I Don't Want to Go Home

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
I Don't Want to Go Home
SSJ I Don't Want to Go Home cover.png
Studio album by
ReleasedJune 7, 1976[1][2]
RecordedJanuary - March 1976[1]
StudioThe Record Plant, New York City
GenreRock
Length35:00
LabelEpic
ProducerSteven Van Zandt
Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes chronology
I Don't Want to Go Home
(1976)
This Time It's for Real
(1977)
Singles from I Don't Want to Go Home
  1. "I Don't Want to Go Home/The Fever"
    Released: June 1976 (US) / July 23, 1976 (UK)[3]
  2. "Got to Get You Off My Mind/It Ain't the Meat (It's the Motion)"
    Released: 1976 (Germany)
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic[4]
Christgau's Record GuideB[5]

I Don't Want to Go Home was the first album by seminal New Jersey rock/R&B band Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes. The work helped establish the basis of the Jersey Shore sound. It was produced and arranged by manager Steven Van Zandt, who also sang, played guitar, wrote the title song, and elicited the contribution of two compositions by Bruce Springsteen, who also wrote the liner notes.[6]

The album features two perennial Jukes standards, Steve Van Zandt's "I Don't Want to Go Home" and "The Fever" by Bruce Springsteen. There were a number of guest artists and duets, a tradition that continued in their next album, This Time It's for Real. The track "How Come You Treat Me So Bad" features a duet with Lee Dorsey, while "Broke Down Piece of Man" features a duet with Steven Van Zandt, "It Ain't the Meat (It's the Motion)" features a duet with Kenny 'Popeye' Pentifallo, and finally "You Mean So Much To Me" features a duet with Ronnie Spector.[7][8]

Track listing

  1. "I Don't Want to Go Home" (Steven Van Zandt) - 3:42
  2. "Got to Get You Off My Mind" (Solomon Burke, J.B. Moore) - 3:13
  3. "How Come You Treat Me So Bad" (Steven Van Zandt) - 3:23
  4. "The Fever" (Bruce Springsteen) - 5:06
  5. "Broke Down Piece of Man" (Steve Cropper, Joe Shamwell) - 3:28
  6. "Sweeter Than Honey" (Steven Van Zandt) - 3:33
  7. "Fanny Mae" (Waymon Glasco, Morris Levy, Clarence L. Lewis) - 3:22
  8. "It Ain't the Meat (It's the Motion)" (Henry Glover) - 2:46
  9. "I Choose to Sing the Blues" (Ray Charles, Billie Holiday) - 2:45
  10. "You Mean So Much to Me" (Bruce Springsteen) - 3:44

Personnel

Musicians

  • Southside Johnny – lead vocals, harmonica
  • Kenny 'Popeye' Pentifallo – drums, vocals (duet "It Ain't the Meat")
  • Kevin Kavanaugh – keyboards, vocals
  • Billy Rush – guitar
  • Alan Berger – bass
  • Carlo Novi - tenor saxophone
  • Steven Van Zandt – guitar, vocals (duet "Broke Down Piece of Man")
  • Clarence Clemons (credited as Selmon T. Sachs) - bass vocals ("The Fever")
  • Lee Dorsey - duet vocals ("How Come You Treat Me So Bad")
  • Ronnie Spector - duet vocals ("You Mean So Much To Me")
  • The Miami Horns:
    • Rick Gazda – trumpet (mute solo "It Ain't the Meat")
    • Deacon Earl Gardner - trumpet, witness
    • Bob Malach - tenor saxophone
    • Louie 'The Lover' Parenti – trombone
    • Bill Zacagni - baritone saxophone
  • Strings:
    • Charles Parker - violin
    • Robert Zelnick - violin
    • Naomi Anner - violin
    • Cathy Tait - violin
    • Nardo Poy - viola
    • Ken Dreyfus - viola
  • Revelation (background vocals on "The Fever"):

Production

  • Steven Van Zandt - producer
  • Jimmy Iovine - engineer
  • Dave Thoener - assistant engineer
  • Mitchel Funk - photography
  • Paula Scher - designer
  • Bud Copeland - stylist

Source:[8]

References

  1. ^ a b JACOBSON, CAROL (1 June 1976). "Springsteen Joins Lyon, Asbury Jukes At Broadcast". newspapers.com (page 13). The Daily Register. the-daily-register. Retrieved 3 March 2021.
  2. ^ Pachin, Marty (1976-06-06). "Record Previews" (Page 55). Asbury Park Press. newspapers.com. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  3. ^ "The Fever UK". 45cat.com. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  4. ^ Allmusic review
  5. ^ Christgau, Robert (1981). "Consumer Guide '70s: S". Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies. Ticknor & Fields. ISBN 089919026X. Retrieved March 13, 2019 – via robertchristgau.com.
  6. ^ Marsh, Dave (2004). Two Hearts. New York: Routledge. Retrieved 20 August 2019.
  7. ^ www.southsidejohnny.com
  8. ^ a b "asburyjukes.net". Archived from the original on 2010-07-10. Retrieved 2010-04-22.