Sian Brooke

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Sian Brooke
Born
Sian Elizabeth Phillips

1980 (age 41–42)
Other namesSiân Brooke
Years active2002–present
Height5 ft 6 in (168 cm)[1]
Children2

Sian Brooke (born Sian Elizabeth Phillips; born 1980)[2] is a British actress. Her television work includes Cape Wrath (2007), Sherlock (2017), Doctor Foster (2017), Good Omens (2019), Guilt (2019), and Trying (2020–).

Early life and education

Sian Elizabeth Phillips was born in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England in 1980 and is the youngest of three siblings. She took on a stage name to avoid confusion with fellow actress Siân Phillips, choosing Brooke after an English Civil War general Lord Brooke who was killed at Lichfield.[3] She is the daughter of a police officer and a teacher.[4] Her parents are Welsh.[5] Brooke's early education was at The Friary School in Lichfield.[4] She initially joined the Lichfield Youth Theatre at the age of 11 before becoming a member of the National Youth Theatre and subsequently training at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), from where she graduated in 2002.[4][6]

Career

Her acting debut was as Krista in television series Dinotopia in 2002.[1] Brooke's television credits include A Touch of Frost, Hotel Babylon, Foyle's War, and The Fixer. As a child, she was featured in Strangers in Utah with Adrian Dunbar and Phyllida Law. She also played the lead roles of Laura in All About George and Lori Marcuse in Cape Wrath.

Brooke has lent her voice to the radio dramas Murder on the Homefront, A Pin to See the Peepshow, and Dreaming in Africa.[7]

Brooke's theatre work includes Harvest, Dying City, Dido Queen of Carthage, In The Club, The Birthday Party, and Absolutely Perhaps. She has also appeared in productions of Poor Beck, A Midsummer Night's Dream, King Lear and Romeo and Juliet, with the Royal Shakespeare Company.[7] From July to August 2008, Brooke played Dorothy Gale in the musical The Wizard of Oz at the Southbank Centre. The production was directed by Jude Kelly.[8] During 2011 at the Almeida Theatre, London, she appeared in Stephen Poliakoff's My City and Neil LaBute's Reasons to be Pretty. From August to October 2015, Brooke played Ophelia alongside Benedict Cumberbatch in the Barbican's production of Hamlet.[9][10]

In 2017, Brooke starred in the fourth season of television crime drama Sherlock as Sherlock Holmes' secret sister, Eurus. She initially auditioned for multiple characters in the show before the showrunners told Brooke that all the characters were one, Eurus, who would be a master of disguise.[11] Michael Hogan writing for The Daily Telegraph in his review of the third episode of the season commented that the role was "a star-making turn from Sian Brooke".[12] Later in the year, she appeared with Sheridan Smith and Gemma Whelan in the BBC miniseries The Moorside, based on the kidnapping of Shannon Matthews.[13] She starred as Karen in the first two seasons (2020–2021) of Apple TV series "Trying", which has been renewed for a third season.[14]

Personal life

Brooke is married and has two children.[1][15] She is an ambassador for the climate change adaptation charity The Glacier Trust.[16]

Filmography

Year(s) Title Role Notes Ref(s)
2002–2003 Dinotopia Krista 5 episodes [1][17]
2005 All About George Laura 6 episodes [18][19]
2005 Under the Greenwood Tree Susan Dewy Television film [20][21]
2006 A Touch of Frost Carol Haymarsh Episode: "Endangered Species" [22]
2006 Housewife, 49 Evelyn Edwards Television film [22]
2007 Foyle's War Phyllis Law Episode: "Bleak Midwinter" [22]
2007 Hotel Babylon Lisa 1 episode [23]
2007 Cape Wrath Lori Marcuse Main cast [24]
2008 The Fixer Melrose Cassidy 1 episode [22]
2008 Midsomer Murders Christine Turner 1 episode [22]
2008 The Commander DC Marian Randall Television film [25]
2009 Doc Martin Claire 1 episode [26]
2010 Vexed Suzie Miller 1 episode [27]
2010 New Tricks Eileen Harrison 1 episode [28]
2011 Garrow's Law Ann Hadfield 1 episode [29]
2011 Silk Annie Laidlaw 1 episode [30]
2013 Man Down Daisy 1 episode [31]
2014 Lewis Jennie Brightway 2 episodes [32]
2015 Not Safe for Work Martine McCutcheon Main cast [33][34]
2017 Sherlock Eurus Holmes Main cast (Series 4) [35]
2017 The Moorside Natalie Brown Miniseries [36][37]
2017 Doctor Foster Sian Lambert Main cast (Series 2) [38]
2019 Good Omens Deirdre Young Main cast [39]
2019 Radioactive Bronia Sklodowska
2019 Guilt Claire Main cast (Series 1)
2020–2021 Trying Karen Main cast
2021 Stephen Cressida Dick Miniseries
2022 No Return Megan McGee Miniseries
2022 House of the Dragon Queen Aemma Arryn 1 episode
("The Heirs of the Dragon")
[40]

Stage

Year(s) Title Role Theatre Notes Ref(s)
2002 Just a Bloke Lisa Royal Court Theatre 7 November – 23 November [41][42]
2002 The One with the Oven Sarah Royal Court Theatre 7 November – 23 November [41][43]
2003 Absolutely! (Perhaps) Dina Wyndham's Theatre 7 May – 13 September [44][45]
2004–2005 Romeo and Juliet Juliet Royal Shakespeare Theatre
Noel Coward Theatre
25 March 2004 – 8 October 2004
16 December 2004 – 8 January 2005
[46][47][48][49]
2004–2005 King Lear Cordelia Royal Shakespeare Theatre
Theatre Royal, Newcastle
Noel Coward Theatre
17 June 2004 – 14 October 2004
16 November 2004 – 20 November 2004
13 January 2005 – 5 February 2005
[50][51][52][53]
2004–2005 Poor Beck Myrrha The Other Place
Soho Theatre
29 September 2004 – 7 October 2004
11 March 2005 – 16 March 2005
[54][55][56]
2005 Harvest Laura Royal Court Theatre 2 September – 1 October [57][58][59]
2006 A Midsummer Night's Dream Hermia Theatre Royal, Nottingham
Hackney Empire
St David's Hall
11 February
12 February
25 March
[60]
2006 Dying City Kelly Royal Court Theatre 12 May – 10 June [61][62]
2007–2008 In the Club Sasha Hampstead Theatre
Richmond Theatre
Festival Theatre, Malvern
Wycombe Swan
Theatre Royal, Brighton
Belgrade Theatre
New Theatre, Cardiff
25 July 2007 – 25 August 2007
12 February 2008 – 16 February 2008
18 February 2008 – 23 February 2008
25 February 2008 – 1 March 2008
3 March 2008 – 8 March 2008
10 March 2008 – 15 March 2008
18 March 2008 – 22 March 2008
[63][64][65]
2008 The Birthday Party Lulu Lyric Theatre 8 May – 24 May [66][67]
2008 The Wizard of Oz Dorothy Royal Festival Hall 23 July – 31 August [8][68]
2009 Dido, Queen of Carthage Anna Royal National Theatre 17 March – 7 May [69][70]
2009 Article 19 Royal Court Theatre 3 July – 4 July [71]
2010 Wanderlust Clare Walsh Royal Court Theatre 9 September – 9 October [72][73][74]
2010 Joseph K Various Gate Theatre 11 November – 18 December [75][76]
2011 Ecstasy Jean Hampstead Theatre
Duchess Theatre
10 March – 9 April
12 April – 28 May
[77][78]
2011 My City Julie Almeida Theatre 8 September – 5 November [79][80]
2011–2012 reasons to be pretty Steph Almeida Theatre 10 November 2011 – 14 January 2012 [81][82]
2013 Tartuffe Elmire Birmingham Repertory Theatre 1 November – 16 November [83][84]
2015 Hamlet Ophelia Barbican Centre 5 August – 31 October [85][86]
2018 I'm Not Running Pauline National Theatre written by David Hare
directed by Neil Armfield
[87]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Sian Brooke on Hamlet, Parenthood and her studies at RADA" (PDF). Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Retrieved 17 January 2017.[dead link]
  2. ^ "Results for Birth, Marriage, Death & Parish Records". Findmypast. Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  3. ^ Fullerton, Huw. "Who plays Sherlock's Euros Holmes?". Radio Times. Retrieved 16 January 2017.
  4. ^ a b c "Sian's performances are praised as she works with the best in British theatre". Lichfield Mercury. 26 January 2012. Archived from the original on 31 January 2017. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  5. ^ Whitfield, Lydia (25 April 2004). "Revealed: Wales's top 50 single women". Wales on Sunday. Retrieved 20 August 2009.
  6. ^ "Sian Brooke". Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  7. ^ a b "National Theatre: Company Members: Sian Brooke". National Theatre. Archived from the original on 17 August 2011.
  8. ^ a b Gardner, Lyn (30 July 2008). "The Wizard of Oz". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  9. ^ Trueman, Matt (18 November 2011). "Sian Brooke: The beauty of changing places". The Stage. Retrieved 12 January 2012.
  10. ^ Sierz, Aleks (18 November 2011). "Reviews: Reasons To Be Pretty". The Stage. Retrieved 12 January 2012.
  11. ^ Jones, Paul. "Sian Brooke auditioned several times for Sherlock after being told that each of Eurus's disguises were separate roles". Radio Times. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  12. ^ Hogan, Michael (17 January 2017). "Sherlock episode 3: The Final Problem, review: 'an exhilarating thrill-ride'". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  13. ^ "Meet the cast of The Moorside". Radio Times. Retrieved 8 February 2017.
  14. ^ Kanter, Jake (24 March 2021). "Apple Renews British Comedy 'Trying' Ahead Of Season 2 Premiere On May 14". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 13 February 2022.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ Mellor, Louisa (13 January 2017). "Sherlock series 4: Sian Brooke on keeping her role secret". Den of Geek.
  16. ^ "Siân Brooke joins The Glacier Trust". The Glacier Trust. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  17. ^ "Dinotopia". TV.com. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  18. ^ "Sian Brooke". TV Guide. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  19. ^ Flett, Kathryn (2 October 2005). "Comfort TV". The Guardian.
  20. ^ "Under the Greenwood Tree Cast and Credits". PBS. Archived from the original on 8 June 2008.
  21. ^ "Under the Greenwood Tree". Ecosse Films. Archived from the original on 11 October 2014.
  22. ^ a b c d e "Siân Brooke". British Film Institute. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  23. ^ "Hotel Babylon – second series coming soon to BBC One". BBC. 20 December 2006.
  24. ^ Terrace, Vincent (6 November 2008). Encyclopedia of Television Shows, 1925 through 2010, 2d ed. McFarland. p. 676. ISBN 978-0-7864-8641-0.
  25. ^ "Abduction (2008)". British Film Institute. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  26. ^ "Doc Martin". Radio Times. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  27. ^ "Vexed, Series 1, Episode 1". BBC. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  28. ^ "New Tricks, Series 7, Episode 4". BBC. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  29. ^ "Garrow's Law, Series 3, Episode 1". BBC. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  30. ^ "Silk, Series 1, Episode 2". BBC. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  31. ^ Brown, David. "Man Down". Radio Times. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  32. ^ "Lewis". Radio Times. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  33. ^ "Sian Brooke interview for Not Safe for Work". Channel 4. 2 June 2015.
  34. ^ Jones, Ellen (21 July 2015). "Not Safe for Work, Channel 4 - TV review: A portrait of a generation of youngish professionals who stay out too late on work nights". The Independent.
  35. ^ Gilbert, Sophie (9 January 2017). "The Mystery of Sherlock's New Antagonist". The Atlantic.
  36. ^ "Sheridan Smith announced to star in new BBC One drama The Moorside Project". BBC. 8 January 2016.
  37. ^ "Sherlock, Broadchurch and the return of Christina Ricci: the best television shows in 2017". The Daily Telegraph. 27 December 2016.
  38. ^ "Sian Brooke on joining BBC hit drama Doctor Foster: The writing is so strong". Sunday Express. 3 September 2017.
  39. ^ "Sherlock star Sian Brooke joins the frankly ridiculous cast of Neil Gaiman's Good Omens". Radio Times. 22 September 2017.
  40. ^ "House of the Dragon – Character Descriptions". WarnerMedia. Archived from the original on 31 March 2022. Retrieved 30 March 2022.
  41. ^ a b "Imprint: The Royal Court Young Writers Festival 2002". London Theatre. 8 October 2002. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  42. ^ "Tour archive for Just a Bloke (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  43. ^ "Tour archive for The One with the Oven (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  44. ^ Billington, Michael (21 May 2003). "Absolutely! (Perhaps)". The Guardian.
  45. ^ "Tour archive for Absolutely!! (Perhaps) (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  46. ^ Orme, Steve. "Romeo and Juliet". The British Theatre Guide. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  47. ^ Billington, Michael (22 December 2004). "Romeo and Juliet". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  48. ^ "Tour archive for Romeo and Juliet (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  49. ^ "Tour archive for Romeo and Juliet (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  50. ^ Billington, Michael (1 July 2004). "King Lear". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  51. ^ "Tour archive for King Lear (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  52. ^ Fisher, Philip. "King Lear". The British Theatre Guide. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  53. ^ "Tour archive for King Lear (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  54. ^ Taylor, Paul (18 October 2004). "The RSC New Work Festival, Swan Theatre and The Other Place, Stratford-upon-Avon". The Independent. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  55. ^ Thaxter, John (23 March 2005). "Poor Beck review at Soho London". The Stage. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  56. ^ "Tour archive for Poor Beck (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  57. ^ Fisher, Philip. "Harvest". The British Theatre Guide. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  58. ^ Berkowitz, Gerald (9 September 2005). "Harvest review at Royal Court London". The Stage. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  59. ^ "Tour archive for Harvest (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  60. ^ "Tour archive for A Midsummer Night's Dream (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  61. ^ Gardner, Lyn (19 May 2006). "Dying City". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  62. ^ "Tour archive for Dying City (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  63. ^ Billington, Michael (6 August 2007). "In the Club". The Guardian. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  64. ^ "Tour archive for In the Club (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  65. ^ "Tour archive for In the Club (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  66. ^ Billington, Michael (13 May 2008). "The Birthday Party". The Guardian. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  67. ^ "Tour archive for The Birthday Party (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  68. ^ "Tour archive for The Wizard of Oz (Musical)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  69. ^ Coveney, Michael (26 March 2009). "Dido, Queen of Carthage, Cottesloe, National Theatre London". The Independent. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  70. ^ "Tour archive for Dido, Queen of Carthage (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  71. ^ "Tour archive for Article 19 (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  72. ^ Billington, Michael (18 September 2010). "Wanderlust". The Guardian. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  73. ^ Benedict, David (20 September 2010). "Wanderlust". Variety. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  74. ^ "Tour archive for Wanderlust (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  75. ^ Jones, Alice (3 December 2010). "Joseph K, Gate Theatre, London". The Independent. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  76. ^ "Tour archive for Joseph K (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  77. ^ Spencer, Charles (16 March 2011). "Ecstasy, Hampstead theatre, review". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  78. ^ "Tour archive for Ecstasy (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  79. ^ Spencer, Charles (16 September 2011). "My City, Almeida Theatre, review". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  80. ^ "Tour archive for My City (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  81. ^ Billington, Michael (18 November 2011). "Reasons to be Pretty – review". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  82. ^ "Tour archive for Reasons to be Pretty (Play)". Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  83. ^ Billington, Michael (7 November 2013). "Tartuffe – review". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  84. ^ "Tour archive for Tartuffe (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  85. ^ Cavendish, Dominic (25 August 2015). "Hamlet, Barbican, review: 'justifies the hysteria'". The Daily Telegraph.
  86. ^ "Tour archive for Hamlet (Play)". UK Theatre Web. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  87. ^ "David Hare's 'I'm Not Running', National Theatre, Lyttelton review: An absorbing, flawed evening". The Independent.

External links