2022 World Athletics Championships

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World Athletics Championships
Oregon 2022
2022 World Athletics Championships logo 2.svg
Host cityEugene, Oregon
MottoFeel the Glory
Organizer(s)World Athletics, USATF
Edition18th
Nations participating179+1 [1]
Athletes participating1,700+
Sport(s)Athletics
Events49 + 1 team
Dates15–24 July 2022
Officially opened byDoug Emhoff
Main venueHayward Field
Individual prize money (US$)70,000
Team prize money (US$)80,000
WebsiteOregon22

The 2022 World Athletics Championships was the eighteenth edition of the World Athletics Championships. It was held at Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon, United States, from July 15–24, 2022.[2][3][4] The competition was originally scheduled for August 6–15, 2021, but it was postponed by one year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

After the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, World Athletics banned all Russian and Belarusian athletes and officials from participating at the championships. In addition, the stringent vaccination requirements for people entering the United States caused visa delays for participants and officials, with some ultimately being unable to enter the country.[5][6] These issues caused the final total to stand at 179 nations (180 including the Athlete Refugee Team), the lowest number since Tokyo 1991.

A record 29 countries won at least one gold medal during the championships. Peru, Kazakhstan, and Nigeria won their first-ever gold medals. India and Burkina Faso had their best medal performances, winning a silver, and the Philippines won a bronze. A new award was the team event trophy,[7] which was won by the United States, which also won the second-most gold medals, with 13, and the most medals overall, with 33 (a record for a single edition). The event was the most-watched edition ever in US television history.[8] More than 146,000 tickets were sold, with several evening sessions sold out.[9]

There were four athletes who won two gold medals: Kimberly García in the Women's 20km Race Walk and the Women's 35km Race Walk; Michael Norman in the Men's 400m and the Men's 4x400m Relay; Sydney McLaughlin in the Women's 400m Hurdles and the Women's 4x400m Relay; and Abby Steiner in the Women's 4x100m Relay and Women's 4x400m Relay. In addition to the athletes who won two gold medals, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce and Shericka Jackson both of Jamaica, earned 3 medals, 1 gold and 2 silvers in the Women's 100m (Fraser-Pryce gold; Jackson silver), the Women's 200 metres (Jackson gold; Fraser-Pryce silver) and the Women's 4x100m Relay (silver for both).

Three world records and 13 championship records were broken. The world records were set by Sydney McLaughlin, who ran 50.68 seconds in the Women's 400m Hurdles final; Tobi Amusan, who won the Women's 100m Hurdles semi-final in 12.12 seconds; and Armand Duplantis, who reached 6.21 meters in the Men's Pole Vault final.

Host selection and venue

The selection of the host city was announced on April 16, 2015 in Beijing, China.[10][11] Eugene was selected without a traditional bidding process, though Eugene did put in a bid for the 2019 World Championships, losing out to Doha.

Runner's World magazine reported that Eugene's selection by World Athletics, then known as the International Association of Athletics Federations, was an "unusual move".[2] They report the Association "bypassed the usual bidding process," and that the choice of Eugene would make the 2022 event "the first held in the United States." The event was the second held in North America, after Edmonton in 2001.

The Guardian reported that the lack of bidding triggered concern in European cities that had bid to host the event.[4] They quoted Lamine Diack, IAAF president, who justified the lack of bidding with the claim the selection of Eugene to host the event, "enables us to take advantage of a unique opportunity to host a financially successful tournament that may never arise again."

Despite this, the 2022 event was not the first to lack the usual bidding process: as the 2007 World Championships were awarded to Osaka without bidding after the withdrawal of the two other candidate cities.

Venue

Hayward Field in 2007, prior to 2018-2020 renovation

The championships were held at the University of Oregon Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon, which has 12,650 permanent seats and a temporary capacity of 25,000. The venue had previously hosted the 2020 USA Olympic Track and Field Trials, the 2021 and 2022 NCAA Division I Outdoor Track Field Championships and the 2022 USA Outdoor Track and Field Championships. The track, installed in 2021, was manufactured by Beynon Sports.[12]

The race walking was held on a 1-km loop on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, near Autzen Stadium, and the marathon race started from the same stadium, towards Pre's Trail and going to Springfield, Oregon and back.[13]

Results

Men

Track

Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 metres
details
Fred Kerley
 United States
9.86 Marvin Bracy
 United States
9.88 Trayvon Bromell
 United States
9.88
200 metres
details
Noah Lyles
 United States
19.31 WL, NR Kenny Bednarek
 United States
19.77 SB Erriyon Knighton
 United States
19.80
400 metres
details
Michael Norman
 United States
44.29 Kirani James
 Grenada
44.48 Matthew Hudson-Smith
 Great Britain and Northern Ireland
44.66
800 metres
details
Emmanuel Korir
 Kenya
1:43.71 SB Djamel Sedjati
 Algeria
1:44.14 Marco Arop
 Canada
1:44.28
1500 metres
details
Jake Wightman
 Great Britain and Northern Ireland
3:29.23 WL, PB Jakob Ingebrigtsen
 Norway
3:29.47 SB Mohamed Katir
 Spain
3:29.90 SB
5000 metres
details
Jakob Ingebrigtsen
 Norway
13:09.24 Jacob Krop
 Kenya
13:09.98 Oscar Chelimo
 Uganda
13:10.20 SB
10,000 metres
details
Joshua Cheptegei
 Uganda
27:27.43 SB Stanley Mburu
 Kenya
27:27.90 SB Jacob Kiplimo
 Uganda
27:27.97 SB
Marathon
details
Tamirat Tola
 Ethiopia
2:05:36 CR Mosinet Geremew
 Ethiopia
2:06:44 Bashir Abdi
 Belgium
2:06:48
110 metres hurdles
details
Grant Holloway
 United States
13.03 Trey Cunningham
 United States
13.08 Asier Martínez
 Spain
13.17 PB
400 metres hurdles
details
Alison dos Santos
 Brazil
46.29 CR, AR, WL Rai Benjamin
 United States
46.89 SB Trevor Bassitt
 United States
47.39 PB
3000 metres steeplechase
details
Soufiane El Bakkali
 Morocco
8:25.13 Lamecha Girma
 Ethiopia
8:26.01 Conseslus Kipruto
 Kenya
8:27.92
20 kilometres walk
details
Toshikazu Yamanishi
 Japan
1:19:07 Koki Ikeda
 Japan
1:19:14 Perseus Karlström
 Sweden
1:19:18
35 kilometres walk
details
Massimo Stano
 Italy
2:23:14 CR, NR Masatora Kawano
 Japan
2:23:15 AR Perseus Karlström
 Sweden
2:23:44 PB
4 × 100 metres relay
details
 Canada
Aaron Brown
Jerome Blake
Brendon Rodney
Andre De Grasse
37.48 WL, NR  United States
Christian Coleman
Noah Lyles
Elijah Hall
Marvin Bracy
37.55 SB  Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Jona Efoloko
Zharnel Hughes
Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake
Reece Prescod
Adam Gemili*
37.83 SB
4 × 400 metres relay
details
 United States
Elija Godwin
Michael Norman
Bryce Deadmon
Champion Allison
Vernon Norwood*
Trevor Bassitt*
2:56.17 WL  Jamaica
Akeem Bloomfield
Nathon Allen
Jevaughn Powell
Christopher Taylor
Karayme Bartley*
Anthony Cox*
2:58.58  Belgium
Dylan Borlée
Julien Watrin
Alexander Doom
Kevin Borlée
Jonathan Sacoor*
2:58.72
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

* Indicates the athletes only competed in the preliminary heats and received medals

Field

Event Gold Silver Bronze
High jump
details
Mutaz Essa Barshim
 Qatar
2.37 m WL Woo Sang-hyeok
 South Korea
2.35 m NR Andriy Protsenko
 Ukraine
2.33 m SB
Pole vault
details
Armand Duplantis
 Sweden
6.21 m WR Chris Nilsen
 United States
5.94 m Ernest John Obiena
 Philippines
5.94 m AR
Long jump
details
Wang Jianan
 China
8.36 m SB Miltiadis Tentoglou
 Greece
8.32 m Simon Ehammer
 Switzerland
8.16 m
Triple jump
details
Pedro Pichardo
 Portugal
17.95 m WL Hugues Fabrice Zango
 Burkina Faso
17.55 m SB Zhu Yaming
 China
17.31 m SB
Shot put
details
Ryan Crouser
 United States
22.94 m CR Joe Kovacs
 United States
22.89 m SB Josh Awotunde
 United States
22.29 m PB
Discus throw
details
Kristjan Čeh
 Slovenia
71.13 m CR Mykolas Alekna
 Lithuania
69.27 m Andrius Gudžius
 Lithuania
67.55 m
Javelin throw
details
Anderson Peters
 Grenada
90.54 m Neeraj Chopra
 India
88.13 m Jakub Vadlejch
 Czech Republic
88.09 m
Hammer throw
details
Paweł Fajdek
 Poland
81.98 m WL Wojciech Nowicki
 Poland
81.03 m Eivind Henriksen
 Norway
80.87 m SB
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Combined

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Decathlon
details
Kevin Mayer
 France
8816 SB Pierce LePage
 Canada
8701 PB Zach Ziemek
 United States
8676 PB
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Women

Track

Event Gold Silver Bronze
100 metres
details
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
 Jamaica
10.67 CR, =WL Shericka Jackson
 Jamaica
10.73 PB Elaine Thompson-Herah
 Jamaica
10.81
200 metres
details
Shericka Jackson
 Jamaica
21.45 CR, NR, WL Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
 Jamaica
21.81 SB Dina Asher-Smith
 Great Britain and Northern Ireland
22.02
400 metres
details
Shaunae Miller-Uibo
 Bahamas
49.11 WL Marileidy Paulino
 Dominican Republic
49.60 Sada Williams
 Barbados
49.75 NR
800 metres
details
Athing Mu
 United States
1:56.30 WL Keely Hodgkinson
 Great Britain and Northern Ireland
1:56.38 SB Mary Moraa
 Kenya
1:56.71 PB
1500 metres
details
Faith Kipyegon
 Kenya
3:52.96 Gudaf Tsegay
 Ethiopia
3:54.52 Laura Muir
 Great Britain and Northern Ireland
3:55.28 SB
5000 metres
details
Gudaf Tsegay
 Ethiopia
14:46.29 Beatrice Chebet
 Kenya
14:46.75 SB Dawit Seyaum
 Ethiopia
14:47.36
10,000 metres
details
Letesenbet Gidey
 Ethiopia
30:09.94 WL Hellen Obiri
 Kenya
30:10.02 PB Margaret Kipkemboi
 Kenya
30:10.07 PB
Marathon
details
Gotytom Gebreslase
 Ethiopia
02:18:11 CR Judith Korir
 Kenya
02:18:20 PB Lonah Salpeter
 Israel
02:20:18
100 metres hurdles
details
Tobi Amusan
 Nigeria
12.06 w Britany Anderson
 Jamaica
12.23 w Jasmine Camacho-Quinn
 Puerto Rico
12.23 w
400 metres hurdles
details
Sydney McLaughlin
 United States
50.68 WR Femke Bol
 Netherlands
52.27 SB Dalilah Muhammad
 United States
53.13 SB
3000 metres steeplechase
details
Norah Jeruto
 Kazakhstan
8:53.02 CR, WL Werkuha Getachew
 Ethiopia
8:54.61 NR Mekides Abebe
 Ethiopia
8:56.08 PB
20 kilometres walk
details
Kimberly García
 Peru
1:26:58 NR Katarzyna Zdziebło
 Poland
1:27.31 NR Qieyang Shijie
 China
1:27:56
35 kilometres walk
details
Kimberly García
 Peru
2:39:16 CR, AR Katarzyna Zdziebło
 Poland
2:40.03 PB Qieyang Shijie
 China
2:40:37 AR
4 × 100 metres relay
details
 United States
Melissa Jefferson
Abby Steiner
Jenna Prandini
Twanisha Terry
Aleia Hobbs*
41.14 WL  Jamaica
Kemba Nelson
Elaine Thompson-Herah
Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce
Shericka Jackson
Briana Williams*
Natalliah Whyte*
Remona Burchell*
41.18 SB  Germany
Tatjana Pinto
Alexandra Burghardt
Gina Lückenkemper
Rebekka Haase
42.03 SB
4 × 400 metres relay
details
 United States
Talitha Diggs
Abby Steiner
Britton Wilson
Sydney McLaughlin
Allyson Felix*
Kaylin Whitney*
Jaide Stepter Baynes*
3:17.79 WL  Jamaica
Candice McLeod
Janieve Russell
Stephenie Ann McPherson
Charokee Young
Stacey-Ann Williams*
Junelle Bromfield*
Tiffany James*
3:20.74 SB  Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Victoria Ohuruogu
Nicole Yeargin
Jessie Knight
Laviai Nielsen
Ama Pipi*
3:22.64 SB
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

* Indicates the athletes only competed in the preliminary heats and received medals

Field

Event Gold Silver Bronze
High jump
details
Eleanor Patterson
 Australia
2.02 m =AR Yaroslava Mahuchikh
 Ukraine
2.02 m Elena Vallortigara
 Italy
2.00 m SB
Pole vault
details
Katie Nageotte
 United States
4.85 m WL Sandi Morris
 United States
4.85 m WL Nina Kennedy
 Australia
4.80 m SB
Long jump
details
Malaika Mihambo
 Germany
7.12 m SB Ese Brume
 Nigeria
7.02 m SB Leticia Oro Melo
 Brazil
6.89 m PB
Triple jump
details
Yulimar Rojas
 Venezuela
15.47 m WL Shanieka Ricketts
 Jamaica
14.89 m SB Tori Franklin
 United States
14.72 m SB
Shot put
details
Chase Ealey
 United States
20.49 m Gong Lijiao
 China
20.39 m Jessica Schilder
 Netherlands
19.77 m
Discus throw
details
Feng Bin
 China
69.12 m PB Sandra Perković
 Croatia
68.45 m SB Valarie Allman
 United States
68.30 m
Javelin throw
details
Kelsey-Lee Barber
 Australia
66.91 m WL Kara Winger
 United States
64.05 m Haruka Kitaguchi
 Japan
63.27 m
Hammer throw
details
Brooke Andersen
 United States
78.96 Camryn Rogers
 Canada
75.52 Janee' Kassanavoid
 United States
74.86
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Combined

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Heptathlon
details
Nafissatou Thiam
 Belgium
6947 WL Anouk Vetter
 Netherlands
6867 NR Anna Hall
 United States
6755 PB
WR world record | AR area record | CR championship record | GR games record | NR national record | OR Olympic record | PB personal best | SB season best | WL world leading (in a given season)

Mixed

Event Gold Silver Bronze
4 × 400 metres relay
details
 Dominican Republic
Lidio Andrés Feliz
Marileidy Paulino
Alexander Ogando
Fiordaliza Cofil
3:09.82 WL  Netherlands
Liemarvin Bonevacia
Lieke Klaver
Tony van Diepen
Femke Bol
Eveline Saalberg*
3:09.90 NR  United States
Elija Godwin
Allyson Felix
Vernon Norwood
Kennedy Simon
Wadeline Jonathas*
3:10.16 SB

* Indicates the athletes only competed in the preliminary heats and received medals

World Team

Event Gold Silver Bronze
World Team
details
 United States (USA) 328 pts  Jamaica (JAM) 110 pts  Ethiopia (ETH) 106 pts

Medal table

  *   Host nation (United States)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 United States*1391133
2 Ethiopia44210
3 Jamaica27110
4 Kenya25310
5 China2136
6 Australia2013
7 Peru2002
8 Poland1304
9 Canada1214
 Japan1214
11 Great Britain and Northern Ireland1157
12 Norway1113
13 Dominican Republic1102
 Grenada1102
 Nigeria1102
16 Belgium1023
 Sweden1023
 Uganda1023
19 Brazil1012
 Germany1012
 Italy1012
22 Bahamas1001
 France1001
 Kazakhstan1001
 Morocco1001
 Portugal1001
 Qatar1001
 Slovenia1001
 Venezuela1001
30 Netherlands0314
31 Lithuania0112
 Ukraine0112
33 Algeria0101
 Burkina Faso0101
 Croatia0101
 Greece0101
 India0101
 South Korea0101
39 Spain0022
40 Barbados0011
 Czech Republic0011
 Israel0011
 Philippines0011
 Puerto Rico0011
 Switzerland0011
Totals (45 nations)494949147

Placing table

Entry standards

World Athletics announced that athletes would qualify by their World Athletics Rankings position, wild card (reigning world champion or 2021 Diamond League winner) or by achieving the entry standard.[14]

To qualify as a Wild Card you had to be one of the following things:

Countries who had no male and/or no female athletes who had achieved the Entry Standard or considered as having achieved the entry standard (see above) or a qualified relay team, could enter one unqualified male athlete OR one unqualified female athlete in one event of the championships (except the road events and field events, combined events, 10,000 m and 3000 m steeplechase).

Event Men Quota Women Quota
100 metres 10.05 48 11.15 48
200 metres 20.24 56 22.80 56
400 metres 44.90 48 51.35 48
800 metres 1:45.20 48 1:59.50 48
1500 metres 3:35.00 45 4:04.20 45
5000 metres 13:13.50 42 15:10.00 42
10,000 metres 27:28.00 27 31:25.00 27
Marathon 2:11:30 100 2:29:30 100
3000 metres steeplechase 8:22.00 45 9:30.00 45
110/100 metres hurdles 13.32 40 12.84 40
400 metres hurdles 48.90 40 55.40 40
High jump 2.33 32 1.96 32
Pole vault 5.80 32 4.70 32
Long jump 8.22 32 6.82 32
Triple jump 17.14 32 14.32 32
Shot put 21.10 32 18.50 32
Discus throw 66.00 32 63.50 32
Hammer throw 77.50 32 72.50 32
Javelin throw 85.00 32 64.00 32
Decathlon/Heptathlon 8350 24 6420 24
20 kilometres race walk 1:21:00 60 1:31:00 60
35 kilometers race walk 2:33:00 (3:50:00 for 50 km) 60 2:54:00 (4:25:00 for 50 km) 60
4 × 100 metres relay Top 10 at the 2021 World Athletics Relays
+ 6 from Top Lists
16 Top 10 at the 2021 World Athletics Relays
+ 6 from Top Lists
16
4 × 400 metres relay Top 10 at the 2021 World Athletics Relays
+ 6 from Top Lists
16 Top 10 at the 2021 World Athletics Relays
+ 6 from Top Lists
16
4 × 400 metres relay mixed Top 12 at the 2021 World Athletics Relays
+ 4 from Top Lists
16 Top 12 at the 2021 World Athletics Relays
+ 4 from Top Lists
16

Target numbers

At the end of the qualification period, the 2021 World Athletics Rankings were published. They were used to invite additional athletes to the World Championships where the target number of athletes had not been achieved for that event through other methods of qualification.

The maximum of three athletes per country in individual events was not affected by this rule. Member federations retained the right to confirm or reject athlete selections through this method.

Where the highest ranked athletes were from a country that already had three entrants for the event, or where member federations had rejected an entrant, the next highest ranked athlete became eligible for entry via the world rankings.

Area Champions

The following regulations shall applied for Automatic Qualification to the 2022 World Athletics Championships (not applicable for relays and marathon).
1. The Area Champion (in each individual event to be contested at the World Championships) automatically qualifies for the World Championships, irrespective of whether his performance has reached the Entry Standard. This does not apply to 10,000 m, 3000 m Steeplechase, Combined Events, Field Events and Road Events where the entry of the athlete will be subject to the approval of the Technical Delegates
2. The Area Champion shall be the one who has achieved the title either in 2020, 2021 or 2022
3. The Member Federation of the Area Champion will have the ultimate authority to enter the athlete or not, based on its own domestic standard or qualification system
4. If the Member Federation of the Area Champion enters the athlete, he will be considered as having achieved the Entry Standard
5. If the Area Champion, for whatever reason, is not entered, his quota will not be delegated to the second placed athlete and the normal entry rules and conditions apply
6. For those Area Championships that do not have certain events, the Area Associations can organize alternate Area-specific event Championships with conditions conforming to Area Championships Regulations. World Athletics shall be notified of such alternative Championships at least one month in advance of the events being held

Schedule

Participating nations

The 1500 meter final at the 2022 World Athletics Championship at Hayward Field, Eugene, Oregon

1,972 athletes from 192 member federations were scheduled to compete at the championships,[16] but owing to vaccination requirements and visa issues the final total was reduced to 179 nations (plus the Athlete Refugee Team) and more than 1,700 athletes, the lowest number since 1991 for the former and 2005 for the latter.[1]

A record 29 countries won at least one gold medal during the championships. Peru, Kazakhstan, and Nigeria won their first-ever gold medals, while India and Burkina Faso had their best medal performances, with silver, and the Philippines with bronze.[1][17]

Prize money

There was a world record programme where if a world record was broken the athlete who broke it would get $100,000.

A total amount of $8,498,000 was also offered by World Athletics to finalists at Oregon 2022, of which $2 million has been ringfenced from the fines paid by the Russian Athletics Federation (for doping rules offenses).[19]

The prize money is as follows:

Individual events
  • Gold: $70,000
  • Silver: $35,000
  • Bronze: $22,000
  • Fourth place: $16,000
  • Fifth place: $11,000
  • Sixth place: $7,000
  • Seventh place: $6,000
  • Eighth place: $5,000
Relays (per each team)
  • Gold: $80,000
  • Silver: $40,000
  • Bronze: $20,000
  • Fourth place: $16,000
  • Fifth place: $12,000
  • Sixth place: $8,000
  • Seventh place: $6,000
  • Eighth place: $4,000

Media coverage

The event was streamed live in some territories on the World Athletics YouTube and Facebook channels. [20]

The event was the most watched World Athletics Championships in US television history, reaching an excess of 13.7 million viewers.[21]

International broadcasters

  • Arena Sport: Bosnia, Croatia, Kosovo,North Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Slovenia
  • beIN Sports: MENA Region
  • ESPN International: Latin America (except Brazil)
  • NBC Sports: Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands and United States[22]
  • Sportv: Brazil
  • SuperSport, TVMS: Pan Sub-Saharan Africa
  • TV Jamaica: Pan Caribbean
  • TyC Sports: Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela (except Brazil)

National broadcasters

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c "Record number of countries win gold at World Athletics Championships Oregon22". World Athletics. July 25, 2022. Retrieved July 25, 2022.
  2. ^ a b Monti, David (April 16, 2015). "Eugene to Host 2021 Track World Championships: Oregon City will be first U.S. site of global meet". Runner's World. Archived from the original on December 1, 2017. Retrieved August 28, 2015. In an unusual move that bypassed the usual bidding process, the International Association of Athletics Federations awarded Eugene, Oregon, the 2021 World Championships in Athletics in a special vote on the second day of their Council Meeting in Beijing
  3. ^ Clarey, Christopher (April 16, 2015). "Without Bidding, Eugene, Ore., Is Abruptly Awarded World Track Championships". New York Times. p. B12. Retrieved August 29, 2015. There was surprise in multiple time zones on Thursday when Eugene, Ore., became the first city in the United States to secure the world outdoor track and field championships. It will stage them in 2021 without the usual constraint of having had to win a formal bidding process(subscription required)
  4. ^ a b "IAAF under fire for awarding 2021 World Athletics Championships to Eugene". The Guardian. Associated Press. April 16, 2015. Retrieved August 29, 2015.
  5. ^ Phillips, Mitch (July 15, 2022). "World Championship organisers scrambling to fix visa issues". Reuters. Retrieved July 20, 2022.
  6. ^ Rowbottom, Mike (July 15, 2022). "Visa delays for Oregon22 affecting many athletes including 41-year-old Thompson". Inside the Games. Dunsar Media. Retrieved July 20, 2022.
  7. ^ "WCH Oregon22 announces first ever Team Trophies at World Championships". World Athletics. March 10, 2022. Retrieved July 20, 2022.
  8. ^ "Record number of countries win gold at World Athletics Championships Oregon22". World Athletics. July 25, 2022. Retrieved July 25, 2022.
  9. ^ Manning, Jeff (July 27, 2022). "Eugene charms athletes, fans as unlikely World Athletics Championships host". The Oregonian.
  10. ^ "United States to host 2021 IAAF World Championships". USA Track & Field. Retrieved September 5, 2015.[dead link]
  11. ^ "Eugene, Oregon awarded 2021 Worlds without bidding process". BBC Sport. April 16, 2015. Retrieved April 16, 2015.
  12. ^ "The Beynon Track at Hayward Field is a Record Breaking Machine". Beynon Sports. August 21, 2021. Retrieved July 21, 2022.
  13. ^ "WCH OREGON22 Road Events Information". World Athletics. Retrieved July 21, 2022.
  14. ^ "Qualifying systems approved for World Athletics Championships Oregon22 and World Athletics U20 Championships Nairobi 21". World Athletics. December 12, 2021. Retrieved July 21, 2022.
  15. ^ "Oregon 2022 Timetable". World Athletics. Retrieved July 26, 2021.
  16. ^ "Entry List by Country and event" (PDF). World Athletics. July 7, 2022. Retrieved July 21, 2022.
  17. ^ "Duplantis breaks world pole vault record with 6.21m in Oregon | REPORT | WCH 22 | World Athletics". worldathletics.org. Retrieved July 25, 2022.
  18. ^ "Athlete Refugee Team fields squad of three in Oregon | NEWS | WCH 22 | World Athletics".
  19. ^ "TDK and World Athletics to support world record programme in Oregon" (Press release). World Athletics. July 14, 2022. Retrieved July 21, 2022.
  20. ^ "How to follow and watch the World Athletics Championships Oregon22". World Athletics. July 9, 2022. Retrieved July 21, 2022.
  21. ^ "Record number of countries win gold at World Athletics Championships Oregon22". World Athletics. July 25, 2022. Retrieved July 25, 2022.
  22. ^ "NBC Sports Group & World Athletics Partner on Long-Term Media Rights Agreement for World Championships in Track and Field". NBC Sports. November 23, 2020. Retrieved January 9, 2021.

External links