1227

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1227 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1227
MCCXXVII
Ab urbe condita1980
Armenian calendar676
ԹՎ ՈՀԶ
Assyrian calendar5977
Balinese saka calendar1148–1149
Bengali calendar634
Berber calendar2177
English Regnal year11 Hen. 3 – 12 Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar1771
Burmese calendar589
Byzantine calendar6735–6736
Chinese calendar丙戌年 (Fire Dog)
3923 or 3863
    — to —
丁亥年 (Fire Pig)
3924 or 3864
Coptic calendar943–944
Discordian calendar2393
Ethiopian calendar1219–1220
Hebrew calendar4987–4988
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1283–1284
 - Shaka Samvat1148–1149
 - Kali Yuga4327–4328
Holocene calendar11227
Igbo calendar227–228
Iranian calendar605–606
Islamic calendar624–625
Japanese calendarKaroku 3 / Antei 1
(安貞元年)
Javanese calendar1135–1136
Julian calendar1227
MCCXXVII
Korean calendar3560
Minguo calendar685 before ROC
民前685年
Nanakshahi calendar−241
Thai solar calendar1769–1770
Tibetan calendar阳火狗年
(male Fire-Dog)
1353 or 972 or 200
    — to —
阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
1354 or 973 or 201

Year 1227 (MCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Mongol invasion of Western Xia (China
)

Events

By place

Europe

Mongol Empire

Levant

England

Asia

  • Siege of Yinchuan: Mongol forces eliminate the Western Xia (or Xi Xia) and execute Emperor Mo (or Li Xian). Genghis Khan dies during the siege under debated circumstances, but this is kept secret from the army until the siege's end. Yinchuan is pillaged and its entire population is slaughtered or sold into slavery. Genghis orders the imperial family to be executed, effectively ending the Tangut royal lineage.[8]
  • August 18 – Genghis Khan dies during the fall of Yinchuan after a 21-year reign. His exact cause of death remains a mystery, and is variously attributed to being killed in action against the Western Xia, illness, falling from his horse, or wounds sustained during hunting. Genghis is succeeded by his third son, Ögedei Khan, who becomes the "Great Khan" of the Mongol Empire.[9]

By topic

Cities and Towns

Religion

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol III: The Kingdom of Acre, p. 150. ISBN 978-0-241-29877-0.
  2. ^ Hardwicke, Mary Nickerson (1969). The Crusader States, 1192–1243, pp. 542–543. A History of the Crusades (Setton), Volume II.
  3. ^ Van Cleve, Thomas C. (1969). The Crusade of Frederick II, p. 447. A History of the Crusades (Setton), Volume II.
  4. ^ "Attack to Finland in 1226". Laurentian Codex (in Swedish). Archived from the original on September 27, 2007.
  5. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol III: The Kingdom of Acre, p. 209. ISBN 978-0-241-29877-0.
  6. ^ Gibb, H. A. R. (1969). The Ayyubids, pp. 700–702. A History of the Crusades (Setton), Volume II.
  7. ^ Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 79–81. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  8. ^ Mote, Frederick W. (1999). Imperial China: 900–1800, p. 256. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-01212-7.
  9. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol III: The Kingdom of Acre, pp. 208–209. ISBN 978-0-241-29877-0.
  10. ^ Tanahashi, Kazuaki, ed. (1997). Moon In a Dewdrop: Writings of Zen Master Dogen. New York: North Point Press. ISBN 0-86547-186-X.
  11. ^ Tanahashi, Kazuaki; Loori, Daido (eds.). The True Dharma Eye. Boston: Shambhala.
  12. ^ Steven Runciman (1952). A History of The Crusades. Vol III: The Kingdom of Acre, p. 150. ISBN 978-0-241-29877-0.