Chen Hsuan-yu

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Chen Hsuan-yu
陈煊渝
Personal information
CountryAustralia
Born (1993-06-01) 1 June 1993 (age 29)
Taichung, Taiwan[1]
ResidenceBrisbane, Queensland, Australia[1]
Height1.67 m (5 ft 6 in)[2]
Weight60 kg (132 lb)[2]
HandednessRight[1]
Women's singles
Highest ranking55 (26 November 2015)
Current ranking72 (3 May 2022)
Medal record
Women's badminton
Representing  Australia
Oceania Championships
Gold medal – first place 2015 North Harbour Women's singles
Gold medal – first place 2016 Papeete Women's singles
Gold medal – first place 2017 Nouméa Women's singles
Gold medal – first place 2018 Hamilton Women's singles
Gold medal – first place 2019 Melbourne Women's singles
Gold medal – first place 2020 Ballarat Women's singles
Gold medal – first place 2022 Melbourne Women's singles
Bronze medal – third place 2015 North Harbour Women's doubles
Bronze medal – third place 2017 Nouméa Mixed doubles
Oceania Mixed Team Championships
Gold medal – first place 2019 Melbourne Mixed team
Oceania Women's Team Championships
Gold medal – first place 2018 Hamilton Women's team
Gold medal – first place 2020 Ballarat Women's team
BWF profile

Wendy Chen Hsuan-yu (Traditional Chinese: 陳煊渝; born 1 June 1993) is an Australian badminton player who has represented her country at the 2016 Rio and 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games.[3][4][5]

Career

Badminton was the family sport and all of Chen's family played. She excelled in her high school years and represented her school in both junior and senior Badminton events. She then turned professional and made her International debut for badminton in 2012.

At the 2016 Rio Olympics, Chen made her Olympic debut representing Australia. Her opponents were Thailand's Porntip Buranaprasertsuk and Mauritius' Kate Foo Kune and in spite of a good contest she lost to both.[6]

In 2017, Chen won the Casa Del Sole Noumea International. In 2018, she represented Australia at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia.[2] In early 2020, she won the women's singles titles at the Oceania Championships in six consecutive years from 2015–2020.[7]

Chen played at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, and was knocked out in the group stage after finishing second in her group.[8]

Achievements

Oceania Championships

Women's singles

Year Venue Opponent Score Result Ref
2015 X-TRM North Harbour Badminton Centre, North Harbour, New Zealand Australia Joy Lai 21–18, 24–22 Gold Gold [9]
2016 Punaauia University Hall, Papeete, Tahiti Australia Joy Lai 21–13, 21–15 Gold Gold [10]
2017 Salle Anewy, Nouméa, New Caledonia Australia Tiffany Ho 21–18, 21–11 Gold Gold [11]
2018 Eastlink Badminton Stadium, Hamilton, New Zealand Australia Louisa Ma 21–7, 21–14 Gold Gold [12]
2019 Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre, Melbourne, Australia Australia Yingzi Jiang 17–21, 21–16, 23–21 Gold Gold [13]
2020 Ken Kay Badminton Stadium, Ballarat, Australia Australia Louisa Ma 21–15, 21–11 Gold Gold [7]
2022 Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre, Melbourne, Australia Australia Louisa Ma 21–17, 21–18 Gold Gold [14]

Women's doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result Ref
2015 X-TRM North Harbour Badminton Centre,
North Harbour, New Zealand
Australia Louisa Ma Australia Leanne Choo
Australia Gronya Somerville
18–21, 16–21 Bronze Bronze [15]

Mixed doubles

Year Venue Partner Opponent Score Result Ref
2017 Salle Anewy,
Nouméa, New Caledonia
Australia Mitchell Wheller Australia Joel Findlay
Australia Gronya Somerville
12–21, 19–21 Bronze Bronze [16]

BWF International Challenge/Series (1 title, 5 runners-up)

Women's singles

Year Tournament Opponent Score Result Ref
2015 Maribyrnong International Malaysia Julia Wong Pei Xian 22–20, 19–21, 14–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [17]
2016 Waikato International Vietnam Vũ Thị Trang 12–21, 15–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [18]
2017 Nouméa International Australia Joy Lai 21–16, 21–9 1st place, gold medalist(s) Winner [19]

Women's doubles

Year Tournament Partner Opponent Score Result Ref
2015 Maribyrnong International Chinese Taipei Lin Shu-yu Australia Setyana Mapasa
Australia Gronya Somerville
22–20, 17–21, 18–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [17]
2017 Sydney International Australia Sylvina Kurniawan Chinese Taipei Hung En-tzu
Chinese Taipei Lin Jhih-yun
19–21, 19–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [20]
2021 Irish Open Australia Gronya Somerville Netherlands Debora Jille
Netherlands Cheryl Seinen
21–15, 14–21, 14–21 2nd place, silver medalist(s) Runner-up [21]
  BWF International Challenge tournament
  BWF International Series tournament
  BWF Future Series tournament

References

  1. ^ a b c "Chen Hsuan-Yu Wendy". International Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on 19 July 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  2. ^ a b c "Participants: Hsuan-yu Wendy Chen". Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games. Archived from the original on 13 June 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  3. ^ "Hsuan-Yu Wendy Chen". Badminton World Federation. Retrieved 7 August 2016.
  4. ^ "Hsuan Chen". Official Site of the 2016 Australian Olympic Team. Australian Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on 3 September 2016. Retrieved 7 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Hsuan-Yu Chen". Australian Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on 19 July 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  6. ^ "Hsuan-Yu Chen". Australian Olympic Committee. Retrieved 9 October 2021.
  7. ^ a b Palmer, Dan (12 February 2020). "Chen's six of the best as Manota and Somerville win two golds at Oceania Badminton Championships". Inside the Games. Retrieved 15 February 2020.
  8. ^ "Australian Olympic Team for Tokyo 2021". The Roar. Retrieved 9 October 2021.
  9. ^ Rin, Kira (16 February 2015). "Oceania Champs 2015 Finals – 2 for Choo, all for Oz". Badzine. Archived from the original on 16 February 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  10. ^ Hearn, Don (30 April 2016). "Oceania Champs – Australians sweep rain-delayed finals". Badzine. Archived from the original on 1 May 2016. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  11. ^ Sukumar, Dev (16 February 2017). "Serasinghe, Mapasa Claim Double – Victor Oceania Championships 2017: Finals". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 15 March 2018. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  12. ^ Sukumar, Dev (12 February 2018). "Manota, Chen Emerge Champions – Finals: Victor Oceania Championships 2018". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 12 February 2018. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  13. ^ Sukumar, Dev (21 February 2019). "Finals Results – Victor Oceania Open Individual Championships 2019". Badminton Oceania. Archived from the original on 11 July 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  14. ^ "Oceania Championships: Wendy Chen's Reign Continues". Badminton Oceania. 1 May 2022. Archived from the original on 1 May 2022. Retrieved 4 May 2022 – via Badminton World Federation.
  15. ^ Sukumar, Dev (14 February 2015). "X-TRM Oceania Championships 2015 – Day 3: Leydon-Davis In Sight of Double". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 15 March 2018. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  16. ^ Sukumar, Dev (15 February 2017). "Five in Line for Double - Victor Oceania Championships 2017: Semi-finals". Badminton World Federation. Archived from the original on 16 February 2017. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  17. ^ a b "2015 Victor Maribyrnong International". BWF-Tournament Software. Archived from the original on 19 July 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  18. ^ Goile, Aaron (21 March 2016). "Overseas players show their class at Waikato International badminton event". Stuff. Archived from the original on 26 August 2017. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  19. ^ "Clean Sweep for Australia in Casa Del Sole Noumea International". Badminton Oceania. 13 February 2017. Archived from the original on 10 July 2021. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  20. ^ Wong, Aaron (10 September 2017). "Sydney Int'l – 11-year wait for 2nd title". Badzine. Archived from the original on 10 September 2017. Retrieved 19 July 2021.
  21. ^ Gonzalez Martinez, Sara (22 November 2021). "An Irish Open with a Dutch golden touch". Badminton Europe. Archived from the original on 22 November 2021. Retrieved 4 May 2022.

External links

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