Pakistan women's national cricket team

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Pakistan
Refer to caption
Pakistan Cricket Crest
AssociationPakistan Cricket Board
Personnel
CaptainBismah Maroof
CoachDavid Hemp[1]
International Cricket Council
ICC statusFull member (1952)
ICC regionAsia
ICC Rankings Current[2] Best-ever
WODI 7th 7th (01-Oct-2015)
WT20I 1st 1st
Women's Tests
First WTestv  Sri Lanka at Colts Cricket Club Ground, Colombo; 17–20 April 1998
Last WTestv  West Indies at the National Stadium, Karachi; 15–18 March 2004
WTests Played Won/Lost
Total[3] 3 0/2
(1 draw)
Women's One Day Internationals
First WODIv  New Zealand at Hagley Oval, Christchurch; 28 January 1997
Last WODIv  Sri Lanka at Southend Club Cricket Stadium, Karachi; 5 June 2022
WODIs Played Won/Lost
Total[5] 188 54/130
(1 tie, 3 no results)
This year[6] 10 3/7
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's World Cup appearances4 (first in 1997)
Best result5th (2009)
Women's World Cup Qualifier appearances4 (first in 2003)
Best resultRunners-up (2008, 2011)
Women's Twenty20 Internationals
First WT20Iv  Ireland at The Vineyard, Dublin; 25 May 2009
Last WT20Iv  Australia at Edgbaston, Birmingham; 3 August 2022
WT20Is Played Won/Lost
Total[7] 132 52/73
(3 ties, 4 no results)
This year[8] 9 4/3
(0 ties, 2 no results)
Women's T20 World Cup appearances6 (first in 2009)
Best resultFirst round (2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018)
Women's T20 World Cup Qualifier appearances1 (first in 2013)
Best resultChampions (2013)
As of 3 August 2022

The Pakistan women's national cricket team represents Pakistan in international women's cricket. One of eight teams competing in the ICC Women's Championship (the highest level of international women's cricket), the team is organised by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB), a Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC).

Pakistan made its One Day International (ODI) debut in early 1997, against New Zealand, and later in the year played in the 1997 World Cup in India. The team's inaugural Test match came against Sri Lanka in April 1998. In its early years, Pakistan was one of the least competitive of the top-level women's teams, and after its inaugural appearance in 1997, did not qualify for another World Cup until the 2009 event in Australia. However, the team has played in all four editions of the Women's World Twenty20 to date, and also participated in the Women's Asia Cup and the Asian Games cricket tournament.

The increase in terrorism as a result of the war on terror led to a stagnation of foreign teams touring Pakistan. However, due to a decrease in terrorism in Pakistan over the past few years, as well as an increase in security, West Indies women's cricket team and Bangladesh women's national cricket team have toured Pakistan multiple times since 2015.

Support staff

History

A photograph of Sana Mir
Sana Mir, former captain of Pakistan women cricket team

1990s

The concept of Women's cricket was first introduced in Pakistan by two sisters Shaiza and Sharmeen Khan in 1996. In conservative Pakistan the creation of a Pakistan women`s cricket team was even considered illegal and was met with court cases and even death threats. The government refused them permission to play India in 1997 and ruled that women were forbidden from playing sports in public due to the religious issues.[9][10]

However, the team did manage to overcome these objections and represented Pakistan in 1997, playing against New Zealand and Australia. They lost all three One Day International matches on that tour, but they were still invited to take part in the Women's Cricket World Cup later that year in India. They lost all five matches in the tournament and finished last, out of the eleven teams in the competition. The following year, Pakistan toured Sri Lanka and played three One Day International matches, losing all of their matches and played in their first Test match, which they also lost.

2000s

In 2000, Pakistan toured Ireland for a five match One Day International series against Ireland. They lost the Test match by an innings inside two days and the One Day International series 4–0, with one match interrupted by rain. Their first international win, in their 19th match, came against the Netherlands in a seven match One Day International series at their home ground in 2001, a series which they won 4–3. This form did not continue into their six One Day International tour of Sri Lanka in January 2002 though and they again lost all six matches.

In 2003, Pakistan travelled to the Netherlands to take part in the 2003 IWCC Trophy, the inaugural edition of what is now called simply the World Cup Qualifier. They finished fourth in the tournament, their victories were against Japan and Scotland, however they were missing out on qualification for the 2005 World Cup. This tournament was marred by a schism between the Pakistan Women's Cricket Control Association and the Pakistan Cricket Board. The IWCC did not recognise the Pakistan Cricket Board as the governing body of women's cricket in Pakistan and court cases were brought in Pakistan.[11] The Pakistan Cricket Board announced that they would not be sending a team to the tournament and that no other team should be allowed to represent the country in the competition.[12] This problem has since been overcome with the International Cricket Council requirement that women's associations and men's associations are unified under one single governing body.

2004 saw the West Indies tour Pakistan, playing seven One Day International matches and a Test match. The Test match was drawn and West Indies won the One Day International series 5–2, but those two victories for Pakistan were their first against a Test playing nation.

In 2005, Pakistan Cricket Board established a Women's Wing to oversee all Cricket Affairs under the Pakistan Cricket Board's control and to unite all the conflicts between various associations. The first international event was when Indian Under 21 team toured Pakistan, becoming the first Indian women's side to tour the country. This paved the way for Pakistan to host the second Women's Asia Cup in December 2005/January 2006. They lost all their games however, finishing last in the three team tournament. The tournament featured the first match between the Indian and Pakistani women's cricket teams.

Early in 2007, the Pakistan squad toured South Africa and played in a five match, One Day International series. During that year, Pakistan was awarded to Host the ICC Women's World Cup Qualifiers in which eight teams were scheduled to participate. All of the arrangements were almost completed when unfortunately the event was postponed due to political instability and was moved to South Africa. The Pakistan Women Team qualified for the ICC Women World Cup by defeating Ireland, Zimbabwe, Scotland and Netherlands. They qualified for this tournament after defeating Hong Kong in a three match series in Pakistan in September 2006.

In Pakistan, views towards Women' cricket have softened considerably since its introduction. Cricket is currently seen as an improvement for women's rights.[9][10]

In June 2019, the PCB reduced the number of contracted players from 17 to 10, but increased remuneration for the retained players.[13][14]

World Cup records

Women's ODI World Cup

Pakistan have participated in four editions of the Women's Cricket World Cup: 1997 Women's Cricket World Cup, 2009 Women's Cricket World Cup, 2013 Women's Cricket World Cup and 2017 Women's Cricket World Cup.[15] The team did not win any of their matches during the 1997 Cricket World Cup and finished at eleventh place. Pakistan saw their first win in the 2009 World Cup; they advanced to the Super Six round defeating Sri Lanka in group stage match by 57 runs with Nain Abidi scoring 26 runs, and the player of the match Qanita Jalil taking 3 wickets for 33.[16] They qualified for the 5th place playoff match defeating West Indies in the Super Sixes by 4 wickets,[17] but finished at 6th place losing to the same team by 3 wickets.[18] They were winless in both the 2013 World Cup and the 2017 World Cup.

Women's T20I World Cup

Pakistan Women's team during the ICC T20 World Cup

Pakistan have participated in all the editions of the ICC Women's World Twenty20. They lost all of their games in 2009 ICC Women's World Twenty20 and 2010 ICC Women's World Twenty20. In the 2012 edition, they registered their solitary win over India. Pakistan defeated them by 1 run with Sana Mir scoring 26 runs and Nida Dar—who was awarded player of the match—taking 3 wickets for 12 runs.[19] Pakistan finished with 7th place playoff in the 2014 ICC Women's World Twenty20; they defeated Sri Lanka by 14 runs in the playoffs. Bismah Maroof scored 62 runs not out and Sania Khan took 3 wickets for 24 runs. Maroof was awarded woman of the match.[20]

Asia Cup

The Pakistan women's cricket team did not participate in the inaugural edition of the women's Asia cup in 2004–05, Sri Lanka and India played a five-match series in Sri Lanka.[21] Pakistan hosted the second edition of the Asia Cup in 2005–06, but they did not win a single game of the tournament.[22] India won the final by 97 runs, against Sri Lanka, played at the National Stadium, Karachi.[23] In the third edition of the women's Asia Cup, once again Pakistan failed to see a victory, and this was the third consecutive occasion that India and Sri Lanka were playing in the final.[24] In the 2008 edition of the Women's Asia Cup, Pakistan registered their only victory against the Bangladeshi women's cricket team who were participating for the first time in Asia Cup.[25]

The 2012 edition was a Twenty20 version of the game that took place in Guangzhou, China from 24 to 31 October 2012. Pakistan reached into the final of the tournament, and lost to India by 18 runs. Bismah Maroof was awarded woman of the tournament for her all-round performance.[26][27]

Asian Games

Asian Games 2010

The Pakistan national women's cricket team won a gold medal in the inaugural women's cricket tournament in the 2010 Asian Games that took place in Guangzhou, China. In the final match at the 2010 Asian Games, Pakistan defeated Bangladesh women cricket team by 10 wickets. Bangladeshi women made 92 runs for 9 wickets with their captain Salma Khatun scoring 24; Nida Dar took 3 wickets giving away 16 runs in 4 overs. Pakistan women achieved the target of 93 runs in 15.4 overs without losing wickets: Dar scored 51 from 43 balls and Javeria Khan scored 39 runs from 51 balls, both remained not out.[28][29] Asif Ali Zardari, the then-president of Pakistan, termed the team's win as a "gift to the nation riding on a series of crises" as 21 million people were affected by flood in 2010.[30]

Asian Games 2014

In the 2014 Asian games, Pakistan women's cricket team defeated again Bangladesh women cricket team in the final match by four runs in Incheon, South Korea.[31] In the low scoring match, Pakistan women scored 97 runs in 20 for 6 wickets. The match was interrupted by rain. Bangladesh women innings reduced to 7 overs and their revised target was 43 runs per Duckworth–Lewis method; they scored 38 runs for 9 wickets. This was the second consecutive title won by the Pakistan women against the same team in Asian Games.[32][33]

Tournament history

Pakistan Team at ICC Women's Cricket World Cup in Sydney, March 2009.

A red box around the year indicates tournaments played within Pakistan

World Cup

World Cup record
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
England 1973 Did not participate
India 1978
New Zealand 1982
Australia 1988
England 1993
India 1997 Round 1 11/11 5 0 5 0 0
New Zealand 2000 Did not participate
South Africa 2005 Did not qualify
Australia 2009 Super Sixes 5/8 7 2 5 0 0
India 2013 Round 1 8/8 4 0 4 0 0
England 2017 7 0 7 0 0
New Zealand 2022 Qualified
Total 4/11 0 Titles 23 2 21 0 0

World T20

World Twenty20 record
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
England 2009 Round 1 8/8 3 0 3 0 0
Cricket West Indies 2010 3 0 3 0 0
Sri Lanka 2012 7/8 3 1 2 0 0
Bangladesh 2014 8/10 4 1 3 0 0
India 2016 6/10 4 2 2 0 0
Cricket West Indies 2018 8/10 4 1 3 0 0
Australia 2020 7/10 4 1 2 0 1
Total 7/7 0 Titles 25 6 18 0 1

Asia Cup

One-Day Internationals

Asia Cup record
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
Sri Lanka 2004 Did not participate
Pakistan 2005–06 Round 1 3/3 4 0 4 0 0
India 2006 Round 1 4 0 4 0 0
Sri Lanka 2008 Round 1 3/4 6 1 5 0 0
Total 3/4 0 Titles 14 1 13 0 0

Twenty20 Internationals

Asia Cup record
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
China 2012 Runners-up 2/8 5 3 2 0 0
Thailand 2016 2/6 6 4 2 0 0
Malaysia 2018 Group League 3/6 5 3 2 0 0
Total 3/3 0 Titles 16 10 6 0 0

Asian Games

Asian Games
Year Round Position GP W L T NR
China 2010 Champions 1/8 4 4 0 0 0
South Korea 2014 1/10 3 3 0 0 0
Total 2/2 2 Titles 7 7 0 0 0

Honours

Asian Games :

Gold medal (2) : Guangzhou 2010, Incheon 2014

Squad

This lists all the players who have a central contract or have played for Pakistan since Jan 2021 and the forms in which they have played.

Name Age Batting style Bowling style Contract Forms
Captains and Batters
Bismah Maroof 31 Left-handed Right-arm leg break A -
Javeria Khan 34 Right-handed Right-arm off break A ODI, T20I
Batters
Omaima Sohail 25 Right-handed Right-arm medium-fast C ODI, T20I
Ayesha Naseem 18 Right-handed Right-arm medium Emerging ODI, T20I
Ayesha Zafar 27 Right-handed Right-arm leg break - ODI, T20I
Nahida Khan 35 Right-handed Right-arm medium C ODI, T20I
Iram Javed 30 Right-handed Right-arm medium-fast - T20I
Sidra Ameen 30 Right-handed Right-arm medium - ODI
Kaynat Hafeez 26 Right-handed Right-arm off break Emerging -
All-rounders
Nida Dar 35 Right-handed Right-arm off break C ODI, T20I
Aliya Riaz 29 Right-handed Right-arm medium B ODI, T20I
Kainat Imtiaz 30 Right-handed Right-arm medium-fast C ODI, T20I
Wicket-keepers
Muneeba Ali 24 Right-handed - Emerging ODI, T20I
Sidra Nawaz 28 Right-handed - B ODI, T20I
Spin Bowlers
Nashra Sandhu 24 Right-handed Slow left-arm orthodox C ODI, T20I
Anam Amin 29 Right-handed Slow left-arm orthodox C ODI, T20I
Sadia Iqbal 27 Left-handed Slow left-arm orthodox Emerging ODI
Syeda Aroob Shah 18 Right-handed Right-arm leg break Emerging -
Rameen Shamim 26 Left-handed Right-arm off break Emerging ODI
Saba Nazir 29 Right-handed Right-arm off break Emerging -
Pace Bowlers
Diana Baig 26 Right-handed Right-arm medium B ODI, T20I
Fatima Sana 20 Right-handed Right-arm medium Emerging ODI, T20I
Aiman Anwer 30 Right-handed Right-arm medium-fast - T20I


Former players

Records and Statistics

International Match Summary — Pakistan Women[34][35][36]

Last updated 3 August 2022

Playing Record
Format M W L T NR/Draw Inaugural Match
Women's Test 3 0 2 0 1 17 April 1998
Women's One-Day Internationals 188 54 130 1 3 28 January 1997
Women's Twenty20 Internationals 132 52 73 3 4 25 May 2009

Women's Test cricket

Women's Test record versus other nations[34]

Records complete to Women's Test #122. Last updated 18 March 2004.

Opponent Matches Won Lost Tied Draw First match First win
 Ireland 1 0 1 0 0 30–31 July 2000
 Sri Lanka 1 0 1 0 0 17–20 April 1998
 West Indies 1 0 0 0 1 15–18 March 2004

Women's One-Day International

WODI record versus other nations[35]

Records complete to WODI #1277. Last updated 5 June 2022.

Opponent Matches Won Lost Tied N/R First match First win
ICC Full members
 Australia 13 0 13 0 0 7 February 1997
 Bangladesh 12 6 6 0 0 20 August 2012 20 August 2012
 England 12 0 11 0 1 12 December 1997
 India 11 0 11 0 0 30 December 2005
 Ireland 18 12 6 0 0 18 December 1997 18 February 2008
 New Zealand 14 1 13 0 0 28 January 1997 12 December 1997
 South Africa 25 4 19 1 1 16 December 1997 24 November 2011
 Sri Lanka 33 11 22 0 0 11 April 1998 21 April 2011
 West Indies 34 10 24 0 0 25 July 2003 25 March 2004
 Zimbabwe 1 1 0 0 0 27 November 2021 27 November 2021
ICC Associate members
 Denmark 1 0 1 0 0 10 December 1997
 Japan 1 1 0 0 0 21 July 2003 21 July 2003
 Netherlands 12 7 4 0 1 9 April 2001 9 April 2001
 Scotland 1 1 0 0 0 22 July 2003 22 July 2003

Women's T20I cricket

WT20I record versus other nations[36]

Records complete to WT20I #1186. Last updated 3 August 2022.

Opponent Matches Won Lost Tied N/R First match First win
ICC Full members
 Australia 13 0 11 0 2 29 September 2012
 Bangladesh 15 14 1 0 0 29 August 2012 29 August 2012
 Barbados 1 0 1 0 0 29 July 2022
 England 14 1 13 0 0 16 June 2009 5 July 2013
 India 12 2 10 0 0 13 June 2009 1 October 2012
 Ireland 15 13 2 0 0 25 May 2009 28 May 2009
 New Zealand 8 0 8 0 0 10 May 2010
 South Africa 18 7 11 0 0 16 October 2010 19 January 2014
 Sri Lanka 15 8 6 0 1 12 June 2009 16 January 2015
 West Indies 16 3 10 3 0 6 September 2011 10 September 2011
ICC Associate members
 Malaysia 1 1 0 0 0 7 June 2018 7 June 2018
 Netherlands 1 1 0 0 0 24 April 2011 24 April 2011
 Thailand 2 1 0 0 1 3 June 2018 3 June 2018

Note: Pakistan Women lost all 3 tied matches against West Indies in Super Over.

See also

References

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  2. ^ "ICC Rankings". International Cricket Council.
  3. ^ "Women's Test matches - Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  4. ^ "Women's Test matches - 2022 Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  5. ^ "WODI matches - Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  6. ^ "WODI matches - 2022 Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  7. ^ "WT20I matches - Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  8. ^ "WT20I matches - 2022 Team records". ESPNcricinfo.
  9. ^ a b "Bowlers in baggy pants will bat for women's rights". Retrieved 23 September 2005.
  10. ^ a b "Women defy Pakistan road race ban". BBC News. 21 May 2005. Retrieved 23 September 2005.
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  12. ^ "Pakistan pulls team out off IWCC qualifying tournament". ESPN cricinfo. Retrieved 12 July 2003.
  13. ^ "PCB brings down contracted women players from 17 to 10". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  14. ^ "PCB announces improved central contracts for women cricketers". Pakistan Cricket Board. Retrieved 25 June 2019.
  15. ^ "List of Matches for Pakistan Women in Women's World Cup matches". Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB). Retrieved 28 September 2014.
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  19. ^ Mitchener, Mark (22 March 2014). "Women's World Twenty20 2014: Team guide & players to watch". BBC Sport. Retrieved 28 March 2013.
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  23. ^ "Raj leads India to Asia Cup glory". ESPNcricinfo. 4 January 2006. Retrieved 27 September 2014.
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External links

Further reading

External links