1983 United States House of Representatives elections

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

There were five elections to the United States House of Representatives in 1983, during the 98th United States Congress.

List of elections

Elections are listed by date and district.

District Incumbent This race
Member Party First elected Results Candidates
Texas 6 Phil Gramm Democratic 1978 Incumbent resigned January 5, 1983 to run as a Republican.
Incumbent re-elected February 12, 1983.
Republican gain.
New York 7 Benjamin S. Rosenthal Democratic 1962 (Special) Incumbent died January 4, 1983.
New member elected March 1, 1983.
Democratic hold.
Colorado 6 None (district created following the 1980 census) Representative-elect Jack Swigert (R) died December 27, 1982, of bone cancer.
New member elected March 29, 1983.
Republican gain.
California 5 Phillip Burton Democratic 1964 (Special) Incumbent died April 10, 1983.
New member elected June 21, 1983.
Democratic hold.
Illinois 1 Harold Washington Democratic 1980 Incumbent resigned April 30, 1983 to become Mayor of Chicago.
New member elected August 23, 1983.
Democratic hold.
Georgia 7 Larry McDonald Democratic 1974 Incumbent died September 1, 1983 in the Korean Air Lines Flight 007.
New member elected November 8, 1983.
Democratic hold.
Special primary (October 18, 1983):

Special runoff (November 8, 1983):

References

  1. ^ "TX District 6 Special". March 10, 2008. Retrieved July 21, 2019 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  2. ^ "NY District 7 Special". March 13, 2011. Retrieved July 21, 2019 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  3. ^ "CO District 6 Special". March 10, 2008. Retrieved June 19, 2022 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  4. ^ "CA District 5 - Special Election". January 21, 2005. Retrieved July 21, 2019 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  5. ^ "IL District 1 - Special Election". November 23, 2012. Retrieved July 21, 2019 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  6. ^ "GA District 7 - Special Primary". April 19, 2017. Retrieved July 21, 2019 – via OurCampaigns.com.
  7. ^ "GA District 7 - Special Runoff". May 24, 2016. Retrieved July 21, 2019 – via OurCampaigns.com.