UEFA Euro 2024

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UEFA Euro 2024
Fußball-Europameisterschaft 2024
(in German)

United by Football.
Vereint im Herzen Europas.

(United in the heart of Europe.)
Tournament details
Host countryGermany
Dates14 June – 14 July
Teams24
Venue(s)10 (in 10 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Spain (4th title)
Runners-up England
Tournament statistics
Matches played51
Goals scored117 (2.29 per match)
Attendance2,681,288 (52,574 per match)
Top scorer(s)
  • Six players
(3 goals each)
Best player(s)Spain Rodri
Best young playerSpain Lamine Yamal
2020
2028

The 2024 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2024 (stylised as UEFA EURO 2024) or simply Euro 2024, was the 17th UEFA European Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the European men's national teams of their member associations. Germany hosted the tournament, which took place from 14 June to 14 July 2024. The tournament involved 24 teams, with Georgia making their European Championship debut.

It was the third time that European Championship matches were played on German territory, and the second time in reunified Germany, as West Germany hosted the 1988 tournament, and four matches of the multi-national Euro 2020 were played in Munich. It was the first time the competition was held in what was formerly East Germany, with Leipzig as a host city, as well as the first major tournament since the 2006 FIFA World Cup that Germany served as a solo host nation.[1][2] The tournament returned to its usual four-year cycle after the 2020 edition was postponed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Italy were the defending champions, having won the 2020 final against England on penalties,[3] but were eliminated in the round of 16 by Switzerland.[4] Host nation Germany were eliminated by Spain in the quarter-finals; Spain went on to win the tournament for a record fourth time after defeating England 2–1 in the final.[5]

Host selection

The Trophy

On 8 March 2017, UEFA announced that two countries, Germany and Turkey, had announced their intentions to host the tournament before the deadline of 3 March 2017.[6][7]

The host was chosen by the UEFA Executive Committee in a confidential ballot,[8][9] needing only a simple majority of votes to win. If the votes were equal, the final decision rested with UEFA president Aleksander Čeferin.[10][11] Out of the 20 members on the UEFA Executive Committee, Reinhard Grindel (Germany) and Servet Yardımcı (Turkey) could not vote because they were ineligible. Lars-Christer Olsson (Sweden) was also absent due to illness. In total, 17 members were able to vote.[12][13]

The host was selected on 27 September 2018 in Nyon, Switzerland.[2][12][14][15] Germany initially planned to fully host Euro 2020, although had not announced any firm interest by May 2012.[16]

Voting results
Country Votes
 Germany 12
 Turkey 4
Abstention 1
Total 17

Venues

Germany had a wide choice of stadiums that satisfied UEFA's minimum capacity requirement of 30,000 seats for European Championship matches.[17]

Of the ten venues selected for Euro 2024, nine were used for the 2006 FIFA World Cup: Berlin, Dortmund, Munich, Cologne, Stuttgart, Hamburg, Leipzig, Frankfurt, and Gelsenkirchen.[18][19] Düsseldorf, which was not used in 2006 but had previously been used for the 1974 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 1988, served as the tenth venue; conversely, Hanover, Nuremberg and Kaiserslautern, host cities in 2006 (in addition to 1974 and 1988 in Hanover's case), were not used for this championship. Munich, the site of the first game of UEFA Euro 2024, was also a host city at the multi-national UEFA Euro 2020 tournament, hosting four matches (three involving Germany) in front of a greatly reduced number of spectators due to COVID-19 restrictions.[20]

Various other stadiums, such as those in Bremen and Mönchengladbach, were not selected.[21] The area with the highest number of venues at UEFA Euro 2024 was the Rhine-Ruhr metropolitan region in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, with four of the ten host cities (Dortmund, Düsseldorf, Gelsenkirchen and Cologne).[22]

The names presented below are those awarded by UEFA for each stadium during the tournament. The commercial name of each of them (if any) is shown in parentheses.

Berlin Munich Dortmund Stuttgart
Olympiastadion Munich Football Arena
(Allianz Arena)
BVB Stadion Dortmund
(Signal Iduna Park)
Stuttgart Arena
(MHPArena)
Capacity: 71,000[23] Capacity: 66,000[24] Capacity: 62,000[25] Capacity: 51,000[26]
Gelsenkirchen
Arena AufSchalke
(Veltins-Arena)
Capacity: 50,000[27]
Hamburg
Volksparkstadion
Capacity: 49,000[28]
Düsseldorf Frankfurt Cologne Leipzig
Düsseldorf Arena
(Merkur Spiel-Arena)
Frankfurt Arena
(Deutsche Bank Park)
Cologne Stadium
(RheinEnergieStadion)
Leipzig Stadium
(Red Bull Arena)
Capacity: 47,000[29] Capacity: 47,000[30] Capacity: 43,000[31] Capacity: 40,000[32]

Team base camps

Each team chose a "team base camp" for its stay between the matches. The teams trained and resided in these locations throughout the tournament, travelling to games staged away from their bases. The "team base camp" needed to be in Germany.[33]

Team Base camp Training ground
 Albania Kamen[34] SportCentrum Kaiserau
 Austria Berlin[35] Mommsenstadion
 Belgium Ludwigsburg[36] Wasenstadion, SGV Freiberg am Neckar
 Croatia Neuruppin[37] Volksparkstadion [de], MSV Neuruppin
 Czech Republic Hamburg[38] Edmund-Plambeck-Stadion, FC Eintracht Norderstedt 03
 Denmark Freudenstadt[39] Hermann-Saam-Stadion
 England Blankenhain[40] Golfresort Weimarer Land
 France Bad Lippspringe[41] Home Deluxe Arena, SC Paderborn 07
 Georgia Velbert[42] Stadion Velbert, SSVg Velbert
 Germany Herzogenaurach[43] Adidas Campus/HomeGround
 Hungary Weiler-Simmerberg[44] Tannenhof Resort, Sport & Spa
 Italy Iserlohn[45] Hemberg-Stadion
 Netherlands Wolfsburg[46] AOK Stadion, VfL Wolfsburg (women)
 Poland Hanover[47] Eilenriedestadion
 Portugal Harsewinkel[48] Hotel-Residence Klosterpforte Marienfeld / Sports grounds
 Romania Würzburg[49] Akon Arena, FC Würzburger Kickers
 Scotland Garmisch-Partenkirchen[50] Stadion am Gröben
 Serbia Augsburg[51] Rosenaustadion, FC Augsburg (Women)
 Slovakia Mainz[52] Bruchwegstadion, 1. FSV Mainz 05 (Women)
 Slovenia Wuppertal[53] Stadion am Zoo, Wuppertaler SV
 Spain Donaueschingen[54] Der Öschberghof
  Switzerland Stuttgart[55] Gazi-Stadion auf der Waldau, Stuttgarter Kickers
 Turkey Barsinghausen[56] Sporthotel Fuchsbachtal [de]
 Ukraine Wiesbaden Stadion am Halberg

Ticketing

Tickets for the venues were sold directly by UEFA via its website, or distributed by the football associations of the 24 finalists. Ticket sales started on 3 October 2023. More than 80% of 2.7 million tickets for the 51 tournament matches were available for the fans of the participating teams and the general public.[57] Fans of each participating team allocated 10,000 tickets for group stage matches, 6,000 tickets for the round of 16 and quarter-finals, 7,000 for the semi-finals, and 10,000 for the final match. Over 50 million applications from 206 countries were received. Besides fans of Germany, the most tickets were requested by fans supporting Turkey, Hungary, England, Albania and Croatia.[58] Prices ranged from €30 (for a seat behind the goal at a group match) to €1000 (for a seat in the main stand at the final).[59]

Qualification

  Team qualified for UEFA Euro 2024
  Team failed to qualify
  Team was banned from entering the competition
  Not a member of UEFA

As hosts, Germany qualified for the tournament automatically. The 23 remaining spots were determined by a qualifying tournament; 20 spots were decided by the direct qualification of the winners and runners-up of the 10 qualifying groups, with the remaining three spots decided by play-offs.[60] Places in the play-offs were given to the teams that performed the best in the 2022–23 UEFA Nations League who did not already qualify via the main qualifying tournament.[61] The draw for the UEFA Euro 2024 qualifying group stage was held on 9 October 2022 at the Festhalle in Frankfurt.[62][63] The qualifying group stage took place from March to November 2023, while the three play-offs were held in March 2024.[64]

Qualified teams

Of the 24 teams that qualified for the tournament, 19 had participated in the previous edition. These include the defending champions Italy and runners-up England, as well as 2022 World Cup runners-up France and bronze medalist Croatia. Portugal was the only team to qualify with a flawless record, whilst France, England, Belgium, Hungary, and Romania also qualified without a loss.[65]

Albania and Romania returned after missing out on Euro 2020, the former qualifying for only their second major tournament. Serbia and Slovenia both returned for the first time since Euro 2000, with Serbia qualifying for the first time since Serbia and Montenegro became separate nations, and Slovenia qualifying for their fourth major tournament as an independent nation.[66][67] Georgia beat Greece on penalties in the play-offs to qualify for their first-ever tournament since gaining independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, also becoming the only debutants for this edition and ensuring every final tournament since the inaugural Euro 1960 saw one new team make their debut.[68]

Notable absentees include Sweden, Russia, and Wales. Sweden failed to reach the finals for the first time since Euro 1996 and also failed to qualify for their second major tournament in a row, having missed out on the 2022 World Cup. Russia, who were regulars at finals since Euro 2000, were barred from the qualifiers altogether in the aftermath of the country's invasion of Ukraine, the first time a national team had been banned from the competition since FR Yugoslavia in 1992. Wales, who reached the knockout stages at the previous two editions, including the semi-finals at Euro 2016, lost to Poland on penalties in the play-offs. Having made their debut at the previous edition, both North Macedonia and Finland failed to qualify for this edition.

Team Qualified as Qualified on Previous appearances in tournament[A]
 Germany[B] Host 27 September 2018 13 (1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020)
 Belgium Group F winner 13 October 2023 6 (1972, 1980, 1984, 2000, 2016, 2020)
 France Group B winner 13 October 2023 10 (1960, 1984, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020)
 Portugal Group J winner 13 October 2023 8 (1984, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020)
 Scotland Group A runner-up 15 October 2023 3 (1992, 1996, 2020)
 Spain Group A winner 15 October 2023 11 (1964, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020)
 Turkey Group D winner 15 October 2023 5 (1996, 2000, 2008, 2016, 2020)
 Austria Group F runner-up 16 October 2023 3 (2008, 2016, 2020)
 England Group C winner 17 October 2023 10 (1968, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012, 2016, 2020)
 Hungary Group G winner 16 November 2023 4 (1964, 1972, 2016, 2020)
 Slovakia[C] Group J runner-up 16 November 2023 5 (1960, 1976, 1980, 2016, 2020)
 Albania Group E winner 17 November 2023 1 (2016)
 Denmark Group H winner 17 November 2023 9 (1964, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2012, 2020)
 Netherlands Group B runner-up 18 November 2023 10 (1976, 1980, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2020)
 Romania Group I winner 18 November 2023 5 (1984, 1996, 2000, 2008, 2016)
  Switzerland Group I runner-up 18 November 2023 5 (1996, 2004, 2008, 2016, 2020)
 Serbia[D] Group G runner-up 19 November 2023 5 (1960, 1968, 1976, 1984, 2000)[E]
 Czech Republic[C] Group E runner-up 20 November 2023 10 (1960, 1976, 1980, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020)
 Italy Group C runner-up 20 November 2023 10 (1968, 1980, 1988, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020)
 Slovenia Group H runner-up 20 November 2023 1 (2000)
 Croatia Group D runner-up 21 November 2023 6 (1996, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2016, 2020)
 Georgia Play-off Path C winner 26 March 2024 0 (debut)
 Ukraine Play-off Path B winner 26 March 2024 3 (2012, 2016, 2020)
 Poland Play-off Path A winner 26 March 2024 4 (2008, 2012, 2016, 2020)
  1. ^ Bold indicates champion for that year. Italic indicates host for that year.
  2. ^ From 1972 to 1988, Germany competed as West Germany.
  3. ^ a b From 1960 to 1980, both Slovakia and the Czech Republic competed as Czechoslovakia.[69][70][71][72]
  4. ^ From 1960 to 1984, Serbia competed as Yugoslavia, and in 2000 as FR Yugoslavia.
  5. ^ FR Yugoslavia were initially to appear in 1992 (after qualifying as Yugoslavia), but were replaced after being banned by the United Nations from all international sport.

Disqualification of Russia

At a meeting of the UEFA Executive Committee in Hvar, Croatia, on 20 September 2022, it was confirmed that Russia would be excluded from qualifying for Euro 2024, reaffirming the suspension of all Russian teams following the country's invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 and making this the first European Championship finals Russia would miss since 2000.[73][74][75][76]

Final draw

The final tournament draw took place on 2 December 2023, 18:00 CET, at the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg.[77] The teams were seeded in accordance with the overall European Qualifiers rankings. Hosts Germany were automatically seeded into pot 1, and they were placed in position A1. The three play-off winners were not known at the time of the draw, and the teams participating in those play-offs, scheduled to be held in March 2024, were placed into pot 4 for the draw.[78][79][80][81] The draw was disrupted by various sexual noises whilst it was taking place, as the result of a prankster.[82][83]

  • Pot 1: Germany (Host), group winners ranked 1–5
  • Pot 2: Group winners ranked 6–10, group runner-up ranked 1 (6–11 overall)
  • Pot 3: Group runners-up ranked 2–7 (12–17 overall)
  • Pot 4: Group runners-up ranked 8–10 (18–20 overall), play-off winners A–C (identity unknown at the time of the draw)

Seeding

Pot 1
Team Rank
 Germany (hosts)
 Portugal 1
 France 2
 Spain 3
 Belgium 4
 England 5
Pot 2
Team Rank
 Hungary 6
 Turkey 7
 Romania 8
 Denmark 9
 Albania 10
 Austria 11
Pot 3
Team Rank
 Netherlands 12
 Scotland 13
 Croatia 14
 Slovenia 15
 Slovakia 16
 Czech Republic 17
Pot 4[a]
Team Rank
 Italy 18
 Serbia 19
  Switzerland 20
Play-off winners A
Play-off winners B
Play-off winners C
  1. ^ Identity of the three play-off winners was unknown at the time of the draw.

Draw

Group A
Pos Team
A1  Germany
A2  Scotland
A3  Hungary
A4   Switzerland
Group B
Pos Team
B1  Spain
B2  Croatia
B3  Italy
B4  Albania
Group C
Pos Team
C1  Slovenia
C2  Denmark
C3  Serbia
C4  England
Group D
Pos Team
D1  Poland[a]
D2  Netherlands
D3  Austria
D4  France
Group E
Pos Team
E1  Belgium
E2  Slovakia
E3  Romania
E4  Ukraine[a]
Group F
Pos Team
F1  Turkey
F2  Georgia[a]
F3  Portugal
F4  Czech Republic
  1. ^ a b c Identity of the three play-off winners was unknown at the time of the draw.

Squads

The maximum squad size of the teams was increased from the original quota of 23 to 26 players. Teams had to provide the list containing a minimum of 23 players and a maximum of 26 by the deadline of 7 June.[84]

Match officials

In April 2024, 19 refereeing teams were selected to take charge of the 51 matches at the tournament, including an Argentine team selected as part of a co-operation agreement between the UEFA and CONMEBOL confederations.[85][86]

Refereeing teams
Country Referee Assistant referees Matches assigned
 Argentina Facundo Tello Gabriel Chade [de]
Ezequiel Brailovsky [es]
Turkey–Georgia (Group F)
Scotland–Hungary (Group A)
 England Michael Oliver Stuart Burt [de]
Dan Cook [de]
Spain–Croatia (Group B)
Slovakia–Ukraine (Group E)
Germany–Denmark (Round of 16)
Portugal–France (Quarter-finals)
Anthony Taylor Gary Beswick [de]
Adam Nunn [de]
Netherlands–France (Group D)
Ukraine–Belgium (Group E)
Spain–Germany (Quarter-finals)
 France François Letexier Cyril Mugnier [de]
Mehdi Rahmouni [de]
Croatia–Albania (Group B)
Denmark–Serbia (Group C)
Spain–Georgia (Round of 16)
Spain–England (Final)
Clément Turpin Nicolas Danos [de]
Benjamin Pagès [de]
Germany–Scotland (Group A)
England–Slovenia (Group C)
Netherlands–Turkey (Quarter-finals)
 Germany Daniel Siebert Jan Seidel
Rafael Foltyn
Georgia–Czech Republic (Group F)
Slovakia–Romania (Group E)
Felix Zwayer Stefan Lupp [de]
Marco Achmüller [de]
Italy–Albania (Group B)
Turkey–Portugal (Group F)
Romania–Netherlands (Round of 16)
Netherlands–England (Semi-finals)
 Italy Marco Guida Filippo Meli [it]
Giorgio Peretti [de]
Portugal–Czech Republic (Group F)
France–Poland (Group D)
Daniele Orsato Ciro Carbone [de]
Alessandro Giallatini [de]
Serbia–England (Group C)
Switzerland–Germany (Group A)
Portugal–Slovenia (Round of 16)
England–Switzerland (Quarter-finals)
 Netherlands Danny Makkelie Hessel Steegstra [de]
Jan de Vries [simple]
Germany–Hungary (Group A)
Croatia–Italy (Group B)
 Poland Szymon Marciniak Tomasz Listkiewicz [de]
Adam Kupsik [de]
Belgium–Romania (Group E)
Switzerland–Italy (Round of 16)
 Portugal Artur Soares Dias Paulo Soares [de]
Pedro Ribeiro [de]
Poland–Netherlands (Group D)
Denmark–England (Group C)
Austria–Turkey (Round of 16)
 Romania István Kovács Vasile Marinescu [de]
Mihai Ovidiu Artene [de]
Slovenia–Serbia (Group C)
Czech Republic–Turkey (Group F)
 Slovakia Ivan Kružliak Branislav Hancko [de]
Jan Pozor [de]
Scotland–Switzerland (Group A)
Netherlands–Austria (Group D)
 Slovenia Slavko Vinčić Tomaž Klančnik [de]
Andraž Kovačič [de]
Hungary–Switzerland (Group A)
Spain–Italy (Group B)
Spain–France (Semi-finals)
 Spain Jesús Gil Manzano Diego Barbero Sevilla [de]
Ángel Nevado Rodríguez [es]
Austria–France (Group D)
 Sweden Glenn Nyberg Mahbod Beigi [de]
Andreas Söderkvist [de]
Romania–Ukraine (Group E)
Albania–Spain (Group B)
France–Belgium (Round of 16)
 Switzerland Sandro Schärer Stéphane de Almeida [de]
Bekim Zogaj [de]
Slovenia–Denmark (Group C)
Georgia–Portugal (Group F)
 Turkey Halil Umut Meler Mustafa Emre Eyisoy [de]
Kerem Ersoy [de]
Belgium–Slovakia (Group E)
Poland–Austria (Group D)
England–Slovakia (Round of 16)

In addition, UEFA announced twenty video match officials and twelve support match officials (who would act as fourth official or reserve assistant referee).[86]

Video match officials
Country Referee(s)
 England Stuart Attwell
David Coote
 France Jérôme Brisard
Willy Delajod
 Germany Bastian Dankert
Christian Dingert
Marco Fritz
 Italy Massimiliano Irrati
Paolo Valeri
 Netherlands Rob Dieperink [nl]
Pol van Boekel
 Poland Bartosz Frankowski
Tomasz Kwiatkowski [pl]
 Portugal Tiago Martins
 Romania Cătălin Popa [it]
 Slovenia Nejc Kajtazovič [nl]
 Spain Alejandro Hernández Hernández
Juan Martínez Munuera
 Switzerland Fedayi San [it]
 Turkey Alper Ulusoy [tr]
Support match officials
Country Fourth official Reserve assistant referee
 Bosnia and Herzegovina Irfan Peljto Senad Ibrišimbegović [de]
 Lithuania Donatas Rumšas [nl] Aleksandr Radiuš [de]
 Netherlands Serdar Gözübüyük Johan Balder [de]
 Norway Espen Eskås Jan Erik Engan [de]
 Slovenia Rade Obrenović [it] Jure Praprotnik [de]
 Ukraine Mykola Balakin [it] Oleksandr Berkut [de]

Group stage

Result of teams participating in UEFA Euro 2024

UEFA announced the tournament schedule on 10 May 2022, which included kick-off times only for the opening match, semi-finals, and final.[87][88] The kick-off times for all other matches were announced on 2 December 2023 following the draw.[89][90]

Group winners, runners-up and the best four third-placed teams advanced to the round of 16.

All times are local, CEST (UTC+2).

Tiebreakers

If two or more teams were equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following tie-breaking criteria were applied:[78]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the matches played between the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the matches played between the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the matches played between the teams in question;
  4. If, after having applied criteria 1 to 3, teams still have an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 3 are reapplied exclusively to the matches between the teams who are still level to determine their final rankings.[a] If this procedure does not lead to a decision, criteria 5 to 9 will apply;
  5. Superior goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Higher number of goals scored in all group matches;
  7. If on the last round of the group stage, two teams who are facing each other are tied in points, goal difference and goals scored then they drew their match, their ranking is determined by a penalty shoot-out. (This criterion is not used if more than two teams had the same number of points.);
  8. Lower disciplinary points total in all group matches (1 point for a single yellow card, 3 points for a red card regardless whether it was a direct red card or two yellow cards, 4 points for a yellow card followed by a direct red card);
  9. Higher position in the European Qualifiers overall ranking, or drawing of lots if hosts Germany had been involved in the tiebreaker.

Notes

  1. ^ If there is a three-way tie on points, the application of the first three criteria may only break the tie for one of the teams, leaving the other two teams still tied. In this case, the tiebreaking procedure is resumed, from the beginning, for the two teams that are still tied.

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Germany (H) 3 2 1 0 8 2 +6 7 Advance to knockout stage
2   Switzerland 3 1 2 0 5 3 +2 5
3  Hungary 3 1 0 2 2 5 −3 3
4  Scotland 3 0 1 2 2 7 −5 1
Source: UEFA
(H) Hosts
Germany 5–1 Scotland
Report
Attendance: 65,052[91]
Hungary 1–3  Switzerland
Report

Germany 2–0 Hungary
Report
Attendance: 54,000[93]
Scotland 1–1  Switzerland
Report

Switzerland 1–1 Germany
Report
Scotland 0–1 Hungary
Report
Attendance: 54,000[96]

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Spain 3 3 0 0 5 0 +5 9 Advance to knockout stage
2  Italy 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4
3  Croatia 3 0 2 1 3 6 −3 2
4  Albania 3 0 1 2 3 5 −2 1
Source: UEFA
Spain 3–0 Croatia
Report
Attendance: 68,844[97]
Italy 2–1 Albania
Report
Attendance: 60,512[98]

Croatia 2–2 Albania
Report
Spain 1–0 Italy
Report

Albania 0–1 Spain
Report
Croatia 1–1 Italy
Report

Group C

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  England 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1 5 Advance to knockout stage
2  Denmark 3 0 3 0 2 2 0 3[a]
3  Slovenia 3 0 3 0 2 2 0 3[a]
4  Serbia 3 0 2 1 1 2 −1 2
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Tied on head-to-head result (Slovenia 1–1 Denmark), overall goal difference and overall goals scored. Disciplinary points: Denmark −6, Slovenia −7.[103][104]
Slovenia 1–1 Denmark
Report
Attendance: 54,000[105]
Serbia 0–1 England
Report

Slovenia 1–1 Serbia
Report
Attendance: 63,028[107]
Denmark 1–1 England
Report

England 0–0 Slovenia
Report
Denmark 0–0 Serbia
Report
Attendance: 64,288[110]

Group D

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Austria 3 2 0 1 6 4 +2 6 Advance to knockout stage
2  France 3 1 2 0 2 1 +1 5
3  Netherlands 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4
4  Poland 3 0 1 2 3 6 −3 1
Source: UEFA
Poland 1–2 Netherlands
Report
Austria 0–1 France
Report

Poland 1–3 Austria
Report
Attendance: 69,455[113]
Netherlands 0–0 France
Report
Attendance: 38,531[114]

Netherlands 2–3 Austria
Report
Attendance: 68,363[115]
France 1–1 Poland
Report
Attendance: 59,728[116]
Referee: Marco Guida (Italy)

Group E

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Romania 3 1 1 1 4 3 +1 4 Advance to knockout stage
2  Belgium 3 1 1 1 2 1 +1 4
3  Slovakia 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4
4  Ukraine 3 1 1 1 2 4 −2 4
Source: UEFA
Romania 3–0 Ukraine
Report
Attendance: 61,591[117]
Referee: Glenn Nyberg (Sweden)
Belgium 0–1 Slovakia
Report

Slovakia 1–2 Ukraine
Report
Belgium 2–0 Romania
Report

Slovakia 1–1 Romania
Report
Ukraine 0–0 Belgium
Report
Attendance: 54,000[122]

Group F

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Portugal 3 2 0 1 5 3 +2 6[a] Advance to knockout stage
2  Turkey 3 2 0 1 5 5 0 6[a]
3  Georgia 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4
4  Czech Republic 3 0 1 2 3 5 −2 1
Source: UEFA
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Head-to-head result: Turkey 0–3 Portugal.
Turkey 3–1 Georgia
Report
Portugal 2–1 Czech Republic
Report
Attendance: 38,421[124]
Referee: Marco Guida (Italy)

Georgia 1–1 Czech Republic
Report
Turkey 0–3 Portugal
Report

Georgia 2–0 Portugal
Report
Czech Republic 1–2 Turkey
Report

Ranking of third-placed teams

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 D  Netherlands 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4[a] Advance to knockout stage
2 F  Georgia 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4[a]
3 E  Slovakia 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4
4 C  Slovenia 3 0 3 0 2 2 0 3
5 A  Hungary 3 1 0 2 2 5 −3 3
6 B  Croatia 3 0 2 1 3 6 −3 2
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: 1) Points; 2) Goal difference; 3) Goals scored; 4) Wins; 5) Lower disciplinary points total; 6) European Qualifiers overall ranking (or drawing of lots, if hosts Germany had been involved in the tiebreaker).[78]
Notes:
  1. ^ a b Disciplinary points: Netherlands −2, Georgia −6.[104]

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, if a match was level at the end of normal playing time, extra time was played (two periods of 15 minutes each). If still tied after extra time, the match was decided by a penalty shoot-out.[78]

As with every tournament since UEFA Euro 1984, there was no third place play-off.

All times listed are Central European Summer Time (UTC+2)

Bracket

 
Round of 16Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
              
 
30 June – Cologne
 
 
 Spain4
 
5 July – Stuttgart
 
 Georgia1
 
 Spain (a.e.t.)2
 
29 June – Dortmund
 
 Germany1
 
 Germany2
 
9 July – Munich
 
 Denmark0
 
 Spain2
 
1 July – Frankfurt
 
 France1
 
 Portugal (p)0 (3)
 
5 July – Hamburg
 
 Slovenia0 (0)
 
 Portugal0 (3)
 
1 July – Düsseldorf
 
 France (p)0 (5)
 
 France1
 
14 July – Berlin
 
 Belgium0
 
 Spain2
 
2 July – Munich
 
 England1
 
 Romania0
 
6 July – Berlin
 
 Netherlands3
 
 Netherlands2
 
2 July – Leipzig
 
 Turkey1
 
 Austria1
 
10 July – Dortmund
 
 Turkey2
 
 Netherlands1
 
30 June – Gelsenkirchen
 
 England2
 
 England (a.e.t.)2
 
6 July – Düsseldorf
 
 Slovakia1
 
 England (p)1 (5)
 
29 June – Berlin
 
  Switzerland1 (3)
 
  Switzerland2
 
 
 Italy0
 

Round of 16

Switzerland 2–0 Italy
Report
Attendance: 68,172[129]

Germany 2–0 Denmark
Report

England 2–1 (a.e.t.) Slovakia
Report Schranz 25'

Spain 4–1 Georgia
Report

France 1–0 Belgium
Report


Romania 0–3 Netherlands
Report
Attendance: 65,012[135]

Austria 1–2 Turkey
Report

Quarter-finals

Spain 2–1 (a.e.t.) Germany
Report
Attendance: 54,000[137]



Netherlands 2–1 Turkey
Report
Attendance: 70,091[140]

Semi-finals

Spain 2–1 France
Report
Attendance: 62,042[141]

Netherlands 1–2 England
Report

Final

Spain 2–1 England
Report

Statistics

Goalscorers

There were 117 goals scored in 51 matches, for an average of 2.29 goals per match.

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Source: UEFA[144]

Awards

The Team of the Tournament, chosen by UEFA

UEFA Team of the Tournament

UEFA's technical observer team was given the objective of naming a team of the best eleven players from the tournament. Six players from the winning Spanish squad were named in the team.[145]

Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Forwards
France Mike Maignan England Kyle Walker
Switzerland Manuel Akanji
France William Saliba
Spain Marc Cucurella
Spain Dani Olmo
Spain Rodri
Spain Fabián Ruiz
Spain Lamine Yamal
Germany Jamal Musiala
Spain Nico Williams

Player of the Tournament

The Player of the Tournament award was given to Rodri, who was chosen by UEFA's technical observers.[146]

Young Player of the Tournament

The Young Player of the Tournament award, open to players born on or after 1 January 2002, was given to Lamine Yamal, as chosen by UEFA's technical observers.[147]

Top Scorer

Unlike in previous editions, the "Alipay Top Scorer" award, given to the top scorer of the tournament, was allowed to be shared among multiple players, whereas previous installments used assists and minutes played as tiebreakers. The award was thus given to each of the six players who scored three goals in the tournament: Cody Gakpo, Harry Kane, Georges Mikautadze, Jamal Musiala, Dani Olmo, and Ivan Schranz.[148]

(3 goals each)

Goal of the Tournament

The Goal of the Tournament was decided by a panel of UEFA technical observers. On 16 July 2024, UEFA announced that Spanish winger Lamine Yamal's semi-final goal against France had been chosen as the best goal of the tournament.[149]

Fans' Goal of the Tournament

The Fans' Goal of the Tournament was decided by online voting. A total 10 goals were in the shortlist, chosen by UEFA technical observers. On 20 July 2024, after an open vote on the official Euro 2024 website, UEFA announced that Turkish defender Mert Müldür's group stage goal against Georgia had been chosen as the fans' goal of the tournament.[150]

Discipline

A player was automatically suspended for the next match for the following offences:[78]

  • Receiving a red card (red card suspensions could be extended for serious offences)
  • Receiving two yellow cards in two different matches;[A] yellow cards expired after the completion of the quarter-finals (yellow card suspensions were not carried forward to any other future international matches)

The following players earned a suspension during the tournament:[151][104][152][153][154]

Player Offence(s) Suspension(s)
Georgia (country) Giorgi Loria Red card in qualifying vs Greece (26 March 2024) Group F vs Turkey (matchday 1; 18 June 2024)
Scotland Ryan Porteous Red card in Group A vs Germany (matchday 1; 14 June 2024) Group A vs Switzerland (matchday 2; 19 June 2024)
Group A vs Hungary (matchday 3; 23 June 2024)[155]
Albania Mirlind Daku[B] Nationalist chants following Group B vs Croatia (matchday 2; 19 June 2024)[157] Group B vs Spain (matchday 3; 24 June 2024)
Spain Rodri Yellow card in Group B vs Croatia (matchday 1; 15 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group B vs Italy (matchday 2; 20 June 2024)
Group B vs Albania (matchday 3; 24 June 2024)
Belgium Dodi Lukebakio Yellow card in Group E vs Slovakia (matchday 1; 17 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group E vs Romania (matchday 2; 22 June 2024)
Group E vs Ukraine (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Portugal Rafael Leão Yellow card in Group F vs Czech Republic (matchday 1; 18 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group F vs Turkey (matchday 2; 22 June 2024)
Group F vs Georgia (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Turkey Abdülkerim Bardakcı Yellow card in Group F vs Georgia (matchday 1; 18 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group F vs Portugal (matchday 2; 22 June 2024)
Group F vs Czech Republic (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Germany Jonathan Tah Yellow card in Group A vs Scotland (matchday 1; 14 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group A vs Switzerland (matchday 3; 23 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Denmark (29 June 2024)
Switzerland Silvan Widmer Yellow card in Group A vs Hungary (matchday 1; 15 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group A vs Germany (matchday 3; 23 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Italy (29 June 2024)
Italy Riccardo Calafiori Yellow card in Group B vs Albania (matchday 1; 15 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group B vs Croatia (matchday 3; 24 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Switzerland (29 June 2024)
Austria Patrick Wimmer Yellow card in Group D vs Poland (matchday 2; 21 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group D vs Netherlands (matchday 3; 25 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Turkey (2 July 2024)
Denmark Morten Hjulmand Yellow card in Group C vs Slovenia (matchday 1; 16 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group C vs Serbia (matchday 3; 25 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Germany (29 June 2024)
Slovenia Erik Janža Yellow card in Group C vs Serbia (matchday 2; 20 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group C vs England (matchday 3; 25 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Portugal (1 July 2024)
Romania Nicușor Bancu Yellow card in Group E vs Belgium (matchday 2; 22 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group E vs Slovakia (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Netherlands (2 July 2024)
Czech Republic Antonín Barák Yellow card Yellow-red card in Group F vs Turkey (matchday 3; 26 June 2024) Suspension to be served outside the tournament
Czech Republic Tomáš Chorý Red card in Group F vs Turkey (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Georgia (country) Anzor Mekvabishvili Yellow card in Group F vs Czech Republic (matchday 2; 22 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group F vs Portugal (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Spain (30 June 2024)
Turkey Samet Akaydin Yellow card in Group F vs Portugal (matchday 2; 22 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group F vs Czech Republic (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Round of 16 vs Austria (2 July 2024)
Turkey Hakan Çalhanoğlu Yellow card in Group F vs Georgia (matchday 1; 18 June 2024)
Yellow card in Group F vs Czech Republic (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
England Marc Guéhi Yellow card in Group C vs Slovenia (matchday 3; 25 June 2024)
Yellow card in Round of 16 vs Slovakia (30 June 2024)
Quarter-finals vs Switzerland (6 July 2024)
France Adrien Rabiot Yellow card in Group D vs Poland (matchday 3; 25 June 2024)
Yellow card in Round of 16 vs Belgium (1 July 2024)
Quarter-finals vs Portugal (5 July 2024)
Slovenia Matjaž Kek (manager) Red card in Round of 16 vs Portugal (1 July 2024) Suspension to be served outside the tournament
Turkey Orkun Kökçü Yellow card in Group F vs Czech Republic (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Yellow card in Round of 16 vs Austria (2 July 2024)
Quarter-finals vs Netherlands (6 July 2024)
Turkey İsmail Yüksek Yellow card in Group F vs Czech Republic (matchday 3; 26 June 2024)
Yellow card in Round of 16 vs Austria (2 July 2024)
Turkey Merih Demiral[C] Nationalist hand symbol in Round of 16 vs Austria (2 July 2024)[159]
Spain Dani Carvajal Yellow card Yellow-red card in Quarter-finals vs Germany (5 July 2024) Semi-finals vs France (9 July 2024)
Spain Robin Le Normand Yellow card in Group B vs Italy (matchday 2; 20 June 2024)
Yellow card in Quarter-finals vs Germany (5 July 2024)
Turkey Bertuğ Yıldırım Red card in Quarter-finals vs Netherlands (6 July 2024) Suspension to be served outside the tournament
  1. ^ As yellow cards are not carried forward to penalty shoot-outs, players may be shown two yellow cards in the same fixture without being sent off. However, this would result in a suspension for accumulating two yellow cards during the tournament.
  2. ^ Daku was handed a two-match ban,[156] with the second match of the suspension to be served outside the tournament.
  3. ^ Demiral was handed a two-match ban,[158] with the second match of the suspension to be served outside the tournament.

Prize money

The prize money was finalised on 2 December 2023. Each team received a participation fee of €9.25 million, with the winner able to earn a maximum of €28.25 million.[160]

Prize money
Rank (unoff.) Team € million
1  Spain 28.25
2  England 24.25
3  France 19.25
4  Netherlands 18.75
5  Germany 15.75
6  Portugal
 Turkey
  Switzerland
15.25
9  Austria 12.75
10  Romania
 Belgium
 Georgia
 Italy
 Slovakia
 Denmark
 Slovenia
12.25
17  Ukraine 10.75
18  Hungary
 Serbia
 Croatia
10.25
21  Albania
 Czech Republic
 Poland
 Scotland
9.75
Round achieved Amount Number of teams
Final tournament €9.25m 24
Group stage €1m for a win
€500,000 for a draw
24
Round of 16 €1.5m 16
Quarter-finals €2.5m 8
Semi-finals €4m 4
Runner-up €5m 1
Winner €8m 1

Records

  • After securing a record fourth title, Spain became the first European Championship winners to win all their group matches twice (having done so previously in 2008), with France (1984) and Italy (2021) the only other teams to have achieved this once. This statistic refers to the European Championship since 1980, with the inclusion of the group stage.[161]
  • Spain also became the first European team to win all seven matches at European championship without needing a penalty shoot-out.[162] France also won every match without needing a penalty shoot-out in 1984, albeit while playing only five matches.
  • Spain's 15 goals broke the record for most goals scored by a team at a single European Championship. The record was previously held by France, scoring 14 goals in 1984. Ten different players scored for Spain, another record.[161]
  • By taking charge of Germany's tournament opener against Scotland, Julian Nagelsmann became the youngest head coach to manage a match at the European Championship at the age of 36 years and 327 days, surpassing the previous record set in 2000 by Slovenia coach Srečko Katanec by six days.[161]
  • Lamine Yamal became the youngest player to play at a UEFA European Championship aged 16 years and 338 days old, after featuring for Spain in their opening match against Croatia. The previous youngest player was Poland's Kacper Kozłowski, aged 17 years and 246 days in 2021.[163]
  • With his goal in Spain's semi-final against France, Yamal then became the youngest goalscorer in the history of the European Championship, aged 16 years and 362 days. The previous youngest was Switzerland's Johan Vonlanthen, aged 18 years and 141 days in 2004, also against France.[164]
  • Yamal's appearance in the final, one day after his 17th birthday, also made him the youngest player to both appear in and also win a UEFA European Championship final.[165] Previously, the youngest player to both appear in and also win a UEFA European Championship final was Portugal's Renato Sanches, in 2016, aged 18 years and 328 days.
  • Nedim Bajrami set the record for fastest goal scored in European Championship history, scoring in Albania's opener against Italy after just 23 seconds. This shattered the previous record of 67 seconds, set by Russia's Dmitri Kirichenko in 2004. Kirichenko's goal was then pushed into third place following Merih Demiral's goal for Turkey against Austria in the round of 16, coming after only 58 seconds. The fourth-fastest goal was also recorded, when Youri Tielemans scored for Belgium against Romania after only 74 seconds.[166]
  • Portugal's Pepe became the oldest player to make an appearance at the European Championship, aged 41 years and 130 days in his side's quarter-final match against France. Hungary goalkeeper Gabor Király, the previous record holder, was aged 40 years and 86 days when he faced Belgium in the round of 16 in 2016. Before Pepe, the oldest outfield player was Lothar Matthäus, who won his 150th and final cap for Germany aged 39 years and 91 days in 2000.[167]
  • Cristiano Ronaldo extended his own record for the most tournaments featured in, appearing in his sixth European Championship.[168]
  • Luka Modrić became the oldest player to score a goal at the European Championship, aged 38 years and 289 days in Croatia's group stage match against Italy. The previous record was held by Austria's Ivica Vastić, who was 38 years and 257 days old when he scored against Poland in 2008.[169]
  • Kevin Csoboth set the record for the latest regulation time goal in tournament history, scoring for Hungary against Scotland in the 10th minute after the 90-minute mark.[170][171]
  • The final Group F game between Czech Republic and Turkey broke the record for the most number of cards shown in total in a single match. 19 cards (17 yellow and 2 red) were shown (Czech Republic receiving 7 of them and Turkey 12), surpassing the previous record of 10 shown in the Euro 2016 final between Portugal and France.[172]
  • Portuguese goalkeeper Diogo Costa made three saves in the round of 16 penalty shoot-out against Slovenia, breaking the European Championship record for most saves in one penalty shoot-out, while Slovenia became the first team in tournament history to miss all of their penalties.[173][174]

Marketing

Countdown clock for UEFA Euro 2024 in front of Düsseldorf City Hall

Branding

The official logo was unveiled on 5 October 2021, during a ceremony at the Olympiastadion in Berlin. The logo depicted the Henri Delaunay Trophy with 24 coloured slices around the trophy representing the 24 participating nations, and the ellipse reflected the shape of the Olympiastadion.[175] In addition, each of the ten host cities had their own unique logo, featuring the following local sights:[176]

The official slogan of the tournament was "United by Football. Vereint im Herzen Europas." The slogan was chosen to promote diversity and inclusion.[177]

Merchandise

In November 2023, it was announced that EA Sports had picked up the rights for the UEFA Euro 2024 video game, and that the Euro 2024 downloadable update would be coming to EA Sports FC 24, EA Sports FC Mobile, and EA Sports FC Online in the summer of 2024.[178] Released on 11 June, the update featured a full tournament mode, local and online friendlies, and a Euro-themed single player career mode, called "Lead Your Nation", each including all of the teams, players, and tournament venues.[179][180]

From Euro 2024, Fanatics would be controlling the e-commerce, event retail and licensing of UEFA National Team competitions until Euro 2028.[181]

Topps, also owned by Fanatics, was the official sticker and trading card partner of the tournament, marking the end of Panini's association with UEFA which began in 1976. Stickers were produced for all the Euro 2024 teams, including the teams that did not qualify for the qualifying play-offs. These stickers could be sold, collected or traded.[182]

Official song

In December 2023, Italian DJ group Meduza, American pop rock band OneRepublic and German singer Kim Petras were all announced as the official music artists of the tournament.[183] However, in March 2024, it was announced that Petras had withdrawn from production due to scheduling issues, and was replaced by German singer Leony.[184] The official song, "Fire", was released on 10 May 2024.[185] It was performed live by the three music artists at the tournament's closing ceremony before the final on 14 July 2024.[186]

Broadcasting rights

The International Broadcast Centre (IBC) was located at the halls of the Leipzig Trade Fair in Leipzig, Germany.[187]

Unlike the previous two tournaments, UEFA discontinued 4K ultra-high-definition broadcasts due to technical constraints, and amid lukewarm interest in the format among European broadcasters in comparison to high-dynamic-range (HDR) color.[188]

Sponsorship

UEFA used virtual advertising for the first time in the history of Euros, having three different types of sponsorship besides the Global sponsors, one pack for Germany, one for the United States and another for the Chinese market.[189]

Official global sponsors[190]

Official Germany national sponsors[189]

Symbols

Mascot

The official mascot "Albärt".

The official UEFA Euro 2024 mascot was unveiled on 20 June 2023 at the Germany vs Colombia international friendly in Gelsenkirchen.[209] The mascot was a teddy bear with shorts on.[210] A public vote was used to select the name of the mascot, with options being "Albärt", "Bärnardo", "Bärnheart" and "Herzi von Bär", all referencing the German word for bear (Bär).[211] Results were made public on 5 July, with the mascot's name announced to be "Albärt", getting 32% of the votes.[212]

Unofficially the event even has an animal oracle following in the footsteps of Paul the Octopus: Bubi the Elephant, who "predicted" Germany's opening round against Scotland with her initial kick through a makeshift goal.[213]

Match ball

Official replica-version of the match ball "Fussballliebe".

The official match ball of the tournament, "Fussballliebe", was unveiled by UEFA and Adidas on 15 November 2023.[214] Translated from the German as "football love", it featured black wing shapes with red, blue, orange and green edges and curves to showcase the qualified nations' vibrancy to the tournament, and the love that fans around the world give to football. Created with sustainable organic materials,[214] this was the first ball for a UEFA Euro to feature "Connected Ball Technology", where it contained internal electronic sensors, allowing detection of its movement for UEFA match officials to use to assist in decision-making.[215]

Controversies and incidents

Pitch invasions, thrown projectiles, and other interference

The Group F match between Turkey and Portugal was interrupted four times by pitch invaders trying to take a selfie with Cristiano Ronaldo. Two others invaded the pitch right after the final whistle. Additional pitch invasions happened during the game between Albania and Italy, one during the game between Romania and Ukraine, and one during the round of 16 game between Romania and the Netherlands. During another pitch invasion after the semi-final between Spain and France, a security guard chasing the invader accidentally slid into Spanish striker Álvaro Morata, who suffered an injury as a consequence.[216][217][218][219][220][221]

Several players and managers have complained about fans throwing reusable plastic cups on the pitch, on occasion hitting players, particularly when taking a corner kick.[222] Other objects have been thrown as well,[223] and Kevin De Bruyne had a laser pointer shone in his eye in one match.[224][225][226][227]

Barnabás Varga injury

During the second half of the Group A fixture between Scotland and Hungary, Hungarian striker Barnabás Varga was left unconscious after a collision with Scottish goalkeeper Angus Gunn, landing in a fencing response. It was later revealed that Varga had suffered from a concussion and sustained multiple fractured cheekbones.[228] Rapidly following the incident, medics made their way toward the scene and protective sheets were held around Varga. However, the stretcher bearers were seen walking toward the player, rather than running, prompting dismay from players, fans, and staff alike. Hungary captain Dominik Szoboszlai and fellow player Endre Botka proceeded to run with the stretcher in an attempt to speed up the process.[229] Following the injury, the captain expressed his frustration, stating that the medical staff did not react quick enough, with hopes that "everyone can save a few seconds and save a life." This was rebutted by UEFA, who claimed that the coordination between the on-site medical staff was "professional", with "no delay in the treatment of and assistance to the player."[230]

The match was resumed after 10 minutes, as Hungary went on to win by a score of 0–1 following a stoppage time goal from Kevin Csoboth, with Varga making a full recovery after undergoing surgery.[231]

Balkan incidents

During the group stage, several controversies came up due to the behaviour of various Balkan fans and players. Albania and Serbia were both fined €10,000 after their fans displayed irredentist symbols; Serbian fans displayed maps of Kosovo as being a part of Serbia while Albanian fans displayed maps of Greater Albania. Serbia threatened to quit the tournament if UEFA did not take action against Croatia and Albania after some of their fans chanted anti-Serbian slogans during the match, such as Ubij ubij ubij Srbina ("Kill kill kill the Serb"); an investigation was later launched into Croatia.[232] After the group stage game between Albania and Croatia, Mirlind Daku led the Albanian supporters in chanting anti-Macedonian and anti-Serbian slogans, and Albania was fined €47,250 and Daku was banned for two games. Kosovar journalist Arlind Sadiku was banned after making the crossed hands gesture towards Serbian fans during the Serbia and England game.[232]

Merih Demiral celebration

In the Austria vs Turkey match on 2 July 2024, Turkish player Merih Demiral celebrated his second goal of the match with a wolf salute. The gesture is seen as ultra-nationalist due to its connection with far-right extremist group Grey Wolves and is banned in Austria, as well as France.[233] The celebration was criticised by German interior minister Nancy Faeser, while Nationalist Movement Party president Devlet Bahçeli shared his support for the celebration.[234] Demiral also posted a photo on his Twitter account of him performing the celebration along with the caption of: "How happy is the one who says I am a Turk!". UEFA opened an investigation on Demiral the following day[235] before later handing him a two-match ban, meaning he would miss Turkey's quarter-final match against the Netherlands, as well as their first 2024–25 UEFA Nations League match as they were eliminated in the quarter-finals.[236] Ahead of Turkey's following match against the Netherlands, Turkish supporters were seen making the controversial hand gesture en masse while on their way to the stadium as well as inside the stadium.[237][238][239]

Spanish celebrations

Following Spain's victory in the final, videos showed some Spanish players celebrating with offensive chants towards Gibraltar, a British Overseas Territory.[240][241] The Gibraltar FA stated they would file a complaint with UEFA.[242]

See also

References

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