Big Green (non-profit company)

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Big Green
Established22 February 2011 Edit this on Wikidata (11 years ago)
Typesnonprofit organization Edit this on Wikidata
Legal status501(c)(3) organization Edit this on Wikidata
HeadquartersBroomfield Edit this on Wikidata
CountryUnited States Edit this on Wikidata
Websitebiggreen.org Edit this on Wikidata


Big Green is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that was started in 2011 by Kimbal Musk and his partner in The Kitchen restaurant group, Hugo Matheson, with the belief that every child should have the opportunity to play, learn and grow in healthy communities.[1] A combination of playground and outdoor classroom, the learning gardens are spaces where learners discover and get trained on the science of growing fruits and vegetables.[2][3] It aims to enhance students' health and improve communities through the creation of practical learning, garden-based education opportunities.[4]

Beginnings

Big Green was established in 2011 by Kimbal Musk and Hugo Matheson. School gardens helping boost school children’s fondness for healthy foods is the core idea that led to its establishment. These gardens were conceptualized to assist children in building up better responses to pressures and anxieties and improve learners' academic performance.[5] Its founders intend Big Green to be replicated in other schools and generate a range of school-related solutions. The first learning garden was constructed in Denver, Colorado at Schmitt Elementary.[citation needed]

Learning gardens

A “learning garden” is an out-of-doors classroom that also serves as a productive garden of plants fit for eating. It is composed of modular, raised beds with seating and shade, providing space for teaching and learning. These gardens are designed to become mediums for comprehensive mindset change regarding child nourishment, socialization and student achievement.[6][7] They are also designed to go well with any type of school structure, whether it has extensive fields surrounding it or it only has an undersized rooftop.[8]

The food harvested from the learning gardens are sold to restaurants. The activity aims to teach students to become young entrepreneurs and acquire business abilities.[citation needed]

Accusations of union busting

Big Green has been accused of illegally discriminating against and firing employees who were organizing labor unions at the organization.[9]

References

  1. ^ cookwjennifer. "Plant A Seed Day: Celebrate spring and take a step toward a healthier future". The Commercial Appeal. Retrieved 2019-08-22.
  2. ^ Kim Severson, "Kimbal Musk Wants to Feed America, Silicon Valley-Style," 16 October 2017. Retrieved 7 October 2018 from https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/16/dining/kimbal-musk-food.html
  3. ^ Leanna Garfield, “Kimbal Musk — Elon’s brother — is leading a $25 million mission to fix food in schools across the US,” 17 January 2018. Retrieved 4 October 2018 from https://www.businessinsider.com/kimbal-musks-food-nonprofit-goes-national-learning-gardens-schools-2018-1
  4. ^ Tom Oder, "Kimbal Musk's garden dream is growing," 24 January 2018. Retrieved 4 October 2018 from https://www.mnn.com/your-home/organic-farming-gardening/stories/big-green-kimball-musk-kitchen-community-national
  5. ^ Lewis Lazare, "My breakfast with Kimbal Musk, Elon's brother," 9 November 2017. Retrieved 7 October 2018 from https://www.bizjournals.com/chicago/news/2017/11/09/my-breakfast-with-kimbal-musk-elons-brother.html
  6. ^ "About Learning Gardens – Big Green". biggreen.org. Retrieved 2018-10-06.
  7. ^ America Succeeds. Retrieved 8 October 2018 fromhttp://www.americasucceeds.org/downloads/edventure/kimbal.pdf[permanent dead link]
  8. ^ Jane Black, “This is how Learning Gardens grow,” 18 September 2012. Retrieved 8 October 2018 from https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/this-is-how-learning-gardens-grow/2012/09/18/94322aca-fcff-11e1-b153-218509a954e1_story.html
  9. ^ Brown, H. Claire. "Kimbal Musk's school gardening nonprofit lays off entire unionizing workforce". The Counter. Retrieved 1 December 2021.

External links