India women's national field hockey team

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

India
Hockey India Logo.svg
Nickname(s)Nabhvarna
AssociationHockey India
ConfederationASHF (Asia)
Head CoachJanneke Schopman
Assistant coach(es)Patrick Tshutshani
ManagerTushar Khandekar
CaptainSavita Punia
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Home
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Team colours
Away
FIH ranking
Current 9 Decrease 3 (19 July 2022)[1]
Highest6 (June 2022)
First international
Scotland  6–1  India
(Folkestone, England; 30 September 1953)[2]
Biggest win
India  24–0    Nepal
(Guwahati, India; 7 February 2016)[3]
Biggest defeat
England  18–0  India
(Sydney, Australia; 23 May 1956)[4]
Olympic Games
Appearances3 (first in 1980)
Best result4th (1980, 2020)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1974)
Best result4th (1974)
Asian Games
Appearances11 (first in 1982)
Best result1st Gold (1982)
Asia Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1989)
Best result1st Gold (2004, 2017)

The Indian women's national field hockey team (nicknamed the Nabhvarna) represents India in international field hockey, and is governed by Hockey India. Nabhvarna are currently ranked 6th in the FIH World Rankings, and are ranked as the best team in Asia. They have won the gold medals at the 2002 Commonwealth Games and 1982 Asian Games. They have also won the Women's Asia Cup twice, i.e. in 2004 and 2017. They also won the Asian Champions Trophy in 2016. India at the 2020 Summer Olympics,[5] for the first time ever, reached the semi-final in the Women's Hockey Olympic event but failed to bag any medal after they lost to Argentina[6] in the semi-final and then to Great Britain[7] in Bronze medal match.

Performance history

The team's breakthrough performance came at the Women's Hockey World Cup at Mandelieu in 1974, where it finished in 4th place. Their best performance in the Olympic Games was at 1980 Moscow Summer Olympics (where they came in 4th), when a women's event was held for the first time in Olympic history. The team also won the Gold medal at the inaugural 1982 Asian Games held in New Delhi, defeating Korea in the finals. Captain Suraj Lata Devi led the team to the Gold for three consecutive years at different events- during the 2002 Commonwealth Games,[8] the 2003 Afro-Asian Games, and the 2004 Women's Hockey Asia Cup. Team members were referred to as the "assi (Jasjeet) jaisi koi nahi" or the "Golden Girls of Hockey," after the 2004 win.[9] The team earned a 3rd-place finish at the 2013 Women's Hockey Asia Cup at Kuala Lumpur defeating China in a shootout.[10] At the 2014 Commonwealth Games, it finished in 5th place but at 2014 Asian Games, Incheon stunned Japan 2–1 in a tight match to clinch their third bronze medal at the Asian Games.[11] During the summer of 2015, the team hosted the Round 2 of the 2014–15 Women's FIH Hockey World League and finished on top to qualify for the next stage. At the World League Semi-finals held in Antwerp the team finished in the fifth place beating higher ranked Japan in classification match.[12] The Indian woman's national field hockey team qualified for the 2016 Summer Olympics[13][14] for the first time since the 1980 Summer Olympics.[13][15] They were eliminated in the group stage, however, where they placed 6th.

2002 Commonwealth Games and Chak De! India (2007)

The 2002 Commonwealth Games Squad, led by Captain Suraj Lata Devi, competed in the 2002 Commonwealth Games. The team entered the finals after defeating the New Zealand women's national field hockey team.[16] and placed first, winning the Gold after they beat the English women's hockey team.[8][17][18]

This event served as the inspiration for the 2007 Bollywood film about women's field hockey, Chak De! India starring Shah Rukh Khan (after screenwriter Jaideep Sahni read a short article about it).[19] Sahni began to model the character of Kabir Khan on hockey coach Maharaj Krishan Kaushik.[20] After hearing the storyline, Kaushik suggested that Sahni meet hockey player Mir Ranjan Negi (who faced accusations of throwing the match against Pakistan during the 1982 Asian Games).[21][22][23] Sahni has stated that he was unaware of Negi's tribulations while writing the script and that the resemblance with Negi's life was entirely coincidental.[24] Negi affirmed this point stating that he didn't "want to hog the limelight. This movie is not a documentary of Mir Ranjan Negi's life. It is in fact the story of a team that becomes a winning lot from a bunch of hopeless girls".[25] In response to the fact that the media equated Kabir Khan with Negi, Sahni said that "Our script was written a year and a half back. It is very unfortunate that something, which is about women athletes, has just started becoming about Negi."[20]

Medal table

Tournament Gold Silver Bronze Total
Pro League 0 0 1 1
Commonwealth Games 1 1 1 3
Asian Games 1 2 3 6
Asia Cup 2 2 3 7
Asian Champions Trophy 1 2 1 4
Champions Challenge 0 0 1 1
Afro-Asian Games 1 0 0 1
Hockey Series 1 0 0 1
South Asian Games 1 0 0 1
Total 8 7 10 25

Tournament record

Summer Olympics

No Year Host Position
1 1980 Soviet Union Moscow, USSR
4th
2 2016 Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
12th
3 2020 Japan Tokyo, Japan
4th

World Cup

No Year Host Position
1 1974 France Mandelieu, France
4th
2 1978 Spain Madrid, Spain
7th
3 1983 Malaysia Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
11th
4 1998 Netherlands Utrecht, Netherlands
12th
5 2006 Spain Madrid, Spain
11th
6 2010 Argentina Rosario, Argentina
9th
7 2018 England London, England
8th
8 2022 Netherlands Amstelveen, Netherlands
Spain Valencia, Spain
9th

Commonwealth Games

No Year Host Position
1 1998 Malaysia Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
4th
4 2002 England Manchester, England
1st place, gold medalist(s)
2 2006 Australia Melbourne, Australia
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
3 2010 India New Delhi, India
5th
4 2014 Scotland Glasgow, Scotland
5th
5 2018 Australia Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
4th
6 2022 England Birmingham, England
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Asian Games

No Year Host Position
1 1982 India New Delhi, India
1st place, gold medalist(s)
2 1986 South Korea Seoul, South Korea
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
3 1990 China Beijing, China
4th
4 1994 Japan Hiroshima, Japan
4th
5 1998 Thailand Bangkok, Thailand
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
6 2002 South Korea Busan, South Korea
4th
7 2006 Qatar Doha, Qatar
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
8 2010 China Guangzhou, China
4th
9 2014 South Korea Incheon, South Korea
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
10 2018 Indonesia Jakarta, Indonesia
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
11 2022 China Hangzhou, China
Qualified

Asia Cup

No Year Host Position
1 1989 Hong Kong Hong Kong
4th
2 1993 Japan Hiroshima, Japan
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
3 1999 India New Delhi, India
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
4 2004 India New Delhi, India
1st place, gold medalist(s)
5 2007 Hong Kong Hong Kong
4th
6 2009 Thailand Bangkok, Thailand
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
7 2013 Malaysia Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
8 2017 Japan Kakamigahara, Gifu, Japan
1st place, gold medalist(s)
9 2022 Oman Muscat, Oman
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

Asian Champions Trophy

No Year Host Position
1 2010 South Korea Busan, South Korea
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
2 2011 China Ordos, China
4th
3 2013 Japan Kakamigahara, Japan
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
4 2016 Singapore Singapore
1st place, gold medalist(s)
5 2018 South Korea Donghae City, South Korea
2nd place, silver medalist(s)
6 2021 South Korea Donghae City, South Korea Withdrew

FIH Pro League

No Year Final Host Position
1 2021–22 N/A
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)

FIH Hockey Nations Cup

No Year Final Host Position
1 2022 Spain Valencia, Spain
Qualified

South Asian Games

No Year Host Position
1 2016 India Guwahati, India
1st place, gold medalist(s)

Defunct competitions

World League

No Year Final Host Position
1 2012–13 Argentina San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina
14th
2 2014–15 Argentina Rosario, Argentina
10th
3 2016–17 New Zealand Auckland, New Zealand
16th

Champions Challenge

No Year Host Position
1 2002 South Africa Johannesburg, South Africa
3rd place, bronze medalist(s)
2 2011 Republic of Ireland Dublin, Ireland
7th
3 2012 Republic of Ireland Dublin, Ireland
7th
4 2014 Scotland Glasgow, Scotland
8th

Hockey Series

No Year Host Position
1 2018–19 Japan Hiroshima, Japan
1st place, gold medalist(s)

Afro-Asian Games

No Year Host Position
1 2003 India Hyderabad, India
1st place, gold medalist(s)

Results and fixtures

2022

21 January 2022 2022 Asia Cup India  9–0  Malaysia Muscat, Oman
20:00 Vandana field hockey ball 8'34'
Ekka field hockey ball 10'
Sushila field hockey ball 15'27'
Lalremsiami field hockey ball 38'
Monika field hockey ball 40'
Sharmila field hockey ball 46'59'
Report Stadium: Sultan Qaboos Sports Complex
23 January 2022 2022 Asia Cup Japan  2–0  India Muscat, Oman
19:00 Nagai field hockey ball 2'
S. Tanaka field hockey ball 42'
Report Stadium: Sultan Qaboos Sports Complex
24 January 2022 2022 Asia Cup India  9–1  Singapore Muscat, Oman
19:00 Monika field hockey ball 6'17'
Vandana field hockey ball 8'
G. Kaur field hockey ball 8'37'48'
Kujur field hockey ball 10'
Jyoti field hockey ball 43'58'
Report Toh field hockey ball 43' Stadium: Sultan Qaboos Sports Complex
26 January 2022 2022 Asia Cup South Korea  3–2  India Muscat, Oman
16:30 Cheon field hockey ball 31'
Lee S. field hockey ball 45'
Cho field hockey ball 47'
Report Neha field hockey ball 28'
Lalremsiami field hockey ball 54'
Stadium: Sultan Qaboos Sports Complex
28 January 2022 2022 Asia Cup India  2–0  China Muscat, Oman
16:30 Sharmila field hockey ball 13'
Gurjit field hockey ball 19'
Report Stadium: Sultan Qaboos Sports Complex
31 January 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League China  1–7  India Muscat, Oman
15:00 Deng field hockey ball 43' Report Navneet field hockey ball 5'
Neha field hockey ball 12'
Vandana field hockey ball 40'
Sushila field hockey ball 47'52'
Sharmila field hockey ball 48'
Gurjit field hockey ball 50'
Stadium: Sultan Qaboos Sports Complex
1 February 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League China  1–2  India Muscat, Oman
15:00 Wang field hockey ball 39' Report Gurjit field hockey ball 3'49' Stadium: Sultan Qaboos Sports Complex
26 February 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League India  2–1  Spain Bhubaneswar, India
17:00 Jyoti field hockey ball 20'
Neha field hockey ball 52'
Report Segú field hockey ball 18' Stadium: Kalinga Stadium
27 February 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League India  3–4  Spain Bhubaneswar, India
17:00 Sangita field hockey ball 10'
Salima field hockey ball 22'
Namita field hockey ball 49'
Report B. Garcia field hockey ball 4'
M. García field hockey ball 15'
Iglesias field hockey ball 24'
Giné field hockey ball 60'
Stadium: Kalinga Stadium
8 April 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League India  2–1  Netherlands Bhubaneswar, India
19:30 Neha field hockey ball 11'
Sonika field hockey ball 28'
Report Jansen field hockey ball 40' Stadium: Kalinga Stadium
11 June 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League Belgium  2–1  India Antwerp, Belgium
14:00 Nelen field hockey ball 3'
Ballenghien field hockey ball 35'
Report Lalremsiami field hockey ball 48' Stadium: Wilrijkse Plein Antwerp
12 June 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League Belgium  5–0  India Antwerp, Belgium
14:00 Nelen field hockey ball 2'
Englebert field hockey ball 4'
Raye field hockey ball 19'
Vanden Borre field hockey ball 23'
Ballenghien field hockey ball 36'
Report Stadium: Wilrijkse Plein Antwerp
19 June 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League India  2–3  Argentina Rotterdam, Netherlands
14:00 Salima field hockey ball 23'
Grace field hockey ball 48'
Report Thome field hockey ball 38'
Trinchinetti field hockey ball 41'
Gorzelany field hockey ball 43'
Stadium: Hazelaarweg Stadion
21 June 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League United States  2–4  India Rotterdam, Netherlands
16:30 Grega field hockey ball 28'
Konerth field hockey ball 45+'
Report Grace field hockey ball 31'
Navneet field hockey ball 32'
Sonika field hockey ball 40'
Vandana field hockey ball 50'
Stadium: Hazelaarweg Stadion
22 June 2022 2021–22 FIH Pro League United States  0–4  India Rotterdam, Netherlands
16:30 Report Vandana field hockey ball 39'54'
Sonika field hockey ball 54'
Sangita field hockey ball 57'
Stadium: Hazelaarweg Stadion
3 July 2022 2022 World Cup England  1–1  India Amstelveen, Netherlands
16:30 Petter field hockey ball 9' Report Vandana field hockey ball 28' Stadium: Wagener Stadium
5 July 2022 2022 World Cup India  1–1  China Amstelveen, Netherlands
16:30 Vandana field hockey ball 45' Report Zheng field hockey ball 26' Stadium: Wagener Stadium
7 July 2022 2022 World Cup India  3–4  New Zealand Amstelveen, Netherlands
16:30 Vandana field hockey ball 4'
Lalremsiami field hockey ball 44'
Gurjit field hockey ball 59'
Report Merry field hockey ball 12'54'
Jopp field hockey ball 29'
Davies field hockey ball 32'
Stadium: Wagener Stadium
10 July 2022 2022 World Cup Spain  1–0  India Terrassa, Spain
21:30 Segú field hockey ball 57' Report Stadium: Estadi Olímpic de Terrassa
13 July 2022 2022 World Cup India  3–1  Japan Terrassa, Spain
16:30 Navneet field hockey ball 30'45'
Grace field hockey ball 38'
Report Asai field hockey ball 20' Stadium: Estadi Olímpic de Terrassa
29 July 2022 2022 Commonwealth Games India  5–0  Ghana Birmingham, England
14:00 Gurjit field hockey ball 3'34'
Neha field hockey ball 28'
Sangita field hockey ball 36'
Salima field hockey ball 56'
Report Stadium: University of Birmingham Hockey and Squash Centre
30 July 2022 2022 Commonwealth Games India  3–1  Wales Birmingham, England
19:00 Vandana field hockey ball 26'48'
Gurjit field hockey ball 28'
Report Hughes field hockey ball 45' Stadium: University of Birmingham Hockey and Squash Centre
2 August 2022 2022 Commonwealth Games India  1–3  England Birmingham, England
14:00 Vandana field hockey ball 60' Report Ansley field hockey ball 3'
Howard field hockey ball 40'
Martin field hockey ball 52'
Stadium: University of Birmingham Hockey and Squash Centre
3 August 2022 2022 Commonwealth Games Canada  2–3  India Birmingham, England
11:00 Stairs field hockey ball 23'
Haughn field hockey ball 39'
Report Salima field hockey ball 3'
Navneet Kaur field hockey ball 22'
Lalremsiami field hockey ball 51'
Stadium: University of Birmingham Hockey and Squash Centre
5 August 2022 2022 Commonwealth Games Australia  1–1
(3–0 p)
 India Birmingham, England
20:15 Greiner field hockey ball 10' Report Vandana field hockey ball 49' Stadium: University of Birmingham Hockey and Squash Centre
Penalties
Malone Penalty shoot-out scored
Nobbs Penalty shoot-out scored
Lawton Penalty shoot-out scored
Penalty shoot-out missed Lalremsiami
Penalty shoot-out missed Neha
Penalty shoot-out missed Navneet Kaur
7 August 2022 2022 Commonwealth Games New Zealand  v
(1–2 p)
 India Birmingham, England
09:00 Merry field hockey ball 60' Report Salima field hockey ball 29' Stadium: University of Birmingham Hockey and Squash Centre
Penalties
Hull Penalty shoot-out scored
Ralph Penalty shoot-out missed
Tynan Penalty shoot-out missed
Doar Penalty shoot-out missed
Shannon Penalty shoot-out missed
Penalty shoot-out missed Sangita
Penalty shoot-out scored Sonika
Penalty shoot-out scored Navneet
Penalty shoot-out missed Neha

Players

Current squad

The following 18 players were named on 20 June 2022 for the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England.[26]

Caps updated as of 7 August 2022, after the match against New Zealand.

Head coach: Janneke Schopman

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
11 GK Savita Punia (captain) (1990-07-11) 11 July 1990 (age 32) 240 0 India NCOE, Delhi
13 GK Rajani Etimarpu (1990-09-06) 6 September 1990 (age 31) 96 0 India Railways

3 DF Deep Grace Ekka (1994-06-03) 3 June 1994 (age 28) 240 17 India Railways
2 DF Gurjit Kaur (1995-10-25) 25 October 1995 (age 26) 124 82 India Railways
8 DF Nikki Pradhan (1993-12-08) 8 December 1993 (age 28) 139 2 India Railways
18 DF Udita Duhan (1998-01-14) 14 January 1998 (age 24) 70 4 India Indian Oil Corporation Ltd.

15 MF Nisha Warsi (1995-07-09) 9 July 1995 (age 27) 49 1 India Railways
27 MF Sushila Chanu (1992-02-25) 25 February 1992 (age 30) 220 6 India Railways
4 MF Monika Malik (1993-11-05) 5 November 1993 (age 28) 190 12 India Railways
32 MF Neha Goyal (1996-11-15) 15 November 1996 (age 25) 115 17 India Railways
24 MF Jyoti (1999-12-11) 11 December 1999 (age 22) 42 5 India Indian Oil Corporation Ltd.
5 MF Sonika Tandi (1997-03-20) 20 March 1997 (age 25) 59 6 India Income Tax
30 MF Salima Tete (2001-12-27) 27 December 2001 (age 20) 65 6 India Railways

16 FW Vandana Katariya (1992-04-15) 15 April 1992 (age 30) 276 83 India Railways
20 FW Lalremsiami (2000-03-30) 30 March 2000 (age 22) 98 29 India Railways
25 FW Navneet Kaur (1996-01-26) 26 January 1996 (age 26) 119 34 India Railways
7 FW Sharmila Devi (2001-10-10) 10 October 2001 (age 20) 45 7 India Indian Oil Corporation Ltd.
58 FW Sangita Kumari (2001-12-24) 24 December 2001 (age 20) 12 3 India Railways

Recent call-ups

These players were called-up in the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Bichu Devi Kharibam (2000-12-03) 3 December 2000 (age 21) 4 0 India Indian Oil Corporation Ltd. 2022 Hockey World Cup

DF Mahima Choudhary (1999-12-06) 6 December 1999 (age 22) 1 0 India Railway Sports Promotion Board 2021–22 Pro League
DF Suman Devi Thoudam (1999-07-16) 16 July 1999 (age 23) 12 0 India Madhya Pradesh Hockey Academy 2021–22 Pro League
DF Rashmita Minz (1997-12-16) 16 December 1997 (age 24) 13 0 India Odisha Police 2021–22 Pro League
DF Ishika Chaudhary (2000-04-15) 15 April 2000 (age 22) 10 0 India Madhya Pradesh Hockey Academy 2021–22 Pro League

MF Reena Khokhar (1993-04-10) 10 April 1993 (age 29) 45 1 India Railway Sports Promotion Board 2020 Summer Olympics
MF Namita Toppo (1995-06-04) 4 June 1995 (age 27) 168 6 India Odisha Mining Corporation 2021–22 Pro League
MF Baljeet Kaur (2001-03-23) 23 March 2001 (age 21) 1 0 India Hockey Punjab 2021–22 Pro League

FW Rani Rampal (1994-12-04) 4 December 1994 (age 27) 250 117 India Hockey Haryana 2021–22 Pro League
MF Navjot Kaur (1995-03-07) 7 March 1995 (age 27) 202 18 India Railways 2022 Hockey World Cup
DF Akshata Abaso Dhekale (2001-11-02) 2 November 2001 (age 20) 4 0 India Indian Oil Corporation Ltd. 2022 Hockey World Cup
FW Deepika (2000-06-12) 12 June 2000 (age 22) 6 0 India Hockey Haryana 2021–22 Pro League
FW Rajwinder Kaur (1998-11-19) 19 November 1998 (age 23) 4 2 India Hockey Punjab 2021–22 Pro League
FW Mariana Kujur (1999-04-20) 20 April 1999 (age 23) 8 1 India Railway Sports Promotion Board 2021–22 Pro League
FW Aishwarya Chavan (1997-10-18) 18 October 1997 (age 24) 1 0 India Hockey Maharashtra 2021–22 Pro League

Awards

Summer Olympics
Hockey World Cup
Hockey Champions Challenge
Dhyan Chand Award
Arjuna Awards

The following is a list of recipients for the Arjuna award in hockey recipients (by year):

See also

References

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  2. ^ "India women take on Scotland in hockey". 3 October 2010. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  3. ^ "Before 26–0: Indian hockey team's biggest wins before Hong Kong rout". 22 August 2018. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  4. ^ "Women Field Hockey VI IFWHA World Conference 1956 Sydney (AUS) – 23.05–03.06 South Africa". todor66.com. Retrieved 12 April 2022.
  5. ^ "Tokyo Olympics 2021 Live: India vs Australia women's hockey quarterfinal underway". The Times of India. Retrieved 2 August 2021.
  6. ^ Livemint (4 August 2021). "Tokyo Olympics: India women lose hockey semi-final 1–2 to Argentina". mint. Retrieved 6 August 2021.
  7. ^ Aug 2021, Times Now | 06; Ist, 09:18 Am. "Tokyo Olympics 2020: Indian women's hockey team lose 3–4 to Great Britain in Bronze-medal match". The Economic Times. Retrieved 6 August 2021.
  8. ^ a b "2002 Manchester: The XVII Commonwealth Games". 2002 Manchester: The XVII Commonwealth Games. 2002. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016.
  9. ^ Pandey, Vineeta (15 February 2004). "Indian Sportswomen: Still the Second Sex". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 26 February 2012. Retrieved 12 April 2008.
  10. ^ "India clinches bronze in Asia Cup hockey". The Hindu. 27 September 2013. Archived from the original on 13 February 2014. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
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  12. ^ PTI (6 July 2015). "On the verge of Olympic qualification, Indian women's hockey team arrive to grand welcome". Firstpost. Archived from the original on 22 August 2015. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  13. ^ a b "Chak De Moment For India". India Today. 29 August 2015. Archived from the original on 18 February 2016. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  14. ^ Bhagvatula, Shrikant (29 August 2015). "Chak De: Indian women's hockey team qualifies for Rio Olympics". Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 29 August 2015. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  15. ^ Bose, Adrija (29 August 2015). "India Women's Hockey Team Bags Historic 2016 Rio Olympic Berth After 36 Years". Huffington Post India. Archived from the original on 30 August 2015. Retrieved 29 August 2015.
  16. ^ "Indian women stun Kiwis". BBC. 1 August 2002. Archived from the original on 27 January 2011. Retrieved 12 April 2008.
  17. ^ "India deny England gold". BBC. 3 August 2002. Archived from the original on 13 October 2007. Retrieved 12 April 2008.
  18. ^ "Indian eves win Commonwealth hockey gold". Rediff.com. 3 August 2002. Archived from the original on 17 January 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2008.
  19. ^ Zanane, Anant; Das, Suprita (13 March 2008). "Women's hockey hopes to deliver". Sports. NDTV. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 7 April 2008.
  20. ^ a b "Chak De: The real Kabir Khan?". Sports. NDTV. 31 October 2007. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 23 August 2015.
  21. ^ "Back to the goal post". The Hindu. 10 August 2007. Archived from the original on 19 February 2016. Retrieved 23 April 2008.
  22. ^ Shrikant, B (26 June 2007). "More than reel life; the story of truth, lies & a man called Mir". Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 17 February 2015. Retrieved 23 April 2008.
  23. ^ "They said I'd taken one lakh per goal ... people used to introduce me as Mr Negi of those seven goals". The Indian Express. 16 September 2007. Archived from the original on 19 February 2016. Retrieved 23 April 2008.
  24. ^ Kumar, Anuj (7 September 2007). "In the company of ideas". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 19 February 2016. Retrieved 23 April 2008.
  25. ^ Roy, Abhishek (18 August 2007). "Chak De! is not a documentary of my life". Hindustan Times/IANS. Retrieved 21 August 2015.
  26. ^ "Hockey India names 18-member Indian Women's Hockey Team for Commonwealth Games 2022". hockeyindia.org. Hockey India. 21 July 2022.

External links