Thomas of Harqel

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Thomas of Harqel was a miaphysite bishop from the early 7th century. Educated in Greek at the monastery of Qenneshre, he became bishop of Mabbug in Syria. He was deposed as bishop by the anti-miaphysite metropolitan Domitian of Melitene before 602.[1] Along with Paul of Tella, he lived in the Coptic monastery of the Enaton near Alexandria, Egypt, as exiles. At the request of Athanasios I, they worked on a Syriac translation of the Greek Bible. Translation of the New Testament, known as the Harclensis was completed in 616.[2][3][4] At this time, 2 Peter, 2 John, 3 John, Jude and Revelation were added to the Syriac Bible. Until then they were excluded.

References

  1. ^ William H. P. Hatch, "The Subscription in the Chester Beatty Manuscript of the Harclean Gospels", The Harvard Theological Review 30, 3 (1937), p. 143. JSTOR 1507949
  2. ^ Bromiley, Geoffrey W. (1995). The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia: Q-Z. p. 976. ISBN 0-8028-3784-0. Printed editions of the Peshitta frequently contain these books in order to fill the gaps. D. Harklean Version. The Harklean version is connected with the labors of Thomas of Harqel. When thousands were fleeing Khosrou's invading armies, ...
  3. ^ Kiraz, George Anton (2002) [1996]. Comparative Edition of the Syriac Gospels: Aligning the Old Syriac Sinaiticus, Curetonianus, Peshitta and Harklean Versions (2nd ed.). Piscataway, New Jersey: Gorgias Press (Brill).
  4. ^ Kiraz, George Anton (2004) [1996]. Comparative Edition of the Syriac Gospels: Aligning the Old Syriac Sinaiticus, Curetonianus, Peshitta and Harklean Versions (3rd ed.). Piscataway, New Jersey: Gorgias Press (Brill).
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