Historical books

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The historical books are a division of Christian Bibles, grouping 12 (or in some denominations more) books of the Old Testament.[1] It includes[2] the Former Prophets from the Nevi'im and two of the ungrouped books of Ketuvim of the Hebrew Bible together with the Book of Ruth and the Book of Esther which in the Hebrew are both found in the Five Megillot. These 12 books make up the historical books in the Protestant Bible, but several other books not found in the Hebrew Bible are also included in Catholic and Orthodox Bibles (see the list below for details).

The books provide a history of the Israelites spanning nearly a millennium, from their conquest of Canaan until the return to Zion in 539 BCE. The historical books tell of the entry of the Israelites into the Promised Land after The Exodus, the leadership of the biblical judges, the establishment of the United Monarchy and its subsequent division into the northern Kingdom of Israel and southern Kingdom of Judah, and the Babylonian captivity.[3][4]

List

The historical books of the main Christian canons are as follows:[5]

  • Joshua
  • Judges
  • Ruth
  • Samuel, split in two in Christian Bibles:
  • Kings, split in two in Christian Bibles:
  • Chronicles, split in two in Christian Bibles:
  • Ezra (1 Esdras)
  • Nehemiah (2 Esdras)
  • Tobit (only included in the Catholic and Orthodox canons)
  • Judith (only included in the Catholic and Orthodox canons)
  • Esther
  • Some of the Books of the Maccabees:
    • 1 Maccabees (only included in the Catholic and Orthodox canons)
    • 2 Maccabees (only included in the Catholic and Orthodox canons)
    • 3 Maccabees (only included in the Orthodox canons)
    • 4 Maccabees (Protestant, Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox Churches consider it noncanonical. The Catholic Trent Council and the Eastern Orthodox Quintsext Council exclude it, but Greek Orthodox and Georgian Orthodox Bibles have included it in their pages without officially considering it canonical.)
  • 3 Esdras ("3 Esdras" in Russian Bibles correspond to "4 Esdras" in Vulgate Bibles. Russian and Georgian Bibles often include it, but their Churches consider it noncanonical based on the Eastern Orthodox Quintsext Council. The Protestant and Catholic Churches also consider it noncanonical.)

See also

References

  1. ^ Vincent P. Branick (2011). Understanding the Historical Books of the Old Testament. Paulist Press. ISBN 978-0809147281.
  2. ^ Vincent P. Branick (2011). Understanding the Historical Books of the Old Testament. Paulist Press. ISBN 978-0809147281.
  3. ^ Bible.org - 4. The Historical Books
  4. ^ Learn Religions - Historical Books
  5. ^ Introduction to the Historical Books: Strategies for Reading - In Search of the Historical Books


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