues, a group from Centro Universitário Ritter dos Reis voluntarily and independently created an internet platform as a way of centralizing rescue efforts and also making it possible to make requests for help, with requests for help being transformed into geolocation points with routes to the location.[68] As of 9 May 2024, it had already collaborated with more than 12,000 rescues.[68] Other independent initiatives, such as Projeto Salva, support flood victims and animal rescues.[68] Around 20 private helicopters have been used voluntarily to rescue people affected by the floods. On 10 May, private aircraft departing from São Paulo were responsible for transporting 2.5 tons of donations.[69]

Universo Online reported that a group of volunteers were forced to retrieve thousands of firearms at Salgado Filho Porto Alegre International Airport by a representative of arms manufacturer Taurus Armas, saying that the representative misled them into launching what they were initially told to be rescue operations for people stranded at the airport, who then threatened to have them detained if they refused to proceed on security grounds.[70]

International aid for humanitarian assistance

Venezuela, Uruguay, Argentina, and the United States offered humanitarian help to the Brazilian authorities.[71]

On 3 May, the Venezuelan Foreign Minister, Yván Gil, offered the Brazilian government support on behalf of the Venezuelan government and President Nicolás Maduro.[72]

On 5 May, the government of Uruguay sent an Air Force (FAU) Delfin Bell 212 helicopter and its crew to Brazil and offered two drones and two rescue boats to assist in the rescues.[71] A Lockheed Martin KC-130 plane from the FAU with equipment and humanitarian aid was also offered but was refused by Brazilian authorities due to a lack of proper aerodromes which were equally damaged by the floods.[73][74]

On 6 May, the Argentine government, led by President Javier Milei, announced that they would send 20 Federal Police officers and divers from the Argentine Navy, as well as three helicopters and a C-130 cargo plane from the Argentine Air Force.[75]

On 10 May, the White House National Security Advisor, John Kirby, announced a donation of US$120,000 in resources and hygiene kits from the United States.[76]

References

  1. ^ a b c "Defesa Civil atualiza balanço das enchentes no RS - 19/5, 9h". Portal do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (in Portuguese). 19 May 2024. Retrieved 19 May 2024.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Temporais no RS: sobe para 113 o número de mortes". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). Grupo Globo. 10 May 2024. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  3. ^ a b "Reconstrução do Rio Grande do Sul vai custar pelo menos R$ 19 bilhões, diz Leite". O Globo (in Portuguese). 9 May 2024. Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  4. ^ a b c d e "'It's going to be worse': Brazil braces for more pain amid record flooding". Al Jazeera. 4 May 2024. Archived from the original on 4 May 2024. Retrieved 4 May 2024.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h "Le disastrose alluvioni nel sud del Brasile". Il Post (in Italian). 5 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Brazil: 37 killed and dozens missing in worst floods in 80 years". The Guardian. Associated Press. 3 May 2024. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 5 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  7. ^ "Onda de calor no Brasil piorará com recordes históricos e até 40ºC". MetSul Meteorologia (in Brazilian Portuguese). 26 April 2024. Archived from the original on 5 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  8. ^ "Bloqueio atmosférico: entenda o fenômeno responsável pela onda de calor". Jornal Estado de Minas (in Brazilian Portuguese). 3 May 2024. Archived from the original on 4 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  9. ^ Trinidade, Pedro (22 April 2024). "RS tem alerta para chuvas fortes, descargas elétricas e risco de alagamentos, diz Defesa Civil". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  10. ^ "Temporais no RS: Defesa Civil faz 'orientação expressa' para evacuação de áreas de risco no Vale do Taquari". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). 2 May 2024. Archived from the original on 3 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  11. ^ "Frente fria vai avançar pelo RS e SC com mais chuva intensa e temporais". MetSul Meteorologia (in Brazilian Portuguese). 1 May 2024. Archived from the original on 4 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  12. ^ a b Gilbody Dickerson, Claire (3 May 2024). "Brazil floods: 29 people killed and thousands more displaced". Sky News. Archived from the original on 3 May 2024. Retrieved 4 May 2024.
  13. ^ Dias, Tatiana (6 May 2024). "Enchentes no RS: leia o relatório de 2015 que projetou o desastre – e os governos escolheram engavetar". Intercept Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  14. ^ Mori, Letícia (4 May 2024). "'Tragédia no RS é responsabilidade também de senadores e deputados que desmontam legislação ambiental', diz secretário do Observatório do Clima". BBC News (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  15. ^ Bocuhy, Carlos (6 May 2024). "Rio Grande do Sul: governança para prevenir desastres climáticos". Apoie o Jornalismo Ambiental (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  16. ^ "Chuva no Rio Grande do Sul e crise climática: 'Até quando vamos correr atrás do prejuízo?'". O Estado de S. Paulo (in Brazilian Portuguese). 2 May 2024. Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  17. ^ "Brazil floods: More rains expected, as people await rescue". rtvonline.com. RTV Online. 11 May 2024. Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 11 May 2024.
  18. ^ Rios, Michael; Cotovio, Vasco; Alvarado, Abel (9 May 2024). "More intense rain expected as Brazilian flood death toll reaches 107". CNN. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Fabal, Carlos (4 May 2024). "Floods In Southern Brazil Kill 55, Force 70,000 From Homes". Agence France-Presse. Barron's. Archived from the original on 5 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  20. ^ Leão, Luan (2 May 2024). "Rompimento de barragem no RS: veja cidades ameaçadas e com ordem para moradores buscarem abrigos". CNN Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 4 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  21. ^ a b "Rains in southern Brazil kill at least 39, some 70 still missing". Reuters. 3 May 2024. Archived from the original on 3 May 2024. Retrieved 4 May 2024.
  22. ^ "Temporais no RS: Defesa Civil confirma 66 mortes e investiga outros 6 óbitos". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). 5 May 2024. Archived from the original on 5 May 2024. Retrieved 5 May 2024.
  23. ^ Rocha, Leonardo; Lukiv, Jaroslav (3 May 2024). "Brazil floods: Dam collapses and death toll rises in Rio Grande do Sul". BBC News. Archived from the original on 3 May 2024. Retrieved 4 May 2024.
  24. ^ a b "Sobe para 85 o número de mortos após enchentes que atingem o RS". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). 6 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g Zanatta, Pedro; Rigue, André; Lauxen, Nathalia (6 May 2024). "Cidades do Rio Grande do Sul continuam isoladas pelo 5º dia após chuvas devastadoras". CNN Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 6 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  26. ^ a b "Guaíba passa dos 5 metros e Porto Alegre amanhece com mais regiões atingidas pela enchente". Correio do Povo (in Brazilian Portuguese). 4 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  27. ^ Cidade está 100% destruída", diz prefeito de Eldorado do Sul. 5 May 2024. Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024 – via YouTube.
  28. ^ "Más de 700 desplazados en Uruguay tras las severas inundaciones en cinco provincias del país" [More than 700 displaced in Uruguay after severe flooding in five provinces of the country]. infobae.com (in Spanish). 8 May 2024. Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  29. ^ "Las inundaciones por el desborde de ríos provocan la evacuación de familias y el cierre de escuelas rurales en Uruguay" [Floods due to overflowing rivers cause the evacuation of families and the closure of rural schools in Uruguay]. infobae (in Spanish). 8 May 2024. Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  30. ^ Martins, Carlos (6 May 2024). "Aeroporto de Porto Alegre poderá ficar fechado até o final do mês". AEROIN (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  31. ^ Martins, Carlos (6 May 2024). "Avião Cessna da Azul fica alagado no Aeroporto de Porto Alegre". AEROIN (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  32. ^ "ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 387742". Aviation Safety Network. 5 May 2024. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  33. ^ Pelegi, Alexandre (4 May 2024). "Trens da Trensurb deixam de circular na tarde dessa sexta-feira (03), e operações só devem ser retomadas na segunda (06)". Diário do Transporte (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 5 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  34. ^ a b "Rodoviária de Porto Alegre fica totalmente alagada e viagens são canceladas". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). 4 May 2024. Archived from the original on 6 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  35. ^ "Nota Oficial: Jogos no Rio Grande do Sul" (in Brazilian Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation. 1 May 2024. Archived from the original on 6 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  36. ^ "CBF adia jogos de Grêmio, Inter e Juventude por situação de emergência após chuvas". ge (in Brazilian Portuguese). Grupo Globo. 2 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  37. ^ a b "Inter, Grêmio e Juventude pedem suspensão de jogos para a CBF pelos próximos 20 dias". ge (in Brazilian Portuguese). Grupo Globo. 6 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  38. ^ Rizzo, Marcel (7 May 2024). "Inter e Grêmio pedem para Brasileirão parar e pressionam CBF". CNN Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  39. ^ "Nota Oficial: Jogos no Rio Grande do Sul" (in Brazilian Portuguese). Brazilian Football Confederation. 7 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  40. ^ "CBF adia jogos de times gaúchos por 20 dias". ge (in Brazilian Portuguese). Grupo Globo. 7 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  41. ^ "CBF adia jogos de clubes gaúchos até 27 de maio; veja relação de partidas". CNN Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). 7 May 2024. Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  42. ^ "Postergación de partidos en la CONMEBOL Libertadores y CONMEBOL Sudamericana" (in Spanish). CONMEBOL. 7 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  43. ^ a b c "Rio Grande do Sul decreta estado de calamidade pública por conta das cheias". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). 2 May 2024. Archived from the original on 2 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  44. ^ "Decreto Nº 57.596, de 1º de Maio de 2024". Diário Oficial do Rio Grande do Sul (in Brazilian Portuguese). Rio Grande do Sul. 1 May 2024. Archived from the original on 2 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024. [Art. 2 This Decree comes into force on the date of its publication and will remain in force for a period of 180 days.]
  45. ^ "Governo destina R$ 117,7 milhões para a reconstrução de estradas estaduais". Portal do Estado do Rio Grande do Sul (in Brazilian Portuguese). Rio Grande do Sul. 6 May 2024. Archived from the original on 6 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  46. ^ a b Munhoz, Fábio (2 May 2024). "Chuvas no RS: "não vamos permitir que falte recursos para reparar os danos", diz Lula". CNN Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 3 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  47. ^ a b c Pereira Guimarães, Saulo (4 May 2024). "Força Nacional e 9 estados enviam agentes, aviões e cães para apoiar o RS". UOL (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 5 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  48. ^ Latif, Flavio (7 May 2024). "Flamengo, Palmeiras e SPFC oferecem estádios e CT a clubes gaúchos". UOL (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  49. ^ Sales, Ana Luisa; André, Henrique; Gimenez, Leonardo; Moreira, Mateus; Muratori, Matheus (7 May 2024). "Atlético-MG oferece Cidade do Galo a clubes gaúchos, afetados por chuvas no RS". CNN Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  50. ^ "Instituto Galo doa R$ 100 mil para vítimas das enchentes no RS". CNN Brasil (in Brazilian Portuguese). 7 May 2024. Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  51. ^ "Clubes brasileiros se solidarizam com situação do RS e reforçam pedidos por doações". ge (in Brazilian Portuguese). Grupo Globo. 3 May 2024. Archived from the original on 4 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  52. ^ "CBF anuncia doação de R$ 1 milhão para vítimas de enchentes no RS e campanha com astros da seleção". ge (in Brazilian Portuguese). Grupo Globo. 6 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  53. ^ "Defesa Civil de Rio Preto faz campanha para ajudar vítimas das chuvas no Rio Grande do Sul; veja como ajudar". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). 3 May 2024. Archived from the original on 3 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  54. ^ a b "Papa Francisco pede oração pela população do Rio Grande do Sul em razão das chuvas". O Globo (in Brazilian Portuguese). 5 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  55. ^ a b "Papa Francisco reza por vítimas de chuvas no Rio Grande do Sul". UOL (in Brazilian Portuguese). 5 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  56. ^ "Rio Grande do Sul, situazione "disperata" per le inondazioni. Solidarietà in campo". Vatican News (in Italian). 5 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  57. ^ a b "Governo antecipa IR e Bolsa Família e anuncia R$ 51 bi em benefícios ao RS". UOL (in Portuguese). 9 May 2024. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  58. ^ "Governo Lula anuncia pacote de R$ 51 bilhões em medidas para o RS". Veja (in Portuguese). 9 May 2024. Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 9 May 2024.
  59. ^ "Marinha envia nesta quarta maior navio de guerra da América Latina para ajudar população do Rio Grande do Sul". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). 7 May 2024. Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  60. ^ a b Wiltgen, Guilherme (7 May 2024). "Saiba o que o NAM 'Atlântico' vai levar para o RS". Defensa Aérea & Naval (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  61. ^ da Silva, Luiz Inácio Lula [@LulaOficial] (10 May 2024). "As fake news atrapalham o trabalho feito por todos no Rio Grande do Sul. Os esforços pela região não param. Continuaremos atuando em todas as frentes para garantir alimentos, segurança, equipamentos de saúde e medicamentos para quem precisa" (Tweet) (in Portuguese) – via Twitter.
  62. ^ a b c d Pitombo, João Pedro; Sousa, Aléxia (6 May 2024). "Voluntários abrem cozinhas, abrigam famílias e atuam em 'operação de guerra' no RS" [Volunteers open kitchens, shelter families and act in war operation in RS]. Folha de S. Paulo (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  63. ^ a b c Teixeira, Matheus (8 May 2024). "Jogadores, surfistas e voluntários se tornam braço do Estado nos resgates em enchentes no RS". Folha de S.Paulo (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on 11 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  64. ^ Souto, Mayara (6 May 2024). "Voluntários mobilizam ações de resgate para salvar vítimas de enchentes" [Volunteers mobilize rescue efforts to save flood victims]. Correio Braziliense (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  65. ^ a b "Voluntários acolhem pets resgatados de enchentes no RS: 'Chegam muito nervosos'" [Volunteers welcome pets rescued from floods in RS: 'They arrive very nervous']. g1 (g1.globo.com) (in Portuguese). 8 May 2024. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 11 May 2024.
  66. ^ Baeta, Juliana (9 May 2024). "BH volunteers rescue animals in Rio Grande do Sul; see ways to help". Diário do Comércio (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on 12 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  67. ^ "Barcos de voluntários fazem a diferença nos resgates na cidade de Canoas" [Volunteer boats make a difference in rescues in the city of Canoas]. Prefeitura de Canaos (in Portuguese). 5 May 2024. Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  68. ^ a b c Rocha, Isabel (9 May 2024). "Platform created by volunteers from Rio Grande do Sul has already rescued 12,000 people". Exame (in Portuguese). Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  69. ^ Parreiras, Mateus (5 May 2024). "Helicópteros particulares de todo Brasil voam em socorro às vítimas do RS" [Private helicopters from all over Brazil fly to help victims in RS]. Estado de Minas. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  70. ^ Sa Pessoa, Gabriela (18 May 2024). "In Brazil's flooded south, a secret mission to recover thousands of guns from an airport". Associated Press. Retrieved 18 May 2024.
  71. ^ a b Matoso, Filipe; Mazui, Guilherme (5 May 2024). "Aeronaves, drones e lanchas: Uruguai acerta envio de ajuda ao RS". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 6 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  72. ^ Pires, Thalita, ed. (8 May 2024). "Venezuela, Cuba, and Bolivia show solidarity with Brazil over floods in the state of Rio Grande do Sul". Brasil de Fato. Translated by Ana Paula Rocha. Archived from the original on 9 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.
  73. ^ Della Coletta, Ricardo (7 May 2024). "RS pede ajuda, Uruguai oferece lanchas, avião e drones, mas governo Lula dispensa". Folha de São Paulo (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 7 May 2024. Retrieved 7 May 2024.
  74. ^ "Uruguai oferece avião, drones e lanchas, mas governo Lula recusa ajuda". O Tempo (in Brazilian Portuguese). 7 May 2024. Archived from the original on 8 May 2024. Retrieved 8 May 2024.
  75. ^ Gomes, Pedro Henrique; Matoso, Filipe (6 May 2024). "Argentina oferece aeronaves, equipes de saúde, policiais e mergulhadores para ajudar Rio Grande do Sul". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). Archived from the original on 6 May 2024. Retrieved 6 May 2024.
  76. ^ "Governo dos EUA diz que está em contato com autoridades do Rio Grande do Sul". G1 (in Brazilian Portuguese). 10 May 2024. Archived from the original on 10 May 2024. Retrieved 10 May 2024.

External links